Quick and Easy Rifle Scope Sight-In

Sighting in your rifle scope really should be quick and easy. Aside from a windy day, or a loose or defective scope, the only thing that would cause a poor shot grouping this the shooter. Let’s eliminate some of those factors and get sighted in.

After your rifle scope has been properly mounted and bore sighted, you have to fire some rounds down range and zero the scope on a target. Don’t rely on a bore-sight.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

The other day a friend came over to sight in his new rifle and scope. I happened to have been busy with work, and since sighting in really takes no time at all, I figured I’d not pack up work but let him get things dialed in.

After a few hours and numerous boxes of ammunition, the shots still were not in a tight group on the target.

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Let me share a quick way to get your crosshairs on target that requires minimal shots fired.

As I mentioned, you need to have a rifle with the scope properly mounted. If you don’t know how to do this, take it to the shop and leave it to the pros. After that, you’re ready to head to the range.

I mentioned wind and faulty equipment. If it’s a gusty, windy day, skip the sighting in until the winds are calm. You’ve already had a pro mount the scope, and we’ll take it from the factory that the scope is in good working order. Next, we need to eliminate another factor and that’s the shooter. Mount the gun into a shooting rest that is sitting solidly on a stable shooting bench. This will eliminate most the the errors caused by the shooter.

Bring the ammunition that you intend to hunt or compete with. One box of ammunition should suffice.

Mount paper sight in targets down range. I suggest zeroing your hunting rifle at 200 yards. This distance can be adjusted according to your preference.  The Shoot and See type of targets with the grid and bullseye work well. Bring your binoculars and/or spotting scope so that you can see from the shooting bench where the shots are hitting on the target. A friend isn’t required for this project but does come in handy.

*Always follow safety rules when handling firearms.

Place your rifle securely in the shooting rest and load one cartridge into the chamber. Place the crosshairs directly on the center of the bullseye and fire one shot. Use the binocular or spotting scope to check the location of impact on the target. If the impact is 3 inches high and 5 inches right, make note of it. Then repeat the shot, for accuracy purposes, to find a shot grouping. Again, place the rifle securely in the rest, put your crosshairs on the bullseye and fire one round.

If the second shot is in the same area of the target as the first, you’re ready for scope adjustment. If not, continue the process of securing the rifle in the rest, aiming at the bullseye, and shooting. Make sure you have a good shot group before you begin adjusting the scope.

Do not compensate by moving your crosshairs on the target. This is called chasing your shot and will not help you to get a good shot group. If you cannot determine a shot group, clear your gun and head back to the shop to double-check your scope.

Once you have a shot grouping, remove the adjustment covers on the scope. With the rifle still secured in the shooting rest, look through the scope and place the crosshairs on the holes you’ve shot in the target

This is where a friend comes in handy. As you peer through the scope, at the holes in the target, have your friend move the windage and elevations of adjustments, down and left, until your crosshairs come back to the bullseye. Do not move the rifle during this process.

Now your scope’s crosshairs are on the bullseye. Make sure your range is still safe and fire two more shots, to double-check the accuracy. You should be dialed in and good to go for the hunt. If all goes well, you’re looking at four shots fired. You may need to fire additional rounds for fine-tuning, and you’ll definitely want to practice shooting positions after the scope has been zeroed from the steady shooting rest.

Remember, you always need to double-check the accuracy of your rifle after you’ve traveled with it, even if you’ve had it securely stowed in a hard case.


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Biggest Month in Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program History

I enjoy volunteering time to teach gun and hunting safety. I’ve written and spoken about the NRA’s Eddie Eagle GunSafe program many times. That’s why I’m excited to share this great news with you!

July 2018 Marks Biggest Month in Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program History

MAC WordPress Feature (7)FAIRFAX, Va. – The NRA Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program reached another milestone in its 30th anniversary year, as the program fulfilled more requests for Eddie Eagle program materials in the month of July 2018 than any other month in program history.

The NRA provided more than 250,000 Eddie Eagle student workbooks throughout July primarily to law enforcement agencies throughout the nation, many of whom will use the materials to teach firearm accident prevention during community events, such as the National Night Out ™ this summer.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

In the program’s three decades of outreach, more than 30 million children across the United States have learned NRA’s simple, effective firearm accident prevention principles. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unintentional firearm fatalities among children of the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program’s targeted age group have declined almost 80 percent since the program’s debut.

Created in 1988 by NRA Past President Marion P. Hammer, the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program is a gun accident prevention program developed by a task force made up of educators, school administrators, curriculum specialists, urban housing safety officials, clinical psychologists, law enforcement officials and National Rifle Association firearm safety experts. The program was founded with one mission: to teach children four simple, easy to remember steps so they know what to do if they ever come across a gun — STOP! Don’t Touch. Run Away. Tell a Grownup.

Impacting approximately a million children a year, the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program has been utilized by more than 28,000 schools, law enforcement agencies, and civic groups. The governors of 26 states have signed resolutions recommending that the program be used in their school systems and the legislatures of 25 states passed resolutions recommending the use of the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program.

Funds raised through Friends of NRA and distributed through The NRA Foundation enable schools and police departments to teach the program at minimal or no cost. The NRA encourages citizens nationwide to participate in heightening gun accident prevention awareness within their local communities. School administrators and faculty, law enforcement agencies, civic groups, and others interested in more information about the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program should contact the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program by email at eddie@nrahq.org or call (800) 231-0752. Parents can visit http://www.eddieeagle.com to begin learning today!

About the National Rifle Association

Established in 1871, the National Rifle Association is America’s oldest civil rights and sportsmen’s group. Nearly six million members strong, NRA continues its mission to uphold Second Amendment rights and is the leader in firearm education and training for law-abiding gun owners, law enforcement and the military. Visit http://www.nra.org.


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Reducing Recoil with Muzzle Brakes

As we get closer to hunting season this week’s tip to get your shots on target in about muzzle brakes. When we plan to hunt with a rifle we need to do our best to make sure we have good shot groupings.

I’ve shared ways to attain a tighter shot grouping and a few ways to reduce shooting flinch. After that, I received a message from a friend telling me that adding a muzzle brake to the rifle is a way to reduce flinch. While the brake reduces recoil, it doesn’t necessarily reduce shooting flinch.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

I have a muzzle brake on the end of the barrel of my 6.5-300 Weatherby, my daught3er has one on her .270 WSM, and H has one on his .338-378 Weatherby. Are you noticing a pattern with these three guns? They are ones that shoot very hot rounds. That means the cartridge is loaded with a lot of gunpowder and when it’s ignited, it produces a mass of gasses that go “bang” and push the bullet out of the barrel.  Many of the rifles that shoot “hot” loads will have muzzle brakes on the end because without one the recoil would be tremendous.

Muzzle brakes are ported devices that attach to the end of the barrel and are designed to reduce recoil. They are not suppressors. The brake has ports that angle so as to push the gasses, which push the bullet out of the barrel, back. The shooter and bystanders will feel the effects/wind from the shot.

( + ) Reduced Recoil

The redirecting of the gasses causes the felt effect of recoil to be spread out instead of pushing the rifle directly back into the shoulder. Most muzzle brakes reduce recoil by about 50%.

This is something that indeed may reduce shooting flinch for someone, but let’s talk about some of the other plusses and minuses before we come to a verdict.

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( – ) Noise

You and any bystanders need to wear your eyes and ears when you’re shooting a rifle with a muzzle brake on the end of the barrel. Instead of being blown downrange the sound is being blown back to you. Along with this, dust and debris may be propelled in your direction Be safe and wear your proper protective equipment.

( +/- ) Accurate

The muzzle brake won’t decrease the velocity or accuracy of the projectile. However, you’ll need a gunsmith to install it and then you’ll need to sight it in. If you remove it you’ll need to sight in your rifle again.

( – ) Adds Barrel Length

The brake adds to the length of the barrel. I personally have no issue with the added length, however, some people do. If overall length is an issue, you may order your rifle with a shorter barrel prior to adding the brake.

( – ) Debris

A ported device that adds length to the barrel makes me think about knocking tree branches as I’m hiking, which leads me to the issue of debris. With a muzzle brake, you need to be aware that the ports will increase your chances of collecting debris in the barrel. The ports can snag pine needles and other items as your hiking. The good news is it’s easy to remedy this issue. Either rubberband a plastic bag over the brake, or cut the fingertip off of a latex glove and roll it over the brake at the barrel’s end. These are easy to remove and in a pinch, you can even shoot through them.

A muzzle brake is something you can look at to reduce recoil. It makes those larger calibers and hotter loads more “shootable.” However, due to that increased noise and the blow-back of air, it can actually increase shooting flinch. Overcome that with practice at the range.


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Hunting Prep – Reduce Shooting Flinch

If you’ve been to the range to prep for hunting season and have noticed that your shot groups aren’t consistent, it may be due to the developed bad habit of Shooting Flinch.

While sighting in with a friend I noticed that she’d developed a flinch. She was anticipating the recoil while shooting her rifle, which significantly reduced her accuracy on target.

If you’re having a similar problem, there are a couple of techniques you can try to help reduce flinch. We need to get a tight shot group on the target.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

Shooters feel the recoil as it punches the butt of the rifle into the shoulder. It’s most recognizable when we shoot from a bench or prone shooting position. If it isn’t addressed, it can lead to bad habits which carry on into the field and can ruin a hunt.

In addition to the flinch, some habits a shooter can develop are closing their eyes, pulling or jerking the trigger, or sitting back or pulling away just as they pull the trigger. These bad habits will cause their shots to rarely hit the zone where they are aiming.

 

Mia-Anstine-shooting-6.5-300-Weatherby-Swarovski-x5i-optics

Start by shooting from a bench or lead sled to make sure the optics are zeroed. After that, you need to transition to a shooter held rifle position.

One thing you can do is to add a shoulder pad, puffy jacket or vest. Another thing a shooter can do is purchase a butt pad for their rifle. It will absorb a great amount of the recoil between the gun stock and the shooter’s shoulder. Something you’ll need to consider is that this will change the length of pull for the shooter, so test out the trigger finger’s reach before you go to live fire. This should be done before the hunt anyhow as we may be wearing different gear depending on the weather conditions.

With the added padding between the rifle and shoulder, the anticipation of recoil induced pain may be reduced.

With the expectation of recoil out of the way, you may notice other issues. Such as the bad habit of closing the eyes or the reflex of sitting back from the gun as the trigger’s pulled.

You can work on relaxing during the shot as well as some of the following:

  • Breathing techniques – Take a deep breath, slowly exhale then hold it for a pause as you pull the trigger.
  • Shoot at larger targets – Instead of aiming for a point on a bulls-eye shoot large paper animal-shaped targets. Aim for the kill-zone instead of a dot.
  • Trigger control – Worked on slowly taking up the slack on the trigger to prevent pulling or jerking her shots. Learn to pull the trigger slow and steady. As you pull the trigger look to see the point where the bullet hits the target. You should be surprised at the shot as it breaks.
  • Shoot from various positions – Shoot from the shooting bench and transition to sitting, kneeling, standing and from shooting sticks. This will provide a new focus that is not that of the anticipation of the shot.
  • Create shooting scenarios – Have a partner talk you through the following, “The elk just walked out. He’s broad-side. He’s clear. Take the shot when you’re ready.” Then add a reload into the scenario. Remind your partner, “You’re going to shoot once. Quickly throw the bolt and reload. The elk didn’t fall down. Quickly re-acquire your target and shoot again.” Rehearsing this scenario not only helps for real-life hunting situations, but it takes the shooter’s mind off the recoil.

With some practice the added confidence of shots that are grouped better we can reduce shooting flinch. Another thing to note is to shoot a very minimal number of rounds so the shooter doesn’t become tired or sore. If you’re preparing with your hunting rifle, six rounds may be plenty. Don’t let the shooter leave the range with a sore shoulder. You’ll be happy to work on better groupings instead of evading the dreaded bad habits.


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Tighter Shot Grouping – Range Time

Spending all day teaching at the women’s shooting day I remembered that I need to remind you how to attain smaller shot groups with your rifle.

The occasion at which I helped instruct is one designed for ladies who are new to shooting, or at least new to the event. If a lady is a past attendee, she needs to bring a new enrollee in order to sign up again.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

At the women’s shooting day they divide into small groups and get to learn to shoot archery, .22 rifle and handgun, muzzleloader, shotgun, and higher caliber rifles. Each year I jump in to teach where I’m needed. This year I landed at the high-caliber rifle range.

When referring to “higher caliber” rifles I’m talking something larger than a .22, meaning .223 and 5.56. Don’t be alarmed if you think those are small because later I’ll tell you about the grand finale at the rifle tent.

Under the shade of the rifle tent the ladies start out with a safety briefing, an explanation of how to properly shoot a rifle, and then we dive into the operations of an AR style rifle. After questions are answered we divide the small group in half.

This year one half came to my shooting bench where I demonstrated a proper seated position, how to hold the rifle, and how to use a peep sight.

For tighter shot groupings use a proper shooting position.

As the ladies approached the bench for their turn behind the trigger we worked on getting them into a comfortable shooting position, which involved lengthening or shortening the adjustable stock for some. Next, they learned how to check if the safety’s on, view the chamber to see if it’s clear, load the ammunition into the magazine, insert it, and then chamber a round.

Since we had a peep sight on the rifle the ladies were shooting at my bench, it really required a good shooting technique to keep the sight steady on target as they pulled the trigger. Proper shooting position is imperative, but we also reminded the ladies of the B-R-A-S-S technique (listed below).

For tighter shot groupings use B-R-A-S-S.

  • B – Breath – Take slow smooth breaths.
  • R – Release – After you’ve taken a nice slow breath, let it out about halfway.
  • A – Aim – As you let that breath out, make sure you aim and your sights are on target.
  • S – Slack – With your sight on target place your finger on the trigger and slowly pull up the slack.
  • S – Shoot – With a slow, steady trigger pull the breaking of the trigger and firing of the shot should be a surprise.

The ladies who came to my bench first really had an advantage because at the other bench they shot a similar AR style rifle, but it had a red dot optic on it.

For tighter shot groupings use a red-dot optic.

With the red dot, they didn’t have to worry about looking through a tiny hole (peep) at a post and aligning it on the center of the target. They only had to align the red dot and practice the B-R-A-S-S technique as they fired their shots.

One thing to consider if you’re going to use an electronic optic, such as the red-dot, is that you’ll need to remember to turn it off and on. If the battery dies, you’re out of luck.

I mentioned a grand finale at the rifle tent and I did mean grand. After the ladies learned safety, shooting positions, and techniques they got to shoot a .50 BMG with a long-range tactical scope attached.

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For tighter shot groupings use a scope.

Before teaching the ladies how to shoot the gun that’s about as long as I am tall we explained how it worked and I again demonstrated how to hold the gun and showed them proper shooting position. Behind this big gun, shooting position matters — A LOT. I also showed how to use your off-hand (not the trigger hand) to raise and lower the stock end of the rifle to get the target in your sights.

Once the ladies were properly seated behind the large rifle they learned how to align the crosshairs on the target. They again practiced the B-R-A-S-S technique as they fired a single shot.

If you too utilize and practice the above-mentioned accessories and techniques, you’ll have better shot-groupings on your targets.


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techniques-for-tighter-shot-grouping-MAC-Outdoors

Remembering the Guns Our Heroes Used – RETRO

If you received my newsletter or happened across my last post, you know that I got outside for the remembrance weekend of Memorial Day. I feel that it is important to pay homage to our history and those who served to create the freedoms we Americans cherish on a daily basis.

Prior to getting outdoors, I came down with some sort of cold or sinus thing. It really knocked me on my butt for a complete day. My entire body hurt — Yes, it even hurt to touch my skin. I was miserable, but I didn’t let that stop me from getting out and sharing the high country and horses with friends.

I’ll admit, the 11,000-foot elevation was probably a bad idea, but as you can imagine, I SURVIVED, and the family and their littles had a blast! Stay tuned because tomorrow I’ll tell you about the post-trip woes and how I’m working through them. For now, I want to share a piece of the present that pays homage to a bit of gun history.

As you know, I am a collector (not a hoarder) of guns. I have more guns than shoes to be sure. Yep. That does mean, just as with my shoes, there are several on the shelf that are never used. That is to say, they have a special place and will never be tossed out.

My dad first taught me firearm safety and how to shoot when I was about five-years-old. I remember firing my great uncle’s Uzi in the deserts of Nevada a year or so after that. What an amazing gun, that wasn’t as much fun to shoot when I tried it at the range during SHOT Show a few years back.

Regardless, it’s fun to remember guns and to try new ones — or new ones that resemble some of the older ones. That’s why when I saw these Retro guns by Brownell’s, at SHOT Show and then at NRA’s Annual Meetings, I needed to take a closer look. What do you think? Should I buy one or build one? Hint – Read through them all to find out which outrageous one I have my eyes on.Retro Guns (5)

Brownell’s Retro Guns

BRN10 .308

Retro GunsThe BRN-10 is as cosmetically close in copy to the original Cuban or Sudanese issue AR10 as possible. Chambered in .308 (which will be available for purchase this summer), this gun has a trigger-style charging handle in the top of the receiver. High-tower sights.

BRN10 – Available in brown or black at Brownells.comMSRP: $1,599.99

BRN-601 5.56MM

Retro Guns (1)Chambered in 5.56, this Eugene Stoner style Airforce 601 replica gun is currently available in green finish. It has a triangle shaped charging handle. It has a chrome bolt and carrier. The upper sides are slicked off with slab lowers.

There is no mag fence and for the ultimate in Retro experience, the front pivot pin will actually pull all the way out. This was deemed as a common design flaw in the original 601’s because troopers would pull the pins out and lose them. This is why captive pins were created for later models. To be true, this Retro gun has removable front pins.

The old guns had roll pins in the back of the receiver to hold the buffer tube, The Retro has that pin. It doesn’t do anything. It is there for aesthetic purposes only. and is a cosmetic touch to be true to the original look.

The stock matches the original 601. It has a little hole for the roll pin where the sling swivel attaches. All the green finish guns ship with steel waffle pattern magazines and waffle style grip.

BRN-601 .556 – Available in green at Brownells.com – MSRP: $1,299.99

BRN-16E1 5.56MM

Retro Guns (3)This replica of the famous XM16E1 AR style rifle. It comes with black furniture. This is the replica of the first gun that was sent in large numbers to the US Army during the Vietnam War. The BRN-16E1, as with all in the Brownell’s series, is a Retro gun that tries to be true to the original.

It has a front roll-pin and small bar of magazine fence. It has a captive pin, standard charging handle and a three-prong flash-hider. Old Airforce 601’s have a duckbill flash hider. One of the changes made over time is the more beefy three-prong featured on this Retro gun.

XBRN16E1 – Available in black at Brownells.com – MSRP: $1,299.99

BRN-16A1 5.56MM

Retro Guns (2)Brownell’s unveiled this brand new Retro gun at the NRA’s Annual Meetings in Dallas, Texas last month. They also revealed an M203 37MM grenade launcher that is just like the original, except smooth bore. It attaches to the Retro BRN16A1 and is true to the original design, minus the full-auto setting. I’m thinking that’s the one I need to add to my collection. What are your thoughts?

BRN-16A1 – Available in black at Brownells.com – MSRP: $1,299.99
M203 37MM – Grenade launcher available at Brownells.com – MSRP – $1,599.00

XM177E2 5.56MM

Retro Guns (4)This is a “shortie” carbine that has a collapsable two-position stock and an optional moderator, which can be purchased separately. The original modified the sound signature a little. Due to NFA laws, this Retro look-alike item does not.

XM177E2 5.56MM – Available in black at Brownells.com – MSRP: $1,299.99

For all of the Retro series guns, you may purchase a fully built gun or you can build your own. The factory complete models come with 1:12 rifle twist like the original. If you want to shoot heavier, more modern ammunition, you can buy Retro profile barrels with a more modern 1:7 twist rate.


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Retro Guns (4)

Attendee Opportunity to Shoot Like A Girl at NRA-AM

I’ve mentioned Shoot Like A Girl many times before as an opportunity for ladies to get the feel of firearms and archery equipment at a virtual range. This year the SLG trailer will be inside the exhibit hall at the National Rifle Association’s Annual Meetings in Dallas, Texas. If you’re going to be there, stop by. Ladies, go inside and give the system a try. Men, you can by Shoot Like a Girl gear outside the trailer.

Shoot Like A Girl Mobile Range Onsite at NRA Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX

For the First Time Shoot Like A Girl Inside the Exhibit Hall at NRA Annual Meeting

Screen Shot 2018-04-18 at 8.24.30 AMAthens, AL – April 30, 2018 – Shoot Like A Girl will be at booth 12358 inside the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, TX for the NRA Annual Meeting May 4th – 6th, 2018. This is their 5th year of bringing Shoot Like A Girl’s, state-of-the-art, semi-trailer mobile range to the NRA Annual Meeting, but the first time it will be inside.

This new location will expand the opportunity for the company to interact with like-minded ladies, passionately advocate for law-abiding citizens, and promote the importance of introducing women to shooting sports. Since the company’s inception, over 17,000 women have shot with Shoot Like A Girl leading to an overall economic impact to the shooting sports industry of more than 73 million dollars.

Shoot Like A Girl offers women in attendance at the NRA Annual meeting the opportunity to participate in a revolutionary introduction process, called the Test Shots™ and Test Flights™. In this process, they shoot a pistol, AR platform rifle, and compound bows in a safe controlled environment in a short amount of time guided by NRA Certified Instructors and archery coaches. The trailer features a military grade firearms simulation system and a live archery range. Shoot Like A Girl also features a gun counter, where all of the participants at NRAAM can review and compare a wide variety of firearms. There are many models on display from the corporate partners including revolvers, semi-automatic pistols, and rifles provide women the ability to explore available options.

The meeting attendees will be able to purchase Shoot Like A Girl logo wear and licensed products at booth 12358.

Special Note For Media:

Media is invited to Shoot Like A Girl’s mobile range during the NRA Annual meeting for live or filmed interviews. Come see and capture the excitement of the fastest growing demographic in the industry! Please make media appointments with Jeanine Sayre at jeanine.sayre@shootlikeagirl.com or 256-206-2460.

About Shoot Like A Girl:

Shoot Like A Girl is the industry leader in growing the number of women in shooting sports by empowering them with confidence with the support of their corporate partners: Cabela’s, Ruger, Smith & Wesson, Beretta, Tikka, Charter Arms, Colt, GLOCK, Magpul, Savage, Peltor Sport, Truglo, Alps Outdoorz, Lyman, Trijicon, Thermacell, Mossy Oak, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Beman, Federal Premium Ammunition, Hoppes, Elite Archery and Scott Archery, Mathews, Hoyt, Neet Archery Products, S & S Outdoors, Loyal Dog Food,and Upper Canyon Outfitters.

To learn more about SLG2, visit Shoot Like A Girl online, or visit on Facebook and Twitter.


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Live on the 2A Guardian with Gabby Franco

I stayed up past my bedtime last night to do a LIVE interview on the 2A Guardian show with my good friend, Gabby Franco. I give you five hunting tips, plus tell you how to take care of your game before and after the shot, so you have the best tasting meals on your table. In case you missed our live chat, I’ve embedded the replay below.

To learn more about her, follow Gabby on her Facebook page and remember to follow me on mine too.


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Mia-Anstine-live-on-the-2A-Guardian-show-with-Gabby-Franco

Seeing Through to a Game Changing Blind

Seeing through the crowd is one thing, but seeing through the Primos Double BullⓇ SurroundView™ 270° blind is a game-changer. Day two at the National Shooting Sports Foundation’s SHOT Show proved to be a productive one. In between the board meetings, editorial meetings, hunting meetings, and others, I bumped into a colleague and we decided to take a load off as we ducked inside the see-through blind to have a meeting.

Not long ago I shared the LACE program. That’s the Ladie’s Adventure Camp Experience, and I’ve been enlisted to guide women on turkey hunting adventures. My good friend, Olympic Biathlete, Lanny Barnes, and I will take novice and experience women on a pursuit to tag a big-o Merriam’s gobbler. You know what that means, right? It means we need gear!

Friends who attended the Archery Trade Show experience via social media shared the new Primos Double Bull Surround View 360 blind. I have a couple Double Bull’s, and they are highly recommended. What caught my eye is that this blind is see through. Yes. You read that correctly, but let me clarify that. A hunter sitting inside can see through the blind, but someone, or something, outside the blind cannot see in.

When I saw this, the must-have was immediately noted, but it also brought up a question. If the sun was at an appropriate angle, would it shine through the blind and silhouette what is inside? I had to stop by the Primos booth to ask questions and check it out first hand.

Indeed, in the 360, if the sun shines appropriately, a hunter may be silhouetted, but Primos didn’t get to be such a large company by neglecting details.  They have a movable blackout wall that a hunter can attach on the side which the sun might hit. They’ve also created a 270 and 180 blind. These blinds have either one or two black-out panels, which a hunter can place at a determined angle to block out the sun. That leaves two to three see-through panels for a hunter to look through.

I doubt you’re asking the question, “What is the advantage of a see-through blind?” but in case you are the one I think of immediately is that a hunter won’t get back-doored as easily. You’ll be able to see an animal before it even comes into view of the shooting windows. You’ll have time to identify the animal species, establish the sex of the animal,  qualify its size or age, and prepare for your shot.

The PrimosⓇ Double BullⓇ SurroundView™ 360°, 270°, and 180° will be available in stores February 2018.

PrimosⓇ Double BullⓇ SurroundView™ hunting blinds

Primos-Double-Bull-Surround-View-360SurroundView 360°

  • Dimensions: 60 in x 60 in x 70 in
  • Weight: 23 lbs. w/bag
  • Silent slide closure
  • 180° full front shooting window
  • 5 shoot through ports
  • Legendary Double Bull materials and construction
  • TRUTH camo specifically designed to hide ground blinds in any terrain

SurroundView 360° – Model No. 65150 – MSRP $499

 Primos-Double-Bull-SurroundView-270SurroundView 270°

  • Dimensions: 55 in x 55 in x 70 in
  • Weight: 21 lbs. w/bag
  • 7 shoot-through ports
  • 3 max view openings
  • Legendary Double Bull materials and construction
  • TRUTH camo specifically designed to hide ground blinds in any terrain

SurroundView 270° – Model No. 65151 – MSRP: $399

Primos-Double-Bull-SurroundView-180SurroundView 180°

  • Dimensions: 48 in x 48 in x 65 in
  • Weight: 19 lbs. w/bag
  • 7 shoot-through ports
  • 3 max view openings
  • Legendary Double Bull materials and construction
  • TRUTH camo specifically designed to hide ground blinds in any terrainModel

SurroundView 180° – Model No. 65152 – MSRP: $299


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Inside-Primos-Double-Bull-SurroundView-360

Pre-SHOT Show fun with a Fave at the Range

Each year outdoor media and industry professionals make a great migration to the Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor, Trade Show (SHOT Show) and for us, it kicks off at the range before the show-floor actually opens. SHOT Show is presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) who boasts the largest convention crowds of any show. I’ll be scouring the aisles for outdoor and hunting items and share them with you. If there’s anything you’d like to see, let me know in the comments below or on social media sites.

Today I’ll share one of my favorite things from my day one, which is the NSSF’s Industry Day at the Range. Much of my time is usually consumed with meetings, networking, and the like, but I did get to demo some great guns, which I’ll share later, but first here’s one that gets a nod as a fave. (Yes, I did have more than one fave.)

Phone Skope is a company that introduced an attachment for your binoculars and spotting scopes, which allows you to hook your phone on and zoom in to take fabulous images. Digiscoping has since grown immensely as phone cameras have improved, and friends everywhere are taking phenomenal images using the Phone Skope and their phones.

This year Phone Skope had a huge presence at Range Day, giving media and industry professionals Phone Skope kits. I did receive one and will do an unboxing at a later date when I’m back home. It’s definitely cool to receive a digiscoping kit that will adhere to my Swarovski Optiks binoculars, spotting scope, as well as rifle scopes.

Speaking of rifle scopes, what I’m looking forward to is actually a new attachment that Phone Skope will begin shipping during the summer of 2018. It’s an attachment that will go on the side of your rifle scope. It’s angled, has a single mirror, and allows the shooter to actually look through the scope as their phone is mounted to the side and film their own shots.

Since I do teach hunter ed, as well as basic firearms courses, I have to tell everyone, your scope should not be used as a binocular, but with this attachment actually allows you to point your firearm at what you intend to shoot and record your shot at the same time. This is not just for those of you who are famous and have TV shows. I look forward to using it with students, when sighting in rifles, and even on hunts.

With students, and when sighting in rifles, I’ll be able to play back the shot and see where they were holding, whether they were steady or not, and if they pulled the trigger. This is going to be wonderful for sighting in my own rifles or a client’s!

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Since I mentioned hunting, have you ever been on a hunt, shot at your elk, and it bolted? If you’ve been following my elk hunting stories, an elk bolted because he was chocked full of rutting-mad adrenaline. For me, on that hunt, he didn’t go far, but sometimes they can disappear into the dark timber making for a day or more of blood-trailing. If you recorded the shot, you could do a playback, see where your shot hit and know if you need to let it rest or start beating brush. (More about that later.)

The Phone Skope mounting device will be released in early Summer of 2018. It’s a universal mount that will fit most rifle scopes. It aligns your parallel to the rifle and scope and will have an attachment to fit most cell phones.

One thing I will note is that the device does extend the scope approximately 1-1/4″ (I didn’t take a tape measure to the range) so you may need to adjust your eye relief so you don’t get scoped when you’re shooting.

I’ll be sharing more of what I saw and shot at the range in the next few days or weeks. For now, I’m headed to meetings, press conferences and to explore the floor. Stay tuned!

*This is not a paid or sponsored article.


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