6th Annual Wyoming Women’s Antelope

LARAMIE, WY – The Wyoming Women’s Foundation will host its 6th Annual Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt Oct. 11 – 14, 2018 at the Ranch at Ucross in northeastern Wyoming. Each year the event hosts women from all over the country through corporate sponsorships, scholarships and individuals. The foundation is seeking sponsors and individual hunters for this year’s event. Based on its level of contribution, each sponsor will have the opportunity to invite women to hunt at the event.

STEVE GIRT PHOTO

Founded in 2013, the country’s first all-women’s antelope hunt works to raise awareness and funds for the foundation’s mission to improve the economic self-sufficiency of Wyoming women. Since inception, the hunt has raised more than $345,000 to help carry out its work and has provided almost 200 hunts and engaged more than 100 partners and sponsors.

“When we started this hunt in 2013 we hoped for, but never imagined, the magnitude of the impact it would have on the hunters participating and for the Wyoming Women’s Foundation,” said retired Wyoming Supreme Court Justice Marilyn Kite who co-chairs the hunt planning committee. “The event also benefits the sport of hunting and conservation by recruiting more enthusiastic hunters and teaching ethical hunting practices.”

The hunt honors Wyoming’s traditions and culture by teaching women how to harvest, process and cook game meat. The event provides personal growth to participants through a focus on mentoring and developing camaraderie between women. Additionally, women go home with the skills to provide nutritious food to their families. Experienced hunters act as mentors and share their knowledge, experience and passion for hunting with a new or less experienced hunter. Each pair hunts with a guide. Hunters of all experience levels are welcome.

The weekend includes a fundraising auction dinner open to the public. The dinner will take place at the Ranch at Ucross on Friday, Oct. 12. State and local officials often attend the dinner in support of the event and the foundation. Tickets and dinner table sponsorships are available on the hunt website. The foundation is also seeking in-kind donations for the auction dinner on Oct. 12.

Please visit wyomingwomensantelopehunt.org and click on “participate” for more information on full event or dinner sponsorship and individual participation, including scholarships. The hunt expects to host 50 hunters in 2018.

About the Wyoming Women’s Foundation

The Wyoming Women’s Foundation is a priority fund of the, which granted out over $6 million to nonprofits across the state in 2016. The Women’s Foundation builds on a permanent endowment that will ensure funding to enhance the lives of women and girls in Wyoming for generations to come. It makes grants to organizations that help Wyoming women and girls attain economic self-sufficiency, creates statewide awareness of the barriers to economic self-sufficiency, and supports systems change to eliminate those barriers. Since its inception in 1999, the foundation has invested more than $832,000 into almost 100 organizations.

Learn more at http://wywf.org/.

Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt Scholarships Now Available!

Many of you are aware that last fall I served as a Media guest at the Wyoming Women’s Antelope hunt. It’s such an amazing experience, in which I wish all women could partake. Today I’m sharing their announcement, they’ve opened the scholarship application period. Check it out.
Cheers, Mia
Wyoming-Womens-Antelope-Hunt-2017-WWAHLARAMIE, WY – With the help of generous sponsors, the Wyoming Women’s Foundation offers scholarships for women interested in participating in the 2017 Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt. The scholarship application will be open April 1 – May 1, 2017. The hunt provides mentoring opportunities and helps bring awareness to the Wyoming Women’s Foundation and their mission to invest in economic self-sufficiency for women and girls of Wyoming.

The Wyoming Women’s Foundation will host more than 40 female hunters from across the nation on Oct. 12-15, 2017 at the Ranch at Ucross in northeast Wyoming for a weekend of hunting, mentorship and camaraderie. Through generous sponsorship, the foundation provides scholarships to a portion of its hunters each year. The scholarships cover all license, hunting and guide fees, lodging, meals, and post-hunt activities for four days and three nights. The only expense left up to the participant is travel to and from the event. Hunters of all skill levels are welcome, including first-time hunters. Hunters are divided into pairs and assigned a licensed guide and hunt on mostly private lands surrounding Ucross.

CLICK TO SHOP WOMEN’S HUNTING

Visit the participation page on the hunt website for more application information and to sign up for email notifications about scholarship opportunities. Click here for a direct link to the application! Submission includes a 300-word essay on why you would like to participate. Selections will include both seasoned and aspiring hunters to create pairings of mentors and mentees. Event sponsors and hunt alumni make it possible for the Wyoming Women’s Foundation to award up to one quarter of the 40 hunting spots to scholarship applicants. Starting May 15, applicants will be notified if they are selected.

The Wyoming Women’s Foundation created the Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt in 2013 when it became the first all-women’s pronghorn hunt in the nation. Since inception, the event has raised more than $280,000 to support the hunt and special projects that help women and girls across Wyoming.


Click here for photos of the 2016 Antelope Hunt!

Wyoming-Womens-Antelope-Hunt-WWAH-photos

http://tunein.com/embed/player/p963773/?autoplay=true


Wyoming-Womens-Foundation-WWAHWYWF is a priority fund of the Wyoming Community Foundation, which granted out more than $6.1 million to nonprofits across the state in 2015. The Women’s Foundation builds on a permanent endowment that will ensure funding to enhance the lives of women and girls in Wyoming for generations to come. It makes grants to organizations that help Wyoming women and girls attain economic self-sufficiency, creates statewide awareness of the barriers to economic self-sufficiency, and supports systems change to eliminate those barriers. Since its inception in 1999, the foundation has invested $832,000 into nearly 100 organizations.


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2017 Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt Dates Announced

2017 Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt will be held Oct. 12 – 15

LARAMIE, WY – Join the Wyoming Women’s Foundation for its 5th Annual Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt Oct. 12 – 15, 2017 at the Ranch at Ucross in northeastern Wyoming. Each year the event hosts 40 women from all over the country supported by corporate sponsorships, scholarships and individual hunters. The foundation is seeking sponsors for this year’s event. Based on its level of contribution, each sponsor will have the opportunity to invite women to hunt at the event.Founded in 2013, the country’s first all-women’s antelope hunt works to raise awareness and funds for the foundation’s mission to improve the economic self-sufficiency of Wyoming women. Since inception, it has raised more than $280,000 to help carry out its work. The hunt benefits participants through a focus on mentoring and developing camaraderie between women. Experienced hunters act as mentors and share their knowledge, experience and passion for hunting with a new or less experienced hunter. Each pair hunts with a guide. Hunters of all experience levels are welcome.

“In the past four years this event has grown into a truly powerful tradition for women–and for Wyoming,” said retired Wyoming Supreme Court Justice Marilyn Kite who co-chairs the hunt planning committee. “We look forward to continuing the tradition for the fifth year–and hopefully long into the future.”

The hunt honors Wyoming’s hunting traditions and culture while also teaching women how to harvest, process and cook the game meat. Skills learned at the event help women provide nutritious food to their families.

The weekend includes a fundraising auction dinner open to the public. The dinner will take place at the Ranch at Ucross on Friday, Oct. 13. State and local officials often attend the dinner in support of the event and the foundation. Tickets and dinner table sponsorships are available on the hunt website. The foundation is also seeking in-kind donations for the auction dinner on Oct. 13.

Please visit wyomingwomensantelopehunt.org for more information on full event or dinner sponsorship and individual participation, including scholarships.

 

About the Wyoming Women’s Foundation
The Wyoming Women’s Foundation is a priority fund of the Wyoming Community Foundation, which granted out over $6 million to nonprofits across the state in 2016. The Women’s Foundation builds on a permanent endowment that will ensure funding to enhance the lives of women and girls in Wyoming for generations to come. It makes grants to organizations that help Wyoming women and girls attain economic self-sufficiency, creates statewide awareness of the barriers to economic self-sufficiency, and supports systems change to eliminate those barriers. Since its inception in 1999, the foundation has invested $832,000 into almost 100 organizations. Learn more at www.wywf.org

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How To Determine if the Antelope is a “Shooter”

Antelope hunters know that we can look up the definitions of what antelope are legal to harvest. As we head out into the field, is the game department’s description the only criteria we use to determine if the buck is a shooter?

“Shooter” – What is a shooter? Well, there is the legal definition, which varies from state to state. Then there is the boundary, which we hunters set above that. My definition will probably vary from yours, and ours from others who hunt.

Let me start by saying that today I’m referring to archery hunting. I have a favorite antelope spot, but I haven’t drawn a tag there in a couple years. That being said, I’ve had to resort to hunting new areas, which include both public and private land.


Get outside. Explore, learn, hunt, fish, shoot, connect with nature. ~Mia


Public land tends to be pressured much more than private, so there is some appeal to hearing a landowner say, “You can hunt on my property.” In addition to there being fewer hunters on private land, in my experience, you also have an in place scout. If they occupy their land, the landowners see what’s going on day in and day out. They see what’s coming and going, and can be a great set of eyeballs when you live half a day away.

This year the land I received permission to hunt was suited as just a scenario. I received reports from the land owner, “I’m seeing bucks, but nothing big.” and “Today I saw a shooter.” With the mixed reviews, I needed to take a couple days to go see for myself. The family loaded up and we headed east for a few days before season began.

Antelope-bucks-pronghorn-Mia-Anstine-photoOn day one, we saw a group of four bucks. One or two may have even been of legal “shooter” size. In my opinion, which matched the land owner’s, they were not shooters. Those boys needed to grow up.

The next day, we spent hours driving and glassing, in search of more mature antelope bucks. We saw one mature buck on an adjacent property, but these parcels are rather large, and the chances of that buck making his way down to the piece we’d hunt remained questionable.

After many hours behind the Swarovskis, we decided to make our hunting plan on the drive home. We chose to hunt the south end of the property, closest to the parcels where we’d seen the mature animals.

Opening day, we glassed and sat water holes. (Sitting waterholes… That’s another story.) We spied a couple does with their fawns trailing behind. Other than that, the day pretty much included bugs, dust, and a nice cool breeze. (That’s the other story. The weather wasn’t helping the hunt.)

Finally, we saw the buck that may have been a “shooter.” This guy would be a prize to any archery antelope hunter. Actually, just tagging an antelope with your bow, period, is a prize, but as a conservationist, we sometimes pass on decent “shooters.”

From the blind, we eyeballed this buck. He wasn’t within bow range, (Actually, he was more than way out of bow range on the other property.) so we assessed him (okay mass, prong almost as tall as his ears, slight curl, not much spread, bow worthy) and contemplated what we would do if he came near.


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Antelope-buck-pronghorn-Mia-Anstine-photo“Shoot or Pass?”

What would you do? This is the only mature buck we, and the landowner, have seen in weeks. If he comes before your blind on opening day, do you shoot him or pass?

I say, “Pass.” You ask, “Why?” Well, because it’s opening day. There’s always the saying, “Never pass on anything the first day, that you wouldn’t shoot on the last day.” I don’t always live by this mantra because I love to hunt.

I enjoy being out there. I enjoy the time, seeing does with their curious fawns. The adrenaline rush of being unseen by a young buck, whose horns are no taller than his ears. Seeing the bugs, seeing other wildlife, even watching the cattle. All of this is why I enjoy being out there and also part of why I hunt. Other than being a legal hunter, it’s not about the size at all for me.

Another reason I say, “Pass” is because this is the only mature buck we’ve seen for miles. Although this guy is mature, he’s still on the young side. He needs to grow up some more. This land obviously needs a rest from the hunting pressure.

And YES, sometimes passing means you end up with tag soup, but I’m okay with that. On that note, we’re headed home (Lea starts school tomorrow), and we’ll make another trip back to hunt the public land.


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Support for Youth at Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt

Groathouse Construction, Inc. sponsors youth at Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt

Laramie, Wyo. – Wanting to ensure hunting stays a tradition in the Cowboy State, Groathouse Construction, Inc. has stepped forward to sponsor a youth hunter from Cody at this year’s Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt.

Antelope-hunter-youth-Wyoming-Womens-Antelope-Hunt-WWAH
Katie Couture was introduced to hunting by her father Ron, who was excited to pass the tradition down to her. Pictured here is Katie with a mule deer she harvested, with her father next to her.

Katie Courture, who will be a sophomore at Cody High School this year, will join female hunters from across the nation for a weekend of hunting, mentorship, and camaraderie, as well as raising funds and awareness for the Wyoming Women’s Foundation. About 40 women hunters are expected to participate in this year’s hunt, which will be held Oct. 6-9 at the Ranch at Ucross in northeast Wyoming. To learn more, visit www.wyomingwomensantelopehunt.org.

 

CLICK TO SHOP SPOTTING SCOPES

Katie loves to be outdoors “adventuring” anytime she can. Hunting is a passion that runs deep in the family. She was introduced to hunting by her father Ron, who was excited to pass the tradition down to her. Katie has not only been successful hunting with her rifle but is a successful bow hunter as well. She is a member of the National Honor Society. When she’s not at school or hunting, she is a competitive figure skater with a local club in Cody. She qualified and competed at the National Competition “State Games of America” in Lincoln, Nebraska in 2015 and is now a two-time qualifier as she has qualified again for the 2017 “State Games of America” in Grand Rapids Michigan in 2017.

 


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Katie is very excited to be a part of this year’s hunt. “It will be such a unique experience, a once in a lifetime opportunity to meet so many successful women with a passion for the outdoors and hunting.”

She thanked Groathouse Construction for their sponsorship. “The support and time that Groathouse Construction puts into youth activities and organizations is amazing, not to mention their continued support for hunting and conservation in general. They continue to create opportunities for kids to get outdoors and enjoy what’s around them. It will be such an honor to hunt and represent them this year.”

“We are pleased to sponsor Katie, continue to support this fundraiser that helps women and girls across Wyoming, and help pass down our treasured hunting heritage to the next generation,” said Cayde O’Brien, Preconstruction Manager at Groathouse Construction, which is the largest Wyoming owned construction firm in the region.

Groathouse Construction has been a supporter of the hunt since the Wyoming Women’s Foundation created the event – the first of its kind in the nation – in 2013. Thanks to its supporters like Groathouse Construction so far the annual event has raised more than $200,000 for grants and special projects to help women and girls across Wyoming.

“The Wyoming Women’s Foundation appreciates Groathouse Construction’s continued support for the hunt and its willingness to sponsor a youth hunter this year,” said Rebekah Smith, Program Associate with the Wyoming Women’s Foundation. “Katie’s mother Heather hunted with us in 2014, and we are so excited to have Katie join us this year. Our hunt provides a unique opportunity for experienced women hunters to mentor new ones and, ultimately, encourage more women to reap the benefits of hunting.”


Note: I will be attending this year’s WWAH on behalf of Women’s Outdoor News, as Barbara Baird did last year. Remington Arms Company is sponsoring my trip.


This year the hunt will welcome Donna Boddington from the television show “The Boddington Experience” as a special guest hunter. Special guest hunters have included retired Wyoming Supreme Court Justice Marilyn Kite, Wyoming State Superintendent Jillian Balow, Jana Waller from “Skull Bound TV” on the Sportsman Channel, Women’s Outdoor News (WON) Editor Barbara Baird, 2013 Ms. Wheelchair USA Ashlee Lundvall, and Julie Golob, captain of Smith & Wesson’s highly successful shooting team. Of the 40 total hunters in 2015, 36 harvested antelope, 11 for the first time.

Katie Couture was introduced to hunting by her father Ron, who was excited to pass the tradition down to her. Pictured here is Katie with a mule deer she harvested, with her father next to her.

About the Wyoming Women’s Foundation

The Wyoming Women’s Foundation is a priority fund of the Wyoming Community Foundation, which granted out over $6.1 million to nonprofits across the state in 2015. The Women’s Foundation builds on a permanent endowment that will ensure funding to enhance the lives of women and girls in Wyoming for generations to come. It makes grants to organizations that help Wyoming women and girls attain economic self-sufficiency, creates statewide awareness of the barriers to economic self-sufficiency, and supports systems change to eliminate those barriers. Since its inception in 1999, the foundation has invested $775,000 into almost 100 organizations. Learn more at www.wywf.org


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Antelope Hunts and Decoys by Flambeau Outdoors

Did I mention, this fall I’ll be headed one state north, to the Wyoming Women’s Antelope Hunt? If not, then you’ve now been notified. I’m truly looking forward to meeting new hunters and mentoring those who will become hunters. Just prior to this hunt, the Little Gal and I will again pursue the speed goats on the Eastern Plains of Colorado.

Prior to the WWAH, the Little Gal and I will again pursue the speed goats on the Eastern Plains of Colorado. Today I received a note from a friend saying Flambeau is coming out with a new antelope decoy. I’m hoping to give it a try on our antelope hunt in Colorado. ~Mia

 

CLICK TO SHOP FLAMBEAU DECOY PRODUCTS

 


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Antelope-Decoy-by-Flambeau-OutdoorsMIDDLEFIELD, OHIO – Experienced pronghorn antelope hunters can’t help but grin when they see one – the Flambeau Commandelope, now back by popular demand and available exclusively at Cabela’s.

Portable and sturdy, this simple but effective decoy is key for luring wary goats into bow range. Commandelope features an integrated handle and a unique, trifold design. It can be deployed silently in either a standing or bedded position with the included stake.

“We brought back the Commandelope because it stands up to the wind much better than some of the lighter weight decoys out there that can flutter around like kites and even fly away on the windy plains,” said Flambeau Outdoors Marketing Director Kim Norton. “After it was discontinued for a while, we started seeing it popping up in the forums. Guys were looking for a way to get their hands on an old Commandelope and willing to pay top dollar, so we decided to bring it out of retirement.”

Sturdy yet easy to carry, the Commandelope decoy weighs in under seven pounds and will retail for $89.99. Available late summer.


ABOUT FLAMBEAU OUTDOORS

Flambeau, Inc. is a member of Nordic Group of Companies, Ltd. Nordic Group (headquartered in Baraboo, Wisconsin) is a privately held holding company consisting of subsidiaries with 22 facilities and 23 marketing units around the world with over 2,400 associates. Nordic Group companies manufacture and distribute plastic, seating and transportation products worldwide for industrial, commercial and consumer markets. Flambeau Outdoors, a division of Flambeau, Inc., is a widely recognized manufacturer of quality, innovative outdoor products for the hunting and fishing enthusiast. Flambeau Outdoors is located in Middlefield, Ohio.



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Tips for Staying Cool During Early-Season Hunts at the WON

Staying cool can be a challenge. I remember one summer my husband and I headed to the hunting blind for shade. About an hour later I looked over at a flushed-faced man. When I spoke, he looked distant and dizzy. He felt sick and his heart was pounding. It occurred to me, “He’s near heatstroke. Never mind a buck; I’m going to have to figure out how to pack out my husband.”

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Antelope for Dinner

LG Brings Home Antelope for Dinner

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Our LG brings home antelope for dinner, but there’s a story to go with the hunt. As new hunters grow into sportsmen, their interests in methods of take expand. The Little Gal (LG) has developed into quite the young hunter. This year she went beyond her traditional methods of hunting and got an amazing result. She took her bow and took her time to complete a beautiful first archery harvest.

Antelope-buck-pronghorn-photo-by-Lea-Leggitt

(Lea Leggitt photo)

History

LG has harvested multiple big-game animals with her rifle, but after competing in shooting sports, she wanted to expand her horizons. She shoots indoor competitive archery league, 3-D archery tournaments and Youth Hunter Education Challenge archery events. Through the YHEC program, there is a focus on hunting and hunting safety. She wanted to take her skills to the field.

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Mia & the Little Gal is sponsored by Girls with Guns Clothing.

Success Rates

In Colorado, the success rate for harvesting antelope during rifle season is relatively high, at 50 percent statewide. Archery season success is a bit lower, with a statewide annual harvest rate of 24 percent. That’s quite a challenge LG was setting for herself. … (CLICK HERE to read more)

 


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Antelope Jerky or Tag Soup

A buck and two doe antelope high tail it as they realize we are stalking them.
A buck and two doe antelope high tail it as they realize we are stalking them.

The first evening of my archery antelope hunt we immediately saw a buck and two does. We headed out and put a stalk on them. We never did get anywhere close enough to take a shot with a bow. However, we were excited to have been on the move after those speed goats.

We hunted the remainder of the evening and located another BIG buck! It was too close to dark to put a stalk. We decided we would come back in the morning to try to find HIM.

New and old lessons learned on a 2-1/2 day archery antelope hunt

  • Don’t rush the hunt.
  • Never say “never”, especially when someone says they shanked a shot.
  • It really is possible to get within archery range of a speed goat.
  • Even the dry prairie has amazing things to discover.

The next morning we stalked to within 150 yards of the big buck before he turned his head. There were about 20 does in the opposite direction and he sauntered off toward them. We needed to figure out a way to get close enough to HIM for a shot with my bow.

We set up the blind and I began my sit. I sat and I sat. Anyone who has hunted from a blind knows how tiresome it can become. This was not only tiresome, but a HOT 98 degree. I was scanning and glassing across the prairie when BAM! Two does! Right in front of my blind! They stood at a point I had ranged earlier at 20 yards.

They were dead to rights, right?!

Nope. My heart raced as I looked everywhere for HIM. My eyes scanned for the buck, and the two does casually walked out of sight. I sat there, staring at nothing and began wishing I had drawn on one of them.

“AAAH!” Haha! Hunting is too much fun!

I  moved my blind near a waterhole in hopes of an evening shot at HIM. Hank joined me and as we waited, we spotted a couple of coyotes. Next six deer jumped and splashed in the pond. We knew we were getting close to the end of our day when BAM! It was HIM! He was on his way, right in front of my blind.

I picked up my bow, drew and tracked him in my sight. He moved quickly, then paused for a moment and I touched the trigger. I was sure I had him. As my arrow left the string, it made a horrible sound. I wasn’t sure what it was. I saw HIM jump. He stopped and trotted about forty yards away then walked away, up the hill.

Confused, I asked “Did I hit him?!” Hank looked at him through his binos saying “I don’t see a single drop of blood. You didn’t even hit him.”

That is when we saw the most horrific thing. As I had moved from one window to another, the levels had changed and you know it…. I shot the blind. AAAAHHHH!!!!

I missed!!! A MONSTER! He was at 30 yards and I hit the side of the blind!!!!! GRRRR! (Never say never)

I made my way back to camp and figured I would have nightmares about my evening. The next day would be the last of the hunt for me. I worried that I would never see HIM again.

I woke up and hoped to be blessed with another chance. I set up and low and behold one was coming. It was HIM – again! He was about 100 yards away when I heard a sound just outside of the blind.

“WHAT?!” I thought. Could there be another antelope coming in from the side?

Suddenly a hornet zipped inside my blind. It flew wildly and smacked the sides of the blind. With my bow up and ready to draw, I tried to ignore the bluish black insect. I held steady waiting for HIM. Then the hornet flew at me. I ducked and dodged, and….. You know it… made movement and scared HIM away.

The buck takes a long slow drink to cool off during the heat of the day.
The buck takes a long slow drink to cool off during the heat of the day.

My heart sank as I watched, what I knew was going to be my last chance, walk away. He made his way to the other side of the pond, stuck his tongue out at me and took a drink.

That day it was 105 degrees outside of the blind. I stuck it out hoping for a doe before dark. We saw a bear, turkeys, five coyotes and no antelope.

Overall, I deem this first hunt a success, but we’ll be having tag soup instead of antelope jerky. It was an exhilarating experience. We got so close, and saw so many cool things. What are the chances of getting so close and having four opportunities and having a hornet befriend you in the blind?! It’s always an adventure!


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