HEY YOU! Leave Those Cute Fawns Alone

Awe! They’re so cute! Those cute, little, spotted deer fawns, aren’t they the most adorable things ever? I love seeing the newborn animals during the springtime when I’m outdoors. It means the resource is being renewed and we’ll have more wild animals for future years. Although it’s fabulous to see them, view them, and continue on, New Mexico’s Department of Game and Fish has shared the ever needed reminder — LEAVE THOSE BABIES ALONE!

Public reminded to leave young wildlife alone

SANTA FE – Spring in New Mexico is an exciting time for wildlife. This is the time of year when most babies are born. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish reminds the public to leave alone any deer or antelope fawns, elk calves, bear cubs or other wild animals they may find.

Most young-of-the-year wildlife that people discover are simply hiding while awaiting their parents’ return from foraging nearby.

Removing these young animals can cost them their lives, Orrin Duvuvuei, department deer and pronghorn biologist, warned.

“For about a week after birth, young wildlife exhibit hiding behaviors to avoid detection and increase their chance for survival. You might think it has been abandoned, but in reality, the mother is typically a few hundred yards away,” Duvuvuei said. “In most cases, the best thing to do is just leave it alone and quietly leave the area.”

Returning a young wild animal to its natural environment after it’s been carried off by a human can be very difficult and may not work in many cases, Duvuvuei said.

If you see young wildlife, please follow these guidelines:

  • Do not approach. Its mother is likely close by and aware that you are in the area.
  • Leave the area quickly and quietly.
  • Observe the animal from a safe distance. Typically wildlife babies that appear to be dry have bonded with their mothers, and you can safely take their pictures from this distance, but don’t linger in the area or touch the animal.
  • If you think the animal has been abandoned, if possible mark the location using a GPS and contact the department by calling (888) 248-6866.

For more information about living with wildlife in New Mexico, please visit the department website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

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A Wildlife Reminder: Time to be Bear Aware  

CPW_SiteLogoBears have emerged from hibernation and are on the prowl for food. Colorado Parks and Wildlife is sending its annual reminder, asking Colorado residents and visitors to be “Bear Aware.”

In early spring, bears can usually find sources of natural food as wild plants begin to grow nutritious new sprouts. Bears also prefer natural sources of food. But if food becomes scarce some bears will go to residential areas looking for a meal.

Significant bear/human conflicts usually don’t start until mid-summer. But now’s the time to start thinking about how you can be bear aware. By taking some simple precautions, you can avoid conflicts with bears at your home and in your neighborhood.

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Bears are out and Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reminding everyone to be “bear aware.”

Here is a list that will help us to keep bears wild:

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Around the house 

  • Keep garbage in a well-secured location.
  • Only put out garbage on the morning of pickup.
  • Clean garbage cans regularly to keep them odor free. The scent of ammonia can deter bears.
  • Use a bear-resistant trash can or dumpster. These are available from your trash hauler or on Internet sites.
  • Bears have an excellent sense of smell, so try to prevent odors. If you don’t have secure storage, put items that might become smelly into the freezer until trash day.
  • Keep garage doors closed.
  • Lock your doors when you’re away from home and at night.
  • Keep the bottom floor windows of your house closed when you’re not at home.
  • Clean-up thoroughly after picnics in the yard or on the deck. Don’t allow food odors to linger.
  • Talk to your neighbors and kids about being bear aware.
Minimize items that attract bears or other wildlife
  • Do not attract other wildlife by feeding them.
  • Don’t leave pet food or stock feed outside.
  • Bird feeders are a major source of bear/human conflicts. Attract birds naturally with flowers and water baths. Do not hang bird feeders from April 15 to Nov. 15.
  • If you must have bird feeders: clean up beneath them every day, bring them in at night, and hang them high so that they’re completely inaccessible to bears.
  • Bears have good memories and will return to places they’ve found food.
  • Allow grills to burn for a couple of minutes after cooking to burn off grease and to eliminate odors. Clean the grill after each use.
  • If you have fruit trees, pick fruit before it gets too ripe. Don’t allow fruit to rot on the ground.
  • Secure compost piles. Bears are attracted to the scent of rotting food — and they’ll eat almost anything.
  • If you keep small livestock, keep animals in a fully covered enclosure, don’t store food outside, keep enclosures clean to minimize odors, hang rags soaked in ammonia around the enclosure.
  • If you have bee hives, install electric fencing where allowed.
Be careful with vehicles and at campsites
  • Do not keep food in your vehicle; roll up windows and lock the doors of your vehicles.
  • When car-camping, secure all food and coolers in a locked vehicle after you’ve eaten.
  • Keep a clean camp, whether you’re in a campground or in the back-country.
  • When camping in the back-country, hang food 100 feet or more from campsite.
  • Don’t bring any food or fragrant items into your tent
  • Cook food well away from your tent; wash dishes thoroughly.

For more information go to the Living with Wildlife section on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife web site: cpw.state.co.us.CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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New Mexico State Wildlife Action Plan Approved by Federal Administrators

USFWS approves N.M.’s State Wildlife Action Plan

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish received notice the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officially approved New Mexico’s State Wildlife Action Plan on Wednesday.

The plan was approved by the New Mexico State Game Commission last November and was submitted to federal administrators resulting in an initial release of $812,000 in State Wildlife Grant Program (SWG) funds and qualifies the department to continue receiving annual funds through 2025.

New Mexico’s State Wildlife Action Plan is a non-regulatory, science-based planning document that provides an inventory of species throughout the state in need of conservation, their habitats, potential threats and potential conservation actions. The department will use the plan to guide the preparation of SWG grant requests for projects beneficial to species in need of conservation.

For more information or to obtain a copy of the final State Wildlife Action Plan, please visit the department’s website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

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Big-Game Allocations for Colorado’s Gunnison Basin

Big game licensing open house in Gunnison, March 30

CPW_SiteLogoGUNNISON, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife will present the proposed 2017 big-game license allocations for the Gunnison Basin at an open house, 4:30-7 p.m., March 30, at the Fred Field Center at the Gunnison County Fairgrounds in Gunnison.

CPW biologists and district wildlife managers will be on hand to talk about the status of deer, elk, bears, pronghorn and moose in Game Management Units 54, 55, 551, 66 and 67. Agency staff will also explain CPW’s recommendations for license availability for deer and elk seasons and take comments from the public.

Terrestrial Biologist Kevin Blecha will give an overview presentation, one to start the meeting and another at 6 p.m.

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CPW will also present the latest information on winter deer-survival monitoring.

CPW staff will also be available to answer questions about applying for big game licenses for those who need assistance.

For more information, call 970-641-7060.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Bighorn Sheep Relocated to Cochiti Canyon

Bighorn sheep captured and relocated to Cochiti Canyon 

bighorn sheep captured

SANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish captured 34 bighorn sheep this week at the Chevron Mine in Questa and transferred them to Cochiti Canyon to supplement the existing Jemez Mountains herd.

The bighorn sheep on mine property came from a herd at Wheeler Peak. Biologists wanted to move the sheep primarily to augment the Jemez Herd. They also wanted to reduce the number of sheep along N.M. 38 between Questa and Red River. Numerous sheep in recent years have been killed in traffic collisions on the rural highway. A motorcyclist also died in one of those crashes.

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Most of the captured sheep where netted at a roadside site, said Nicole Quintana, the department’s big game program manager.

The captured sheep were released on U.S. Forest Service Land at Cochiti Canyon in the Jemez Mountains where an existing herd of about 45 animals was established in 2014 following the Las Conchas fire. The relocated sheep may move onto Cochiti Pueblo and Bandelier National Monument lands, Quintana said.

For more information about the department please visit www.wildlife.state.nm.us.


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Colorado Lynx Dies of Natural Causes

Lynx died of natural causes

CPW_SiteLogoDURANGO, Colo. – A lynx that was found dead on a ski slope Jan. 8 at the Purgatory Ski Resort died of natural causes, Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced Wednesday. The lynx was seen by dozens of people at the ski area and a video of the cat was viewed on social media nearly 1 million times.

A necropsy of the 11-year-old male found a tumor in the animal’s throat that prevented it from eating. Although not common, tumors are found in wildlife.

While the news was greeted with regret by many people, this lynx is symbolic of the success of CPW’s reintroduction program.

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This is a photograph of a lynx being released by CPW as part of the reintroduction program in 2006 near Creede, Colo.

“The cat lived a long life in the wild and spent it’s time in some of Colorado’s most incredible backcountry,” said Scott Wait, senior terrestrial biologist for CPW’s southwest region. Wait was involved with the reintroduction from the start and continues to work on long-term monitoring efforts.

Lynx from Canada and Alaska were transplanted to Colorado starting in 1999. Most were released near the Weminuche Wilderness in southwest Colorado. The area was chosen because it contains few roads compared with other areas in the state. All the cats that were released were fitted with radio collars and tracked by researchers. This allowed CPW to monitor them, watch for mortalities, find their dens and locate newborn kittens. A microchip was implanted into all the kittens  ‒ the same type pet veterinarians use ‒ so that researchers could identify the animals later if they were found.

 

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To the delight of biologists, a chip was found in this lynx and it revealed the cat was born in the Bear Creek area near Telluride in 2005. The cat’s mother was one of the original lynx released in the reintroduction program. A record number of lynx dens, 16, were found that year by CPW biologists.

In 2009, the cat was captured as part of a research effort and fitted with a GPS collar which revealed that it was living in the remote area between Telluride, Rico and the Purgatory ski area. The collar eventually fell off the animal.

“The lynx lived in what is the best type of habitat for its species, high elevation and thick spruce-fir forest. This shows that much of Colorado’s high country is suitable lynx habitat,” Wait said.

A long-term monitoring project in southwest Colorado that uses snow-tracking and remote cameras has shown that lynx are occupying ideal habitat and are doing well in the wild. Frequent lynx sightings in many mountain areas also provide anecdotal evidence that cats are now part of the Colorado landscape. Because the cats are elusive and live in remote areas, CPW cannot accurately estimate the population of the large felines.

Even though the lynx was in its last days when it was seen on the ski slopes, the sightings provided a rare opportunity for people to see a large cat in the wild, said Patt Dorsey, CPW’s southwest regional manager.

“We talk a lot about the importance of wildlife, but when we get to see extraordinary animals in the wild, it gives us a much greater appreciation of their beauty and of the importance of conserving the natural world,” Dorsey said.

To read more about lynx, go to the CPW web site at: http://cpw.state.co.us.

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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Conservation Partners of the Year Announced by Bass Pro Shops

Bass Pro Shops Announces 2016 Conservation Partners of the Year

Pioneer founder of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (B.A.S.S.) Ray Scott; legendary angler Bill Dance; and country music artist John Anderson among those honored for achievements

Celebratory event salutes conservation with Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, former US Marine Mark Geist and NASCAR star Martin Truex, Jr.

bass-pro-shops-logo-bassproSPRINGFIELD, MO. – Bass Pro Shops has presented a series of awards for noted conservation partners of the year including Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (B.A.S.S.)    founder Ray Scott; legendary angler Bill Dance; and country music recording artist John Anderson. Bass Pro Shops Founder Johnny Morris announced the awards during a special holiday ceremony with Bass Pro Shops associates at the company’s headquarters in Springfield, Missouri.

“All of us at Bass Pro Shops are proud to honor these individuals for their unwavering dedication to conservation,” said Morris who is himself a noted conservationist. “Long recognized and well respected as leaders for their conservation efforts and support, they continue to help restore and conserve our natural resources and important habitats for North America’s wildlife.”

 

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Ray W. Scott, Jr – Fisherman’s Best Friend Award
Ray Scott, Jr. is a bass fishing pioneer and founder of the Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (B.A.S.S.) and the Whitetail Institute of North America. Scott’s first All-American Invitational Bass Tournament in 1967 at Beaver Lake in northwest Arkansas lured 106 anglers from 15 states. Today the club of bass fishing enthusiasts boasts a membership well over half a million worldwide. As a publisher, Scott has framed the foundation for successful outdoor publications including BASSMASTER Magazine (considered by many to be the “Bible of bass fishing”) and the award-winning national television series “The BASSMASTERS”— at one time, the highest rated program on The Nashville Network (TNN).

 

A true pioneer in the sport of bass fishing, Scott has also contributed to significant conservation efforts throughout his career including tournaments that paved the way for the “Catch and Release” concept. Today more than 98 percent of the bass weighed-in during national B.A.S.S. tournaments are returned alive to the waters. He also advocated against the dumping of aquatic herbicides in public waters.

Bill Dance – Fisherman’s Best Friend Award
Perhaps as well known for his orange and white University of Tennessee cap as Ray Scott is for his trademark Stetson, William G. “Bill” Dance is one of the world’s most famous and beloved fisherman. “Bill Dance Outdoors” premiered on a Memphis ABC affiliate in 1968 and has been growing in popularity ever since. Today the show is televised nationwide and its host has achieved celebrity status among the nation’s 45 million anglers. Dance has received numerous accolades including 23 national bass fishing titles and seven B.A.S.S. titles.

Dance and Morris first became friends when both were on the professional bass circuit and have worked together to promote key conservation issues. Most recently, Dance was instrumental in the formation of Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid in his hometown of Memphis, Tennessee. Morris was still contemplating the project when he and Dance went fishing in the shadow of the Pyramid along with the late Jack Emmitt, Bass Pro Shops’ first fishing manager. Morris said if they caught a 30-pound or heavier catfish that day he would commit to the Pyramid transformation. As the legend goes, they caught a 34-pound catfish and the rest is history.

John Anderson – Conservation Partner of the Year
John Anderson is an American country recording artist with a successful career that has spanned more than 30 years. But Anderson is also a lifelong hunter, angler, and conservationist who learned to hunt and fish from his father, “Pops.” It was that love of the outdoors instilled by his father that was the inspiration for his smash country hit, “Seminole Wind.”  Anderson’s strong belief in the need to give back more to conservation than we take is illustrated in many ways including donating his time and talent with performances at national conservation conventions.

Special Guests and Appearances
Among the many celebrities and special guests attending the event, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, last year’s honoree, was honored for his outstanding leadership in conservation issues and the outdoors during his administration. With his wife, First Lady Georganne Nixon, they initiated many new programs such as Missouri State Parks, the Governor’s 100 Missouri Mile Challenge, the First Lady’s Children in Nature Challenge, Governor’s Capitol Campout and Bass Pro Shops Outdoor Days at the Capitol and many more.

Former US Marine Mark Geist was also honored at the event with a special Defender of Freedom Award, part of the company’s long-standing tradition of honoring members of the armed services, veterans and their families.

NASCAR star Martin Truex, Jr. also attended the event to thank Morris and Bass Pro Shops for its generous donations to the Martin Truex, Jr. Foundation in support of cancer research.

Past Honorees
The annual awards are given to individuals who exemplify ideals of conservation leadership and complement Bass Pro Shops mission to inspire people to enjoy, love and conserve the great outdoors. Past winners of the Bass Pro Shops Conservation Partner of the Year Award include Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, First Lady Georganne Nixon, President and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation Collin O’Mara, Jeff Trandahl of the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; Rob Keck of the National Wild Turkey Federation;  Richard Childress of Richard Childress Racing; Dave Murphy, executive director of the Conservation Federation of Missouri; Sarah Parker-Pauley, director of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources; Bob Ziehmer, director of the Missouri Department of Conservation; John Hoskins of the Missouri Department of Conservation, Dale Hall, CEO of Ducks Unlimited, and former President of the United States, George H. W. Bush.

About Bass Pro Shops®
Bass Pro Shops is a leading destination retailer offering outdoor gear and apparel in an immersive setting. Founded in 1972 when avid young angler Johnny Morris began selling tackle out of his father’s liquor store in Springfield, Missouri, today 101 retail and marine centers host 120 million people annually. Bass Pro Shops also operates White River Marine Group, offering an unsurpassed collection of industry-leading boat brands, and Big Cedar Lodge, America’s Premier Wilderness Resort. Under the visionary conservation leadership of Johnny Morris, Bass Pro Shops is known as a national leader in protecting habitat and introducing families to the outdoors and has been named by Forbes as “one of America’s Best Employers.”


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Colorado Native Fish no Longer “Federally Endangered” Candidate

CPW_SiteLogoCOLORADO SPRINGS — The Arkansas darter is a two-and-a-half inch native perch found throughout southeastern Colorado, Kansas and a few other states. On Oct. 6, 2016, after a 12-month finding, these fish were official categorized as “ not warranted” for federal listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, bringing some relief to more than 40 years of concern for the species.

Arkansas darter were listed as threatened at the state level by Colorado Parks and Wildlife in 1975, and through a collaborative effort with FWS and other state wildlife management agencies, were designated a federal candidate species in 1991. Candidate species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, are described as “having sufficient concern for their biological status but for which development of a proposed listing regulation is precluded by other higher priority listings.”not-endangered-fish-colorado-cpw-7c599e43-7c3a-49fc-8127-475589801162

In 1994 (with recent updates) these status listings prompted CPW biologists to partner with the FWS and other wildlife agencies to develop an individual recovery plan for the species. The plan included ramping up conservation efforts, such as work with private landowners, habitat conservation, hatchery propagation, reintroduction and re-establishment of populations, and long term monitoring and research, among other actions.

“This ‘not warranted’ decision is a testament to the dedication and effort of many CPW staff over many years,” said Harry Crockett, CPW Native Aquatic Species Coordinator.

The decision was based on a recent status assessment of the Arkansas darter throughout its range in Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Representative species biologists from each state, FWS biologists, as well as climate and hydrology scientists worked throughout 2014 and 2015 on assessing the species’ health, distribution and potential future.

“The Species Status Assessment Report for the Arkansas darter, and the FWS’s resulting 12-month finding was a superb collaboration between the affected states and the FWS,” said Vernon Tabor, Species Biologist, FWS; Arkansas darter assessment lead. “While the finding was solely FWS responsibility, we needed the excellent data, coordination and expertise we found in our state partners, including Colorado Parks and Wildlife. This allowed us to make our decision based on the most sound and recent science available.”

Threats to Arkansas darters still persist, as illustrated by their listing as a Tier One species in CPW’s 2015 State Wildlife Action Plan.

“Probably our greatest concern for the long term stability of Arkansas darters is specifically related to the future of water, especially spring water and headwater reaches, that provide good habitat on the plains of the Arkansas River Basin,” said Paul Foutz, Native Aquatic Species Biologist – CPW Southeast Region.

The darter occupy cool, clear spring-fed streams and seeps with abundant vegetation and feed primarily on invertebrates. The fish are found throughout the Arkansas River Basin, however populations are now typically isolated from one another. These populations are primarily found in the Big Sandy Creek, Chico Creek, Fountain Creek, and Rush Creek drainages, as well as several drainages north and east of Lamar, Colorado.

Historical records of Arkansas darters date back to 1889, but records were scant until a 1979-1981 CPW native fishes inventory of the Arkansas River Basin identified a far more widespread distribution of the species.

CPW will continue to make recovery and conservation of Arkansas darters a high priority.

“CPW is fully committed to continuing work to ensure that the species persists and fulfills its important niche in a fundamentally water-scarce region which is likely to become drier in the future. However, we, along with our partner agencies throughout the species’ range, can all be proud to have achieved the level of security and stability for the species that this ‘not warranted’ decision reflects,” said Crockett.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Review Colorado Elk Management Plan

While we hunt elk  for sustenance it’s our ultimate responsibility to preserve all wildlife populations. Colorado Parks and Wildlife works hard to help maintain healthy animal populations in the state. Go weigh in on their most recent proposal in preserving the herds. ~Mia

 

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Gunnison-area Elk management plan ready for review

GUNNISON, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife has completed its draft elk management plan for Game Management Units 66 and 67 and the document is now posted on the CPW web site for a 30-day comment period at: http://cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/HerdManagementPlans.aspx.CPW-Elk-Hunt-Colorado-31d093de-9033-418e-8490-70c30517129c

Elk management plans establish objectives for population size in specific areas about every 10 years. These objectives are utilized by CPW for annual license setting.

CPW biologists gathered input from hunters during the development of this draft plan over the past year. Input from hunters was gathered through two public scoping meetings which attracted more than 200 people, an online survey open to the general public, a randomized survey of people who have hunted in GMUs 66 and 67, and various comment letters.


“Spend more time with your family and friends, whether it be outside, hunting, at the shooting range or around the table, savoring all life has to offer.” Mia


Anyone interest in commenting on this draft plan may do so. Agricultural/rangeland owners and managers and those whose economic interests might be affected by this plan are especially encouraged to submit comment letters. Revisions to the draft plan can still be made in response to comments received over this 30-day period. The draft plan will go to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission early next year for review and approval.

Comments on the draft plan can be submitted by e-mail to: Kevin.blecha@state.co.us; or mailed to Attn: Kevin Blecha, 300 W. New York Ave., Gunnison, CO, 81230. Comments must be submitted by Nov. 22.

The link to the plan is on the right side of the web page under the headline, “Draft plans for public comment.”


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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.

Wildlife Humor and Education by Mia & LG at the WON

We were both excited about getting a picture before the guy ran off.

Then it dawned on me: “Why hasn’t this buck run yet?”

He twitched his tail.

LG got her camera focused in just about the time it took me to click off a couple of photos.

The buck shook his head.

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