RMEF Funding Benefits Colorado Elk

It’s nice to see some of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s funding go toward local elk habitat and research needs.

Funding Benefits Colorado Elk Habitat, Research

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation awarded $212,707 in grant funding for 16 habitat enhancement, research and hunting heritage projects in Colorado.

Those projects benefit nearly 15,000 acres of habitat for elk and other wildlife in Archuleta, Chaffee, Conejos, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Huerfano, Mineral, Montrose, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Rio Grande and Saguache Counties. There is also one project of statewide benefit.

“There is an ongoing need to apply active forest management techniques like prescribed burning and forest thinning across Colorado elk country. Such conservation work enhances wildlife habitat but it also improves overall forest health,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Grant funding will also assist scientific research to help managers track and better manage elk herds.”

RMEF has nearly 17,000 members and 28 chapters in Colorado. RMEF volunteers generated the funding by hosting banquets, membership drives and other events.

Since 1987, RMEF and its partners completed 728 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Colorado with a combined value of more than $167 million. These projects protected or enhanced 448,691 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 107,992 acres.

Here is a sampling of projects, listed by county:

Archuleta County—

Apply noxious weed treatments across 300 acres of meadows, including elk calving grounds, within the upper portion of the First Fork of Piedra River drainage on the San Juan National Forest.

Gunnison County—

Provide funding to capture and collar 30-40 elk to assist biologists and game managers as they learn more about grazing, hunting, habitat and other factors that affect the habits of migratory elk in the Gunnison National Forest and on Bureau of Land Management land (also benefits Saguache County).

Montrose County—

Restore a non-functioning wildlife water development on the Uncompahgre Plateau that is elk winter range within the Uncompahgre National Forest.

Rio Blanco County—

Prescribe burn 10,000 acres in six to eight different burn areas across four ranger districts on the White River National Forest to benefit wildlife habitat and overall forest health (also benefits Garfield, Eagle and Pitkin Counties).

Go here for a full project listing.

Colorado project partners include the Arapaho, Rio Grande, San Isabel, San Juan, White River and Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and various sportsmen, civic and outdoor industry and business groups.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org, elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Standing Up to a Warrior Elk #MeandMyHunt

It’s difficult to choose a favorite elk hunt because I’ve had many an adventure while pursuing them. I recently shared a story of my uncle’s “impactful” elk hunt and it makes me think of another that was nearly just that — Impact. While hunting elk to fill the freezer, a big slobbering bull nearly made impact with little ol’ me. Read about it below, and tell me about some of your close encounters in the comments below.

It was the second day of season, and in the darkness of the morning, we rode the horses across a river to where we’d spotted bulls the day before. As the sun began to light up the sky, I let out a small bugle, a locator call. Most times other bulls will “honor” you with an answer, saying “Hey bud, I’m over here.” As I lowered my call we waited for the sound of another bull.

We’d almost shrugged them off when we heard three bulls answer from the area just south of us, and then others sounded off in the distance.

We looked at one another and silently said, “Game on,” then continued to ride in the direction of the elk, cow calling here and there, waiting for a sign.

We heard a cow calling and decided to dismount and tie the horses. Now we’d hunt a-foot. We’d made it no further than 25 yards from the horses when we saw it. Through the oak brush, we could see that there were two bulls fighting over a cow. We decided to use the brush as cover and get closer to size up the bulls.

We edged through the brush then came to a small clearing and tried to get through quickly so we could stay out of sight. Suddenly another cow jumped through directly in front of us. I froze. She was followed by a nice 5×5 bull that was obviously pushing her, and ready to bread.

We hesitated as we could see another bull on the other side of the brush. He looked a bit larger. We contemplated our next move. That is when I saw movement directly to my right. Something was coming. I spun around to see.

A larger bull charged in from the side of the meadow. We turned, and there he was. I was standing in the middle of the clearing with no cover. H whispered, “don’t move!” I stood there, 20 feet from him trembling. I was excited, nervous and scared! The bull and I looked each other in the eye, him glaring fiercely at me. I could see his nostrils flaring, snot dripping from his nose, as he took deep breaths and trying to smell me and figure out what I was.

My gun was up and ready but my scope was turned up from the day before. (heck, at this distance I wouldn’t need a scope!) I stood there staring at him as he huffed at me. H whispered, “SHOOT HIM!” I tried to talk but couldn’t. Paralyzed, I whispered back, “I CAN’T SEE!”

All in one motion, H reached over, dialed my scope all the way down and jumped to the oak brush before that angry bull could run him over. I stood there holding my rifle up, and my arms trembled. I tried to brace myself, steadying my arms into my waist. Then my legs shook!  The voice inside my head, “Steady, steady!!!” The bulls sides swelled and collapsed with anger.

I looked through my scope and finally snapped, “LOOK DOWN THE BARREL!” I told myself. The bull snorted and began to step, then — a deep breath and a shot!

The mighty bull spun and ran, plummetting at the edge of the meadow. His adrenaline and ferocity got him on he feet again, and I took another shot, this time broadside. He fell and we headed toward him. We proceeded with caution as those antlers can be dangerous weapons, especially in the case of an adrenaline pumped, rutting bull. As I approached, I noticed a broken antler.

I whispered to H, “Oh my gosh. I shot his antler off.” thinking that in my tremoring, I’d made a bad shot.

We edged closer and I poked him with the barrel of my rifle. He didn’t move. Once we knew it was safe, we examined him a little more closely. His antler had been broken for some time. He was a fighter. He broke off on his right side, just above his G3.  He also had broken eye guards. To think of how mighty this bull had been, and that I was almost his next target is amazing.

When we caped him out, we notice he even has a hole in his skull where he had been gored by another bull! WOW! It had been scabbed over for some time. I wonder if he got that battle wound when he broke that right side. What a mighty bull, and to think, I stood there, just 20 feet in front of him, staring him down. — Surreal!!!

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An Impactful Elk Hunt — #MeandMyHunt

New Mexico Bull Elk Hunt

The part about hunting that non-hunters may not understand is that it isn’t about killing. It’s about life. It’s about sustenance. It’s about family. It’s about conservation of all things, including wildlife and human beings.

I have so many favorite hunts that I cannot remember which one I would list at the top. They are all grand in their own unique ways. When I’m called to declare one that is impactful or that made a difference in my life, I scan through the decades of files. My mind lands on one in particular. It’s not a memory of me killing a 6×6 Colorado bull elk or a big typical muley.

New Mexico Bull Elk Hunt

While it’s difficult to declare just one hunt as the one that made a difference in my life, there is one from my childhood that I remember with adoration, and it seated the knowledge I knew within. The knowledge we get from our ancestors. The wisdom from generations before.

You see, as a child, my dad moved us to a small rural town in Southwest Colorado. The populations had to have been less than a couple thousand. Mom worked summers for the U.S. Forest Service, and Dad’s work in construction seemed a bit seasonal as well.

Those were hard times financially, but that’s when I learned the most about life. Mom sewed clothes, crocheted afghans, and grew a garden. We had chickens, goats, and other small livestock, which the family would butcher for food, but the real celebrations were when dad would bring home a deer or elk.

The family would dress and process the wild game together. We all put the labor in to clean, cure, and then process the meat to put in the freezer for the long, cold winter months. There’s some sort of satisfaction that goes into that work, and then enjoying a steak in the middle of a snowed in February night.

That’s not the hunt though. That’s a way of life; a laborious way of life I continually appreciate.

Many years my dad’s cousins and friends would come to hunt the elk of Colorado. Many years we would have fun enjoying their company as they camped out in our yard, or on the floor of the main house. No matter the time of year, I remember dad building a campfire out back where we’d all circle around. They’d tell stories of the trials, tribulations, and successes of the hunts. Every year hunting season was a joy for all of us. Not always, but many years the season would close, and they would head home with no animal on which to put their hunting tags.

One of dad’s friends, who he’d met in kindergarten and I call my uncle, came year after year. He, his brother and his friends hunted hard. Sometimes one in their group would successfully take down an elk. They too shared the campfire stories, and one time he brought his son. My brother and I played in the hills while the adults visited. The next day he was blessed to tag along when one in his dad’s group got a nice 4×4 bull elk.

Year after year my uncle returned. While he’d taken cow elk (a female), he’d never taken a bull. He was determined to successfully tag one and continually worked toward the dream. As the years advanced, he gained a bit of weight, and his health deteriorated a bit, but it didn’t deter him from his quest.

One year he showed up, and his breathing was short. The doctor had put him on medication and suggested a healthy, low-fat diet. That year he couldn’t make the hikes up the steep San Juan Mountains. His brother, my dad, and their friend headed up the first short hill. Dad came back and asked if I was going to come. I declined and said I’d stay behind as well. I knew my uncle was feeling down. He still dreamed of tagging a bull and hoped his health would be better next year so he could get up there and go after them.

He and I sat on the tailgate of his pick up truck, at the bottom of a mountain draw, drinking coffee, warming our hands on the cups that chilly October morning, and watching the sun come up. Oh my, how one can never tire of the majesty of a morning sunrise over the Rockies! As the shadows came, the sun glistened, and we sat there, the coyotes’ song rang loud, echoing across the valley, announcing a new day. We looked at each other and smiled then continued to quietly tell stories, taking our binoculars and glassing occasionally, to see if we’d spy any elk in the vicinity.

We wondered how the others in the group were doing, and I could see the weight on my “uncle’s” mind. He told stories of past hunts, hiking to the highest peaks, seeing horned owls, bears, and other wildlife, and a time when his horse took him to close to a tree. He laughed saying he was lazy and thought he’d simply break off the branch before him, but the branch was stout. Before he knew it, he rolled off the back of the horse and found himself laying on the ground. We shared a good chuckle and refilled our coffee from his thermos.

As we sat there smiling on the tailgate, we caught movement out of the corner of our eyes. We raised our binoculars and spied a herd of cow elk descending from the oak brush toward the meadow before us. We turned to look at each other in amazement. We thought, “Could this really be happening?”

Before the elk could clear the brush, he grabbed his rifle, and we slowly crouched to the ground, getting into a prone position. We knew the cows would be first, and we hoped a bull would follow. As he readied his rifle, resting it on his pack, I glassed further up the mountain into the oak brush to see if I could spy antlers.

The oak brush is thick, and it always amazes me at how quietly an elk can maneuver through. Since the branches are nearly as tall as they are you sometimes don’t even hear or see them until they emerge in a sparse area. I knew I needed to scan for movement or antlers that look like branches. Then I saw them! — Antlers!

I whispered, “I see a bull.” My uncle shuffled his position. I explained how far above, the direction he’s coming, and where I thought he’d emerge. Uncle readied, moving his rifle in the direction I’d indicated. I notified him when the bull would stop and when he’d begin down the hill again.

Before long there were more than a dozen cow elk feeding in the middle of the meadow. We waited patiently as we watched the bull emerge, clear the brush and then begin to feed out into the meadow. Uncle was patient. He waited for the elk to turn broadside, and then for him to move his front leg forward, and then he took his shot.

I watched through my binoculars as the big 6×6 bull spun, attempted to run, and then fell to the ground. After years of working so hard, he’d finally tagged a bull elk, and it wasn’t just a legal bull. It was a beautiful 6×6; every elk hunter’s dream. The cows scattered up the mountain, and we lay there in the dirt, in awe.

I looked over and saw the most massive smile I’d ever seen. The disappointment of not being able to climb the mountain had dispersed, and a tear of happiness filled my uncle’s eye.

He and I field dressed the bull, and when dad and his other friends returned there were huge smiles all around, lots of high fives, and congratulations, and still that tear in my uncle’s eye. We all loaded it into the truck, took it home and readied it to hang and cure. That night we shared fellowship and celebrated with elk tenderloin. The celebration was not only about his success but about health, happiness, and the meals his family would have.

We’d spent quality time together, watched that beautiful sunrise over those majestic mountains, listened to the coyotes’ song, watched hawks soar, and witnessed the incredible stealthiness of a massive animal. We helped one another, and despite my uncle’s health, we’d filled his hunting license. He and his family would have a freezer full of organic, low-fat meat. Hunting is about life, sustenance, family, friends, and conservation of all things, including animals and human beings.

Although I knew that hunting animals isn’t about killing, that season, it became even more evident. It’s about overcoming obstacles, finding sustenance, being skillful, and sometimes it’s about chance.


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Elk Hunting Opportunities Available in New Mexico

If you’re still looking for a way to fill the freezer, a New Mexico elk hunt might be right up your alley. Read below to learn how you can get an archery license.

Late-season archery elk licenses available Oct. 25

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – There will be 275 first-come, first-served late-season bull elk archery hunting licenses on sale beginning Oct. 25 on the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish website.

The sale will begin at 10 a.m. and will be open only to New Mexico residents for the first 24 hours, after which any remaining licenses will be available to everyone. Only hunters who did not hold a 2017-2018 elk license are eligible. The bag limit for the late-season hunts is one bull elk with antlers having at least six points on one side.

Hunters are advised to obtain an online customer account or review their existing account, including user name and password, before the sale begins. The sale is online-only and hunts normally sell out seconds after becoming available.

Available licenses include: Game Management Unit 12, Nov. 18-22, 25 licenses; Unit 34, Dec. 16-20, 200 licenses; and Unit 37, Dec. 2-6, 50 licenses.

Special restrictions for elk harvested in Unit 34 can be found on page 83 of the current New Mexico Hunting Rules and Information booklet. To review the regulations or purchase a hunt, visit www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

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To be eligible to buy a license, hunters must previously have purchased either a Game Hunting or Game Hunting and Fishing license. Those licenses, along with Habitat Improvement Stamps and Habitat Management Access Validations, also can be obtained through online accounts.

Hunters planning to purchase a license must have completed all mandatory 2016-2017 harvest reporting requirements or their purchase will be rejected in the post-sale audit. The license fee, but not the application fee will be refunded on rejected purchases.

The department makes late-season elk licenses available as biologists assess annual population and harvest information, regional herd management objectives and additional harvest needs.


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Elk and Deer Herd Planning San Juan Mountains – Colorado

Colorado hunters are constantly discussing the management of elk and deer herds in their areas. However, it seems this discussion usually happens at camp or in the local coffee shop. If you’re one of these people, who has something to say about Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s management in your area, you need to start attending the public meetings to have your voice heard by someone who can do something about it.

There is an upcoming meeting regarding the management in units 80 and 81, which include the South San Juan mountains of the San Luis Valley. You’ll find detailed information below. If this is an area you like to hunt, check the dates and maybe you’ll be able to attend one or both meetings. Don’t forget to share the information with your hunting buddies.

Public input needed by CPW for elk and deer herd planning in Game Management Units 80, 81 in South San Juan mountains of the San Luis Valley

CPW_SiteLogoMONTE VISTA, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is evaluating big-game management in the South San Juan mountain area and the public is invited to upcoming meetings where issues and plans for Game Management Units 80 and 81 will be discussed.

The meetings will be at:
7 p.m., July 13, in La Jara at Centauri High School, 17889 U.S. Highway 285
7 p.m., July 14, at the Monte Vista Co-Op, U.S. Highway 160, about a mile east of Monte Vista.

“CPW is reaching out to the public, including landowners, sportsmen, outfitters, business owners, and anyone who is interested in deer and elk in the San Luis Valley to attend one of these meetings and offer input,” said Rick Basagoitia, Area Wildlife Manager. “These animals are an important public resource and CPW intends to manage them for the benefit of all stakeholders.”

Every ten years Colorado Parks and Wildlife terrestrial biologists update big-game management plans which take into consideration a variety of factors, including: hunter perception, harvest history habitat availability, agricultural conflicts, forest management plans and social issues.  At the meeting CPW staff will talk about what is known currently about the deer and elk herds in the area, and the history of planning efforts.  Public input is needed to help CPW draft the management plan that will set goals for the most-desired population, sex-ratio objectives and the amount of hunting opportunity that will be available in the area for the next decade. All stakeholder input will be considered and combined with biological data to inform a revised management plan.

For those who can’t attend the meeting, comments can be made on line starting July 13 atcpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/HerdManagementPlans.aspx. The survey will be available for 30 days.

The planning process will take about a year. A draft of the plan will be presented to the public in the fall.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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Youth Encouragement Elk Hunting Licenses

Hunting elk is a wildlife management tool which needs to be shared with the next generation. This year I’d like to present you with the challenge of taking a new hunter out in the woods. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) will soon begin the sale of their youth encouragement licenses. This is your opportunity to introduce others to the elk hunting experience. Tell me, who have you shared the hunt with? ~Mia


Youth encouragement elk hunting licenses for sale

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – More than 1,900 youth, antlerless elk licenses will go on sale through the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish’s Online License System at 10 a.m. July 5.

The sale is designed to encourage youth hunting and includes almost 1,500 licenses for hunters using any legal weapon and 390 licenses for hunters using a muzzleloader or bow.

Licenses will be sold online only on a first-come, first-served basis. To purchase a license, customers will need to log in to their Online License System account at www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

Eligibility requirements:

  • For the first 14 days, the sale is open only to N.M. resident youths who have applied in the current license year for one or more draw hunts for deer, elk, antelope, bighorn sheep, oryx or ibex and were not successful for any hunt. Please note that the purchase of a leftover draw hunt for deer counts as a successful deer application.
  • Must have a valid Hunter Education certification.
  • Must be under 18 years old on the opening day of hunt.

Beginning at 10 a.m., July 19, the sale will open to all eligible youths, regardless of residency, who did not draw a 2016-17 elk license, whether they applied or not.

Hunters must have a current Junior Game Hunting or a Junior Game Hunting and Fishing license prior to purchasing an elk license. Customers without a Game Hunting license will be directed to purchase one before continuing to the youth encouragement sale.

All purchases will be audited to verify the customer’s eligibility.

Hunters planning to purchase a youth encouragement license must have completed all mandatory 2016-2017 harvest reporting requirements or their purchase will be rejected in the post-sale audit. The license fee, but not the application fee will be refunded on rejected purchases. After eligibility is verified, licenses will be awarded to hunters and will be available to print and view within a few days of purchase. Licenses can be printed from any computer by logging in to an account and selecting “My Purchases” in the main menu.

For more information about the youth encouragement elk license sale, hunting in New Mexico, or for help logging in, please call customer service at (888) 248-6866. Youth encouragement licenses will not be sold over the phone. For the list of available hunts please see the 2017-2018 Hunting Rules and Information booklet available online at www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

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RMEF Celebrates 33rd Anniversary

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RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is commemorating 33 years of carrying out its conservation mission to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.

“We are deeply indebted to and grateful for men and women who had the foresight, energy and perseverance to establish this organization for the benefit of elk and elk country,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “They sacrificed much for a big game mammal that today is the thriving majestic symbol of our nation’s wild country.”

Founded on May 14, 1984, by four elk hunters in northwest Montana, RMEF began operations in a modest trailer in the middle of a field. At that time, there were approximately 550,000 elk in North America. Today, there are more than one million elk from coast-to-coast.

 

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As of December 31, 12016, RMEF and its partners carried out 10,469 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects that conserved or enhanced 7,111,358 acres. It also opened or secured access to 1,105,667 acres. Additionally, RMEF assisted with successful elk reintroductions in seven states and one Canadian province. 

RMEF now has more than 222,000 thousand members and more than 500 chapters across the United States.

“We appreciate our volunteers, members and partners as well as sportsmen and women who support the RMEF. It is because of them that we are able to accelerate our mission across elk country,” added Allen.

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

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World Record Typical American Elk Receives Coveted Award

pope and young logo greenChatfield, MN – Steve Felix of Seeley Lake, Montana has been awarded the coveted Pope & Young Club’s Ishi’ Award. This is the highest honor the Pope and Young Club can bestow upon a bowhunter.

In 1962, the Pope and Young Club introduced the idea for a special bowhunting award, named in honor of Ishi since he had instilled in Saxton Pope and Art Young the love of the bow and its use as an efficient hunting tool. This honor is awarded only when a truly outstanding North American big game trophy animal is deserving of recognition.

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“The Ishi Award is one of bowhunting’s highest honors, said Ed Fanchin, Records Chairman for the Pope And Young Club. “The Pope and Young Club only presents this award out when a truly outstanding North American big game trophy animal is deserving of recognition. This year the Pope And Young Club awarded the honor to the Typical American elk taken by Stephen Felix. The massive bulls score, the Fair Chase hunt on public land and the story behind how Stephen Felix harvested this exceptional animal all make this incredible trophy truly deserving of the Ishi Award.

Fred Bear designed the award with assistance from Chuck Kroll. The Ishi award plaque was originally made from very fine, select grade rosewood nearly perfect in color, grain and texture donated to the Club by Fred himself.  When that supply was depleted, the Club selected pieces of fine Yew and Osage Orange wood from Glenn St. Charles’s personal wood box to form the plaque. The final touch is the specially made obsidian spear point, fashioned by past Pope and Young Club President, Roger Atwood.  The hand chipped point is mounted on the Yew and Osage plaque and trimmed with genuine goatskin, along with an engraved metal plate to complete the treasured Ishi Award.

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Steve’s newly crowned World Record American Elk is truly an outstanding animal with a score of 430 0/8; this monarch is over 17″ above the previous World Record taken in 2005 and very deserving of bowhunting’s most rare and distinctive award.

The Pope and Young Club is a non-profit North American conservation and bowhunting organization dedicated to the promotion and protection of our bowhunting heritage, hunting ethics and wildlife conservation.  The Club also maintains the universally recognized repository for the records and statistics on North American big game animals harvested with a bow and arrow.

Contact the Pope & Young Club office at:

www.pope-young.org or P.O. Box 548, Chatfield, MN 55923, Ph: 507.867.4144


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RMEF 2017 World Elk Calling Championship

WHOOWHEE! The sound of bugling bulls gets elk hunters excited! Listen to this.

Langley Claims 2017 World Elk Calling Championship

RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—Bryan Langley outdueled friendly rival Corey Jacobsen to claim first place in the professional division at the 2017 World Elk Calling Championships in Salt Lake City, Utah, presented by the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the International Sportsmen’s Expositions.

“It feels pretty good. It’s been awhile. Corey and I have gone back and forth every year,” said Langley. “The first sequence I felt that my call was breaking up a little bit so I switched to a different call and I felt like I hit all the notes I needed to.”

Langley is a three-time champion in the professional division having also won titles in 2012 and 2013. He also won the men’s division in 2009.

Jacobsen has five pro division titles to his credit. He also won the men’s division in 1998 and the adult division in 1995. Additionally, Jacobsen won the Champion of the Champions invitational in 2013 that featured previous pro division winners from the first 25 World Elk Calling Championships.

Langley’s family also shined in 2017. Bryan’s oldest son, Brayden, competed in the men’s division for the first time while younger siblings Moriah, Gavin and Abram dominated the pee wee division by finishing first, second and fifth respectively.

Seventy-eight contestants, the most to take part since 2005, competed in six different divisions.

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2017 World Elk Calling Championships winners:

Professional Division
Bryan Langley, McMinnville, Oregon
Corey Jacobsen, Boise, Idaho
Cody McCarthy, Post Falls, Idaho

Men’s Division
Damian Pagano, Rexburg, Idaho
Dirk Durham, Orofino, Idaho
Matt Toyn, Harrisville, Utah

Women’s Division
Lydia Smith, Rigby, Idaho
Misty Jacobsen, Vacaville, California
Jamie McCarthy, Post Falls, Idaho

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Voice Division
Hannah Holiday, Northglenn, Colorado
Paul Griffiths, Somers, Montana
Kailee Brimmer, Keno, Oregon

Youth Division
Jacob Simper, Tooele, Utah
Joseph Simper, Tooele, Utah
Hunter Lewis, Herriman, Utah

Pee Wee Division
Moriah Langley, McMinnville, Oregon
Gavin Langley, McMinnville, Oregon
Fisher Lewis, Herriman, Utah

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


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300 Cow Elk Licenses Added to 2017-18 Draw – New Mexico Residents

300 cow elk licenses added to 2017-18 draw;
residents only

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – The Department of Game and Fish has added 300 more hunting licenses for antlerless elk in Game Management Unit 34 in southeastern New Mexico to this year’s annual draw. Only New Mexico residents are eligible to apply for these licenses.

Applications currently are being accepted through the department online licensing system, www.wildlife.state.us, or by calling the Information Center, (888) 248-6866. Hunters who already have applied have the option of adding the new hunts to their applications by calling (888) 248-6866.

Licenses will be added to three hunts, all in the Sacramento Mountains east of Alamogordo in Game Management Unit 34:

  • ELK-1-310 – Nov. 25-29, 400 licenses (up from 300). Any legal sporting arm.
  • ELK-1-311 – Dec. 2-6, 400 licenses (up from 300). Any legal sporting arm.
  • ELK-1-312 – Dec. 9-13, 400 licenses (up from 300). Any legal sporting arm.

The deadline to apply is 5 p.m. March 22. The deadline to change applications by phone is 4:30 p.m. March 22.


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