Special Needs Horseback Rides Bring Smiles

Riders, volunteers, and even horses are smiling

In between teaching shotgun at the Women’s Outdoor Weekend and helping at the Youth Fishing Derby in Pagosa Springs Wolf Creek Outfitters (WCO) hosted the special needs children of Pagosa Springs for the annual horseback ride.

Each year our team gives the kids the opportunity to watch, pet, lead, and if they desire, ride a horse. This is a day the WCO team and our friends look forward to each year.

Twelve children along with their instructors and a couple of parents arrive for the big day. The morning begins with adjustments to boots and cowboy hats, followed by greetings and instructions. Then everyone meets the horses.

Many of the children have been to this event in the past and are comfortable around the horses. Others take a little warming up. Then before you know it they are off on a ride.

We start off with our team of volunteers leading the children via horseback on short rides around the arena. For those who are up to it, and capable, they’re handed the reins and get to be in the “driver’s seat.”

We also make it a point to try to get the instructors and volunteers a-horseback. After all, why should these children ride if the adults won’t? This year we had two of the group’s instructors or leaders, who’d never ridden before, take a ride.

This year we also have a new addition to this special day. Loud, “OOOHs, AAAHs, and WOW’s” were heard as Ombré the pony led out for his grand introduction.

Ombré proudly packed around a few of the smaller, more timid children. One of these only rode once, but had Ombré not been there she may have not ridden at all.

Each year it seems there’s at least one who doesn’t want to hop on a saddle. Don’t worry. We put them right to work. They get to smile, wave, and cheer in support of their friends. Some of the more brave ones learn to lead the horses too.

Another youngster, who is deaf, climbed atop Cowboy (aka., Mr. Man) and rode the entire time. Having been to this special event before, he wasn’t getting down from the horse until it’s time to go.

At WCO we are honored to be a part of such a great event. It’s rewarding to meet these great youngsters and to have them back year after year. The horses love them too. It’s amazing how they have a sense of who they’re packing around and know they need to take care of their riders.

We’re proud to have such a great team of horses that take care of this precious cargo and a fantastic group of volunteers who find it rewarding to give back to this special group of people.

We know they all find great reward in this day, but we’d also like to give a huge thanks to our volunteers, Terry Eschelman, Jordan Lindsay, Lea Leggitt, Laura Jacobson, and Tucker Jacobson.

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►FacebookPinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

Coping with the Stress of Losing an Animal

In my latest newsletter I discussed stress, coping with it, managing it, and learning from it. I mentioned that we all have stress in our lives, and … well, I may have inadvertently invited some into my life because it’s been a heck of a week.

Fist off, someone said, “You look like you just lost your dog.” Have you ever made that comment to someone? Because in fact, I did just lose one of my dogs. If you’ve never met me in person, or if you haven’t spent much time with me, you won’t know that I don’t have a poker face. When I “lost my dog” this Tuesday, the sentiment was shown from the core of my being.

Here at the Funny Farm we have lots of animals, and no matter how many I’ve had it’s never easy to lose one. I’m a hunter and because of it have been called cold, mean, heartless, and animal hater among other falsities. One thing I am is a person that loves animals.

Dear Sampson, Run like the wind big buddy! You are missed.

Let me start with a line up of the crew here. We have: 24 horses, mules, mustangs and a pony; three goats; seven geese; nine ducks; ten chickens; a turkey; an emu; and now we have six dogs.

Of our hunting hounds, who love to pursue all sizes of the feline persuasion we have Fat Tire (15-years-old), Reba (13-years-old), Freaky (13-years-old), and the late Sampson (7-years-old). Look at that, would you? “The late” Sampson is the youngster of the bunch. He’s the offspring of Fat Tire and Reba. He’s a gorgeous black and tan, and suffered from chronic ear infections.

We spent multiple years and a variety of treatments dealing with his ears. This winter he suffered a massive weight and energy loss. Again we visited the veterinarian for help. His blood work looked good. His ears — not too bad, for him. He received medication, vitamins and extra nutrition and never gained any weight but did display a bit of energy.

This spring I found a burst abscess behind his jaw. We took him in and the vet performed two surgeries in an attempt to find a foreign object, which was believed to have caused the infection. The surgeries were not successful as the infection continued to ooze from the site. I asked if it could be from his ears, but that fell on deaf ears (pun intended). Sampson was put on a different antibiotic, and then a more powerful one, and then “the most powerful” antibiotic. The infection persisted.

After two surgeries, additional vet appointments, tests, cultures, and scans we were directed to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital in Fort Collins (seven hours away). The office is one of the best in the state, and for our sweet hound who’s withering away, it gave us hope.

We loaded our boy up and made the trek. Family and friends asked, “Are you prepared for the worst?” to which we answered, “Yes.”

Sampson was in good spirits. He’s a kind loving hound. Always willing to go the extra mile. What we didn’t really understand is just how tough of a hound dog he is, and how severely the infection — FROM HIS EAR had gotten. As I had queried some months ago, the abscess was from the ear infection. The infection was great, and he’d already been on months of antibiotic treatment.

After attempts at scoping inside his ear, and after a CT scan, we learned that the infection was vast. They could perform surgery, but there’s no definite answer as to how they would prevent another infection. In the delicate area of nerves and brain tissue, it would be difficult to clean it all out.

We had to make the decision, which we thought we were prepared for but we’ve never had to make before.

As much as we want to keep our happy hound with us forever, we couldn’t allow him to continue to suffer. It’s been a tough few days, and we came home with an empty kennel and a new hollow space in our hearts.

When I mentioned stress above, I said, “first” and that’s because there is a second. Secondly, my MacBook Pro has taken a crash. It has to go in for a new hard drive. I’ll be back soon to share an update with you about my recent trip to Washington, D.C. with the DC Project. For now, I’m working to keep up with work, my commitments to volunteering, and I’m headed out to enjoy time with my family and deal with the stress.

10 IDEAS FOR COPING WITH THE STRESS OF LOSING AN ANIMAL

  • Know that they aren’t ours forever.
  • Love them while you have them so you don’t have regrets.
  • Do everything in your power to keep them healthy so you don’t question yourself later.
  • Hug your loved ones and accept their sympathies.
  • Let your other animals console you.
  • Take some time to reflect.
  • Don’t be afraid to cry your eyes out.
  • Honor them with a burial.
  • Remove their empty house if it calms the emptiness.
  • If need be, get another pet but know that no pet can ever replace the one you have. They’re never the same but fill the emptiness in a different way.

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►FacebookPinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

Touches of Springtime at the Funny Farm

It’s incredible how less than two weeks ago we had feet of snow and now it’s gone, and it looks like springtime at the Funny Farm. Does it feel like spring in your neck of the woods?

I’ll start by saying that we had our annual Safari Club International banquet fundraiser event last weekend. Most of my time and energy the past few weeks has gone into support, promotion, and creation of the event, and directly after if finished I began prepping for the next event — Easter! The first day of spring happened to coincide with the transition.

Springtime is always a happy season for most of my friends. At my house the decor changes, days get longer, temperatures get warmer, from the dead of winter the ponds thaw and grass grows, and baby animals are born! All of this makes me smile, so I thought I’d share a bit of country living with you.

I snuck outside with the camera to get a few pictures yesterday. Here’s a peek at things from animals to colorful additions on the first day of spring at the Funny Farm.

Sparing!
Scrappy Corgi – Just ranchin’.

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►FacebookPinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

Success, Relationships, Country Life, Goals

As we head into February it’s time to reflect, renew, and keep pushing toward our goals. Keep striving to become a better you.

“Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts.”

~Winston Churchill

2019 seems to have begun with a jolt. I’m excited about the momentum I have and I aim to keep it going. However, I have so many friends and family that have been struck with adversity. I hope they can keep going despite the challenges they face.

“Success is not final…” Even though things are rolling in a good direction for me, right now, I won’t call it success. I’m on the road to success and it’s possibly never ending. When I think about the meaning of success, I define it in various ways. It could be achieving a goal. It could be filling a tag. Maybe to some it’s about being rich or out doing someone else.

In my mind the last one on the list is a definition of failure. We should make it a goal to help others, not outdo them. Of course, there are competitions, but in relationships it’s only an achievement if it’s a Win-Win.

If someone doesn’t want to have a 4,000 square-foot mansion, then that shouldn’t be required. If they want to have a pasture of horses, let them. If they don’t want livestock but instead want to grow crops, so be it. We live in a day and age where so many people try to define you by their expectations — Totally discounting what yours may be.

Do you ever wonder how far this tangled endeavor of rules and boundaries and definitions may go? I sure do. We’ll see what covenants happen this year in our beautiful little ranch/farming community. We just might be told how many and what color animals we’re allowed to let roam in our front pasture. Think I’m joking? I’m not.

Why don’t these people care about your or my opinion? Because they don’t know us. They’re not connected to us. They only care about themselves. They’ll approach a conversation with their story, their perspective, their feelings.

How do “Me” and “I” help in your relationships? They don’t, yet that’s how many people approach others nowadays. For the month of
February I challenge you to pay attention to how many times you add your story into a conversation, discounting that of whomever you’re speaking with. — Test it out. Give it a try. Let me know how it goes.

Try the challenge in the virtual and the real world. Remember, last month I challenged you to engage in conversations with the people you come across in person. I hope that’s been going well. While technology may build some sort of report, we need to nurture the relationships that are right before us — in real life.

“Treasure your relationships, not your possessions.”

Anthony J. D’Angelo

8 Ways to Improve Your Relationships

  1. Listen – How many times have you attempted to engage in a conversation only to see that your counterpart’s eyes are glazed over? Have you ever spoken about an experience, challenge, or idea only to have the other person(s) cut you off to tell you their thoughts or stories? Conversations aren’t always about you. Learn to listen.
  2. Be Curious – Do you know it all? My bet is that you don’t. If you’re a good listener your curiosity should become aroused. Start asking questions and be interested in others. You’d be surprised what you could learn about them. Your interest in other people makes them feel better. Your listening and questioning will save you money since you’ll know the gifts that they actually want.
  3. Communicate – Listening and asking questions is a start to good communication. As you practice these skills, you need to learn when it’s appropriate to interject your ideas and opinions. Check your emotions and learn what works best; Communications strategies will vary with each individual. The challenge is being diverse in each conversation.
  4. Be Respectful – The number one relationship mistake I witness people making is neglecting qualities one, two and three (listed above), followed by digging in their heals and fighting to be right. Children are to respect adults and adults need to reciprocate. We are all entitled to our opinions and shouldn’t decide to cut others off if they don’t see things the way we do. Respect the views of others.
  5. Remember Your Manners – One of the best places to visit with family, friends, and colleagues is around the table. There are books you can buy if you didn’t have a mentor to teach you good etiquette (try THIS FOR LADIES or THIS FOR GENTLEMEN). Manners are imperative is at the table, and it’s a great place to enjoy good fellowship; Don’t ruin it. If you’re shoveling food into your mouth, talking with a mouth full of food, or other forgetting to clasp your hands and bow your head in prayer (whether you believe in God or not), others may likely wish you weren’t there and fear to engage in conversation because they don’t know what other atrocious actions you’ll display. NEVER stuff your napkin in someone’s face whether in jest or not. — NEVER!
  6. Be Present – This point refers back to number one, above. If you are present, you’ll know what is happening, what protocol the host is calling for, or what you’re guests may need. Put down your device, come back from day-dream land and work on the steps listed above.
  7. Value – Count your blessings and value the people you have in your life. If you forget to follow tips one thru six, you just may not have them around.
  8. Be a Gift – Be someone who is remembered with a smile, not just after life but here and now. This year, I challenge you to learn how you can be a blessing to others — Not in the ways you think are great, but in ways that they will love too.

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►Facebook  ►+GooglePinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

7 Ways to Improve Your Relationships in the New Year

Out here on the Funny Farm we’ve been planning for the new year for about a year. We’ve been setting, expanding, and working on goals every month. Our schedules run so far ahead that it’s not as though suddenly 2019 strikes us as a surprise. In our busy lives, we have to remember that relationships are important for all of our goals or resolutions.

In this age of technology, I’m happy to live a country way of life that my parents, aunts, uncles and godparents and friends taught me. I feel blessed that you’re following me and I can share a bit of it with you. Technology has brought people together in a roundabout way, yet in another, it has torn people apart. We spend time locked in on our devices, checking and rechecking, and scrolling and tapping on family’s, friend’s, and stranger’s posts. Let’s remember that country way of living by sharing our lives with others.

While technology may build some sort of report, what are we doing in the relationships that are right before us — in real life? How are things with your family, friends, and colleagues? How can you improve those relationships?

8 Things to Improve Your Relationships

  1. Listen – How many times have you attempted to engage in a conversation only to see that your counterpart’s eyes are glazed over? Have you ever spoken about an experience, challenge, or idea only to have the other person(s) cut you off to tell you their thoughts or stories? Conversations aren’t always about you. Learn to listen.
  2. Be Curious – Do you know it all? My bet is that you don’t. If you’re a good listener your curiosity should become aroused. Start asking questions and be interested in others. You’d be surprised what you could learn about them. Your interest in other people makes them feel better. Your listening and questioning will save you money since you’ll know the gifts that they actually want.
  3. Communicate – Listening and asking questions is a start to good communication. As you practice these skills, you need to learn when it’s appropriate to interject your ideas and opinions. Check your emotions and learn what works best; Communications strategies will vary with each individual. The challenge is being diverse in each conversation.
  4. Be Respectful – The number one relationship mistake I witness people making is neglecting qualities one, two and three (listed above), followed by digging in their heals and fighting to be right. Children are to respect adults and adults need to reciprocate. We are all entitled to our opinions and shouldn’t decide to cut others off if they don’t see things the way we do. Respect the views of others.
  5. Remember Your Manners – One of the best places to visit with family, friends, and colleagues is around the table. There are books you can buy if you didn’t have a mentor to teach you good etiquette (try THIS FOR LADIES or THIS FOR GENTLEMEN). Manners are imperative is at the table, and it’s a great place to enjoy good fellowship; Don’t ruin it. If you’re shoveling food into your mouth, talking with a mouth full of food, or other forgetting to clasp your hands and bow your head in prayer (whether you believe in God or not), others may likely wish you weren’t there and fear to engage in conversation because they don’t know what other atrocious actions you’ll display. NEVER stuff your napkin in someone’s face whether in jest or not. — NEVER!
  6. Be Present – This point refers back to number one, above. If you are present, you’ll know what is happening, what protocol the host is calling for, or what you’re guests may need. Put down your device, come back from day-dream land and work on the steps listed above.
  7. Value – Count your blessings and value the people you have in your life. If you forget to follow tips one thru six, you just may not have them around.
  8. Be a Gift – Be someone who is remembered with a smile, not just after life but here and now. This year, I challenge you to learn how you can be a blessing to others — Not in the ways you think are great, but in ways that they will love too.

Cheers, friends. Thank you for taking the time to stop by. I wish you many blessings in each day and in the coming year. HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►Facebook  ►+GooglePinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

Deer Dancer — Read it with Me

I have many friends who still read a good book but many more who won’t even take the time to read a little blog post such as this. I’ve always had an affinity toward a good book and remember a time when friends thought I was snobbish because I had my nose down in a book as my parents drove me through the little town of Pagosa Springs.

Over the years I’ve learned to wave and say, “Hi” to those I know, and even to those I don’t. It’s the way of living in a small town — even if it’s grown and now I don’t know as my people as I did back then. I also still have a love for a good book and a dream of a gorgeous library.

Are you a reader? What book(s) are you reading?

During those childhood days I learned a lot from my parents, God-parents, relatives, and family friends. Something I’d been told of is my ancestry. Have you ever looked at a picture of me and wondered what nationality I am?

I’ve met people who are afraid to ask, because in this day and age you must worry about offending someone. I’ve met those who are curious and dance around the subject and those who come straight forth with the inquiry. “What is your nationality?”

The answer as to what my background is can be a long answer, but I usually reply, “I’m a Heinze 57.” Other times the response is, “I’m a mutt.” You know what a mutt is, right? Mutts like me are made up of who knows what and how much.

Dad and mom told me the story of their ancestors. I’m not sure which are true and which are “fake news.” I will tell you, some of it has been verified and some has not. Let me leave that to you to guess as I relay the information. — No, I’ve not sent my DNA to strangers for testing.

Mom has told me that we are German, Irish, Dutch, and Welsh. Dad and several relatives relayed that his side of the family is Mexican, Yaqui, French, and Swedish. Now, if that doesn’t make me a mutt, I don’t know what to tell you, other than a saying my dad used quite often, “It is what it is.”

Back to reading books. The book I’m reading now is one I think you may like so I have to share it with you, regardless of your background. It caught my eye not only because it’s about the Yaqui people but because of the title, ‘Deer Dancer.’

I live near multiple Native American tribes and learned a lot about their respect for land and wildlife over the years. It’s part of where I get my values. I’ve always found it interesting to see the different traditions and ceremonies the tribes have, but I’d never learned about the Yaqui so I figured it’s worth a read. 

Why don’t you read it with me? If you respect wildlife, nature, Christianity, and maybe embrace the hunt, you might like it. I see ceremonial dress including a deer head, hooves, and cocoon husks in the cover artwork. It is intriguing to me. HERE IS A LINK to ‘Deer Dancer — Yaqui Legends of Life’ by Stan Padilla. Let me know what you think.

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►Facebook  ►+GooglePinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links. 

National Day of the Horse — That Makes Me Look Good

I just learned that it’s National Horse Day so I have to share a story about that beautiful steed and a day when he made me look good. — Not that he’s only made me look good once, but I’m only sharing the one story. Can you imagine the stories he has to tell?

Of course, I’ll begin with “we were on an elk hunt” rather than, “once upon a time” because — well, you know.

We were on an elk hunt in New Mexico and my friend Eddie and I were guiding one hunter as Hank guided another. Both Eddie’s and my horse are named Cowboy, but his boy is black and mine is a red dun. We’d had many close encounters with elk that day but never got in position for a good shot on a good elk.

We received a message from Hank. His hunter had shot an elk so we’d need to head his direction as I had the pack horses. With the sun on its downward decent we mounted up and headed his way. When we got to his location we found that he already had the elk field dressed and ready to be loaded up. 

Eddie and I ground tied our Cowboys and led the pack horses to the meat. If you aren’t familiar with the term, “ground tie,” that means we dropped our reins on the ground; the horses were not tied to anything. It’s a term adopted by those who have good horses that don’t run off. You simply drop the reins and the horse will wait as though he’s tied.

Darkness overtook the valley and we hoisted the meat into the paniers and lashed the head and antlers atop one of the loads. We helped the hunters onto their horses and from atop his horse Hank held the lead rope of the pack string.

“Alright. We’re ready to go.” Eddie said as he and I looked blankly at one another. We shined our headlamps in the direction that we’d ground tied them — The Cowboys were nowhere to be seen. Of course, you can imagine a bad word or two came from Eddie’s mouth, “Well, what are we going to do now?”  

I giggled. We’d been bragging all day about whose Cowboy is better. “HAH!” I blurted out. “My Cowboy is a phenomenal horse, Eddie. He’ll be right here, and I’ll go get your rotten horse.” I whistled.

Then I waited.

A mighty fine red dun horse emerged from the darkness and “Holy $h..!” came from my friend’s mouth. I jumped on my horse and rode up the valley a few hundred yards to retrieve the black Cowboy, then handed his rein to my friend who stood there in awe.

We rode out in the darkness, and I quietly patted the neck of my horse, thanking him for making me look good that night. Heck! He made himself look good too! A day or two later I fessed up to Eddie. Although he’s usually pretty easy for me to catch, that’s the first time my Cowboy acted like the horse of the Lone Ranger and appeared at the sound of my whistle. 

Is there a lesson to be learned here? Of course!

Have faith that someone, or something, will do its job and make you look good.

Micromanagement isn’t always required.

If you trust in someone or something, they’ll trust in you too.

Mia Anstine

Connect with Mia – ►Twitter  ►Facebook  ►+GooglePinterestYouTubeInstagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Tuesday Ponderings – Family Time and the Christmas Season

It is the season of Christmas and I sit here awaiting the sunrise and time for feeding the animals on the Funny Farm. I sip my coffee planning the coming days and weeks, and puzzle over families separated and acting childish because their egos are too big and the expectations too high.

As I sit here and ponder the separations in our communities I come to remember being able to ask dad for his insight or grandpa about the logic of it all. Yet they are gone, and I’m left here to be the one to contemplate.

Since at least three years of age, I can remember experiencing the loss of a family member. Believe it or not, I recall attending my great-grandfather’s funeral. I also remember looking up to him before that and admiring his horn-rimmed glasses and his eyes that glimmered behind them. I also remember his plants and his garden and his satisfaction in raising fresh fruits and the like.

I remember my great-grandmother who experienced the loss of my grandmother and my great-uncle (her children) before her time came to go. I know her heart ached, and mine did too — and when she left it ached again.

My god-mother and god-father, great uncles, cousins, — and my brother, my grandpa, and my dad — they’ve all left this place we know. I remember all of them as being giving, caring, hard workers, who feared the Lord and embraced their family. What I’ve seen after is a lot of selfishness, ego, and expectations that overpower the great goodness of having a loving family. I see families torn apart, shunning one another, complaining about one another.

Do they not know how blessed they are to have one another, if even for a short time?

During this holiday season, and every day, remember to check your ego; check your expectations and embrace who you have for the time they are here. Before you know it things will change and you’ll never be able to get that time back.

Will your memories be of digging in your heals to prove that someone in your life is wrong — because you think you’re right? — Or is that how others will remember you?

1 Thessalonians 5:15 Make sure that no one repays evil for evil. Always pursue what is good for one another and for all people.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

MAC WordPress Feature

Stop With the Excuses by Save the Cowboy

I came across this image and message of “stop with the excuses” a while ago. I found it inspiring because don’t we all come up with reasons, blame, justifications, and ways to whitewash an outcome? As we head into the week, read the piece from ‘Save the Cowboy’ and think about what ways you’re inhibiting your progress in life. Let’s do our best to keep going but quit those nasty excuses.

mm

“You’ve reached your limit when you reach for excuses. – Save the Cowboy

So what excuses do we make?

  1. I’m afraid – Afraid of what they may say. Afraid of what might happen. Afraid that it won’t happen. Have courage, stand up, ride the horse, ask the girl, go anyway.
  2. I’m broken – Yes, we all are to some extent. But being broken and remaining broken are two different things. If you want to become unbroken, don’t make the next excuse.
  3. I can’t… – You’re right, you can’t. Of course, you’d also be right if you said you can.
  4. I don’t know how – Then make mistakes. Find someone that does know how. Do something besides whine.
  5. But I’m too… – You’re too what? Shy? Old? Young? Skinny? Fat? Whatever word you use is a lie.
  6. Someday I will… – No, you won’t. The passage of time changes nothing except the date on the calendar. Do something today that will be a step towards who you want to be in the future.
  7. But they… – No one is to blame but you. Take responsibility. Take action. Take control.

I’m sure some of these hit home, but just in case — what’s your excuse? Because remember, “A valid reason doesn’t mean it’s a good excuse.” www.savethecowboy.com Background photo by Brandee Gillham.”


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.