Quick and Easy Rifle Scope Sight-In

Sighting in your rifle scope really should be quick and easy. Aside from a windy day, or a loose or defective scope, the only thing that would cause a poor shot grouping this the shooter. Let’s eliminate some of those factors and get sighted in.

After your rifle scope has been properly mounted and bore sighted, you have to fire some rounds down range and zero the scope on a target. Don’t rely on a bore-sight.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

The other day a friend came over to sight in his new rifle and scope. I happened to have been busy with work, and since sighting in really takes no time at all, I figured I’d not pack up work but let him get things dialed in.

After a few hours and numerous boxes of ammunition, the shots still were not in a tight group on the target.

Womens-hunting-rifle-Christiansen-Arms-270WSM-Swarovski-optics-Mia-Anstine-photo

Let me share a quick way to get your crosshairs on target that requires minimal shots fired.

As I mentioned, you need to have a rifle with the scope properly mounted. If you don’t know how to do this, take it to the shop and leave it to the pros. After that, you’re ready to head to the range.

I mentioned wind and faulty equipment. If it’s a gusty, windy day, skip the sighting in until the winds are calm. You’ve already had a pro mount the scope, and we’ll take it from the factory that the scope is in good working order. Next, we need to eliminate another factor and that’s the shooter. Mount the gun into a shooting rest that is sitting solidly on a stable shooting bench. This will eliminate most the the errors caused by the shooter.

Bring the ammunition that you intend to hunt or compete with. One box of ammunition should suffice.

Mount paper sight in targets down range. I suggest zeroing your hunting rifle at 200 yards. This distance can be adjusted according to your preference.  The Shoot and See type of targets with the grid and bullseye work well. Bring your binoculars and/or spotting scope so that you can see from the shooting bench where the shots are hitting on the target. A friend isn’t required for this project but does come in handy.

*Always follow safety rules when handling firearms.

Place your rifle securely in the shooting rest and load one cartridge into the chamber. Place the crosshairs directly on the center of the bullseye and fire one shot. Use the binocular or spotting scope to check the location of impact on the target. If the impact is 3 inches high and 5 inches right, make note of it. Then repeat the shot, for accuracy purposes, to find a shot grouping. Again, place the rifle securely in the rest, put your crosshairs on the bullseye and fire one round.

If the second shot is in the same area of the target as the first, you’re ready for scope adjustment. If not, continue the process of securing the rifle in the rest, aiming at the bullseye, and shooting. Make sure you have a good shot group before you begin adjusting the scope.

Do not compensate by moving your crosshairs on the target. This is called chasing your shot and will not help you to get a good shot group. If you cannot determine a shot group, clear your gun and head back to the shop to double-check your scope.

Once you have a shot grouping, remove the adjustment covers on the scope. With the rifle still secured in the shooting rest, look through the scope and place the crosshairs on the holes you’ve shot in the target

This is where a friend comes in handy. As you peer through the scope, at the holes in the target, have your friend move the windage and elevations of adjustments, down and left, until your crosshairs come back to the bullseye. Do not move the rifle during this process.

Now your scope’s crosshairs are on the bullseye. Make sure your range is still safe and fire two more shots, to double-check the accuracy. You should be dialed in and good to go for the hunt. If all goes well, you’re looking at four shots fired. You may need to fire additional rounds for fine-tuning, and you’ll definitely want to practice shooting positions after the scope has been zeroed from the steady shooting rest.

Remember, you always need to double-check the accuracy of your rifle after you’ve traveled with it, even if you’ve had it securely stowed in a hard case.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Biggest Month in Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program History

I enjoy volunteering time to teach gun and hunting safety. I’ve written and spoken about the NRA’s Eddie Eagle GunSafe program many times. That’s why I’m excited to share this great news with you!

July 2018 Marks Biggest Month in Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program History

MAC WordPress Feature (7)FAIRFAX, Va. – The NRA Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program reached another milestone in its 30th anniversary year, as the program fulfilled more requests for Eddie Eagle program materials in the month of July 2018 than any other month in program history.

The NRA provided more than 250,000 Eddie Eagle student workbooks throughout July primarily to law enforcement agencies throughout the nation, many of whom will use the materials to teach firearm accident prevention during community events, such as the National Night Out ™ this summer.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

In the program’s three decades of outreach, more than 30 million children across the United States have learned NRA’s simple, effective firearm accident prevention principles. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, unintentional firearm fatalities among children of the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program’s targeted age group have declined almost 80 percent since the program’s debut.

Created in 1988 by NRA Past President Marion P. Hammer, the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program is a gun accident prevention program developed by a task force made up of educators, school administrators, curriculum specialists, urban housing safety officials, clinical psychologists, law enforcement officials and National Rifle Association firearm safety experts. The program was founded with one mission: to teach children four simple, easy to remember steps so they know what to do if they ever come across a gun — STOP! Don’t Touch. Run Away. Tell a Grownup.

Impacting approximately a million children a year, the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program has been utilized by more than 28,000 schools, law enforcement agencies, and civic groups. The governors of 26 states have signed resolutions recommending that the program be used in their school systems and the legislatures of 25 states passed resolutions recommending the use of the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program.

Funds raised through Friends of NRA and distributed through The NRA Foundation enable schools and police departments to teach the program at minimal or no cost. The NRA encourages citizens nationwide to participate in heightening gun accident prevention awareness within their local communities. School administrators and faculty, law enforcement agencies, civic groups, and others interested in more information about the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program should contact the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program by email at eddie@nrahq.org or call (800) 231-0752. Parents can visit http://www.eddieeagle.com to begin learning today!

About the National Rifle Association

Established in 1871, the National Rifle Association is America’s oldest civil rights and sportsmen’s group. Nearly six million members strong, NRA continues its mission to uphold Second Amendment rights and is the leader in firearm education and training for law-abiding gun owners, law enforcement and the military. Visit http://www.nra.org.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

 

Reducing Recoil with Muzzle Brakes

As we get closer to hunting season this week’s tip to get your shots on target in about muzzle brakes. When we plan to hunt with a rifle we need to do our best to make sure we have good shot groupings.

I’ve shared ways to attain a tighter shot grouping and a few ways to reduce shooting flinch. After that, I received a message from a friend telling me that adding a muzzle brake to the rifle is a way to reduce flinch. While the brake reduces recoil, it doesn’t necessarily reduce shooting flinch.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

I have a muzzle brake on the end of the barrel of my 6.5-300 Weatherby, my daught3er has one on her .270 WSM, and H has one on his .338-378 Weatherby. Are you noticing a pattern with these three guns? They are ones that shoot very hot rounds. That means the cartridge is loaded with a lot of gunpowder and when it’s ignited, it produces a mass of gasses that go “bang” and push the bullet out of the barrel.  Many of the rifles that shoot “hot” loads will have muzzle brakes on the end because without one the recoil would be tremendous.

Muzzle brakes are ported devices that attach to the end of the barrel and are designed to reduce recoil. They are not suppressors. The brake has ports that angle so as to push the gasses, which push the bullet out of the barrel, back. The shooter and bystanders will feel the effects/wind from the shot.

( + ) Reduced Recoil

The redirecting of the gasses causes the felt effect of recoil to be spread out instead of pushing the rifle directly back into the shoulder. Most muzzle brakes reduce recoil by about 50%.

This is something that indeed may reduce shooting flinch for someone, but let’s talk about some of the other plusses and minuses before we come to a verdict.

MAC WordPress Feature (6)

( – ) Noise

You and any bystanders need to wear your eyes and ears when you’re shooting a rifle with a muzzle brake on the end of the barrel. Instead of being blown downrange the sound is being blown back to you. Along with this, dust and debris may be propelled in your direction Be safe and wear your proper protective equipment.

( +/- ) Accurate

The muzzle brake won’t decrease the velocity or accuracy of the projectile. However, you’ll need a gunsmith to install it and then you’ll need to sight it in. If you remove it you’ll need to sight in your rifle again.

( – ) Adds Barrel Length

The brake adds to the length of the barrel. I personally have no issue with the added length, however, some people do. If overall length is an issue, you may order your rifle with a shorter barrel prior to adding the brake.

( – ) Debris

A ported device that adds length to the barrel makes me think about knocking tree branches as I’m hiking, which leads me to the issue of debris. With a muzzle brake, you need to be aware that the ports will increase your chances of collecting debris in the barrel. The ports can snag pine needles and other items as your hiking. The good news is it’s easy to remedy this issue. Either rubberband a plastic bag over the brake, or cut the fingertip off of a latex glove and roll it over the brake at the barrel’s end. These are easy to remove and in a pinch, you can even shoot through them.

A muzzle brake is something you can look at to reduce recoil. It makes those larger calibers and hotter loads more “shootable.” However, due to that increased noise and the blow-back of air, it can actually increase shooting flinch. Overcome that with practice at the range.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Hunting Prep – Reduce Shooting Flinch

If you’ve been to the range to prep for hunting season and have noticed that your shot groups aren’t consistent, it may be due to the developed bad habit of Shooting Flinch.

While sighting in with a friend I noticed that she’d developed a flinch. She was anticipating the recoil while shooting her rifle, which significantly reduced her accuracy on target.

If you’re having a similar problem, there are a couple of techniques you can try to help reduce flinch. We need to get a tight shot group on the target.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

Shooters feel the recoil as it punches the butt of the rifle into the shoulder. It’s most recognizable when we shoot from a bench or prone shooting position. If it isn’t addressed, it can lead to bad habits which carry on into the field and can ruin a hunt.

In addition to the flinch, some habits a shooter can develop are closing their eyes, pulling or jerking the trigger, or sitting back or pulling away just as they pull the trigger. These bad habits will cause their shots to rarely hit the zone where they are aiming.

 

Mia-Anstine-shooting-6.5-300-Weatherby-Swarovski-x5i-optics

Start by shooting from a bench or lead sled to make sure the optics are zeroed. After that, you need to transition to a shooter held rifle position.

One thing you can do is to add a shoulder pad, puffy jacket or vest. Another thing a shooter can do is purchase a butt pad for their rifle. It will absorb a great amount of the recoil between the gun stock and the shooter’s shoulder. Something you’ll need to consider is that this will change the length of pull for the shooter, so test out the trigger finger’s reach before you go to live fire. This should be done before the hunt anyhow as we may be wearing different gear depending on the weather conditions.

With the added padding between the rifle and shoulder, the anticipation of recoil induced pain may be reduced.

With the expectation of recoil out of the way, you may notice other issues. Such as the bad habit of closing the eyes or the reflex of sitting back from the gun as the trigger’s pulled.

You can work on relaxing during the shot as well as some of the following:

  • Breathing techniques – Take a deep breath, slowly exhale then hold it for a pause as you pull the trigger.
  • Shoot at larger targets – Instead of aiming for a point on a bulls-eye shoot large paper animal-shaped targets. Aim for the kill-zone instead of a dot.
  • Trigger control – Worked on slowly taking up the slack on the trigger to prevent pulling or jerking her shots. Learn to pull the trigger slow and steady. As you pull the trigger look to see the point where the bullet hits the target. You should be surprised at the shot as it breaks.
  • Shoot from various positions – Shoot from the shooting bench and transition to sitting, kneeling, standing and from shooting sticks. This will provide a new focus that is not that of the anticipation of the shot.
  • Create shooting scenarios – Have a partner talk you through the following, “The elk just walked out. He’s broad-side. He’s clear. Take the shot when you’re ready.” Then add a reload into the scenario. Remind your partner, “You’re going to shoot once. Quickly throw the bolt and reload. The elk didn’t fall down. Quickly re-acquire your target and shoot again.” Rehearsing this scenario not only helps for real-life hunting situations, but it takes the shooter’s mind off the recoil.

With some practice the added confidence of shots that are grouped better we can reduce shooting flinch. Another thing to note is to shoot a very minimal number of rounds so the shooter doesn’t become tired or sore. If you’re preparing with your hunting rifle, six rounds may be plenty. Don’t let the shooter leave the range with a sore shoulder. You’ll be happy to work on better groupings instead of evading the dreaded bad habits.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Tighter Shot Grouping – Range Time

Spending all day teaching at the women’s shooting day I remembered that I need to remind you how to attain smaller shot groups with your rifle.

The occasion at which I helped instruct is one designed for ladies who are new to shooting, or at least new to the event. If a lady is a past attendee, she needs to bring a new enrollee in order to sign up again.

CLICK HERE to listen to this tip and more
in my segment at Armed Lutheran Radio.

At the women’s shooting day they divide into small groups and get to learn to shoot archery, .22 rifle and handgun, muzzleloader, shotgun, and higher caliber rifles. Each year I jump in to teach where I’m needed. This year I landed at the high-caliber rifle range.

When referring to “higher caliber” rifles I’m talking something larger than a .22, meaning .223 and 5.56. Don’t be alarmed if you think those are small because later I’ll tell you about the grand finale at the rifle tent.

Under the shade of the rifle tent the ladies start out with a safety briefing, an explanation of how to properly shoot a rifle, and then we dive into the operations of an AR style rifle. After questions are answered we divide the small group in half.

This year one half came to my shooting bench where I demonstrated a proper seated position, how to hold the rifle, and how to use a peep sight.

For tighter shot groupings use a proper shooting position.

As the ladies approached the bench for their turn behind the trigger we worked on getting them into a comfortable shooting position, which involved lengthening or shortening the adjustable stock for some. Next, they learned how to check if the safety’s on, view the chamber to see if it’s clear, load the ammunition into the magazine, insert it, and then chamber a round.

Since we had a peep sight on the rifle the ladies were shooting at my bench, it really required a good shooting technique to keep the sight steady on target as they pulled the trigger. Proper shooting position is imperative, but we also reminded the ladies of the B-R-A-S-S technique (listed below).

For tighter shot groupings use B-R-A-S-S.

  • B – Breath – Take slow smooth breaths.
  • R – Release – After you’ve taken a nice slow breath, let it out about halfway.
  • A – Aim – As you let that breath out, make sure you aim and your sights are on target.
  • S – Slack – With your sight on target place your finger on the trigger and slowly pull up the slack.
  • S – Shoot – With a slow, steady trigger pull the breaking of the trigger and firing of the shot should be a surprise.

The ladies who came to my bench first really had an advantage because at the other bench they shot a similar AR style rifle, but it had a red dot optic on it.

For tighter shot groupings use a red-dot optic.

With the red dot, they didn’t have to worry about looking through a tiny hole (peep) at a post and aligning it on the center of the target. They only had to align the red dot and practice the B-R-A-S-S technique as they fired their shots.

One thing to consider if you’re going to use an electronic optic, such as the red-dot, is that you’ll need to remember to turn it off and on. If the battery dies, you’re out of luck.

I mentioned a grand finale at the rifle tent and I did mean grand. After the ladies learned safety, shooting positions, and techniques they got to shoot a .50 BMG with a long-range tactical scope attached.

practicing-shooting-techniques-MAC-Outdoors

 

For tighter shot groupings use a scope.

Before teaching the ladies how to shoot the gun that’s about as long as I am tall we explained how it worked and I again demonstrated how to hold the gun and showed them proper shooting position. Behind this big gun, shooting position matters — A LOT. I also showed how to use your off-hand (not the trigger hand) to raise and lower the stock end of the rifle to get the target in your sights.

Once the ladies were properly seated behind the large rifle they learned how to align the crosshairs on the target. They again practiced the B-R-A-S-S technique as they fired a single shot.

If you too utilize and practice the above-mentioned accessories and techniques, you’ll have better shot-groupings on your targets.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.


techniques-for-tighter-shot-grouping-MAC-Outdoors

Attendee Opportunity to Shoot Like A Girl at NRA-AM

I’ve mentioned Shoot Like A Girl many times before as an opportunity for ladies to get the feel of firearms and archery equipment at a virtual range. This year the SLG trailer will be inside the exhibit hall at the National Rifle Association’s Annual Meetings in Dallas, Texas. If you’re going to be there, stop by. Ladies, go inside and give the system a try. Men, you can by Shoot Like a Girl gear outside the trailer.

Shoot Like A Girl Mobile Range Onsite at NRA Annual Meeting in Dallas, TX

For the First Time Shoot Like A Girl Inside the Exhibit Hall at NRA Annual Meeting

Screen Shot 2018-04-18 at 8.24.30 AMAthens, AL – April 30, 2018 – Shoot Like A Girl will be at booth 12358 inside the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center in Dallas, TX for the NRA Annual Meeting May 4th – 6th, 2018. This is their 5th year of bringing Shoot Like A Girl’s, state-of-the-art, semi-trailer mobile range to the NRA Annual Meeting, but the first time it will be inside.

This new location will expand the opportunity for the company to interact with like-minded ladies, passionately advocate for law-abiding citizens, and promote the importance of introducing women to shooting sports. Since the company’s inception, over 17,000 women have shot with Shoot Like A Girl leading to an overall economic impact to the shooting sports industry of more than 73 million dollars.

Shoot Like A Girl offers women in attendance at the NRA Annual meeting the opportunity to participate in a revolutionary introduction process, called the Test Shots™ and Test Flights™. In this process, they shoot a pistol, AR platform rifle, and compound bows in a safe controlled environment in a short amount of time guided by NRA Certified Instructors and archery coaches. The trailer features a military grade firearms simulation system and a live archery range. Shoot Like A Girl also features a gun counter, where all of the participants at NRAAM can review and compare a wide variety of firearms. There are many models on display from the corporate partners including revolvers, semi-automatic pistols, and rifles provide women the ability to explore available options.

The meeting attendees will be able to purchase Shoot Like A Girl logo wear and licensed products at booth 12358.

Special Note For Media:

Media is invited to Shoot Like A Girl’s mobile range during the NRA Annual meeting for live or filmed interviews. Come see and capture the excitement of the fastest growing demographic in the industry! Please make media appointments with Jeanine Sayre at jeanine.sayre@shootlikeagirl.com or 256-206-2460.

About Shoot Like A Girl:

Shoot Like A Girl is the industry leader in growing the number of women in shooting sports by empowering them with confidence with the support of their corporate partners: Cabela’s, Ruger, Smith & Wesson, Beretta, Tikka, Charter Arms, Colt, GLOCK, Magpul, Savage, Peltor Sport, Truglo, Alps Outdoorz, Lyman, Trijicon, Thermacell, Mossy Oak, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Beman, Federal Premium Ammunition, Hoppes, Elite Archery and Scott Archery, Mathews, Hoyt, Neet Archery Products, S & S Outdoors, Loyal Dog Food,and Upper Canyon Outfitters.

To learn more about SLG2, visit Shoot Like A Girl online, or visit on Facebook and Twitter.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Iconic Lady Athlete Rhode Defends World Cup Title

If you’re new to following, you should know I’m a fan of all things hunting, as well as shooting. One of my favorite iconic figures in shooting sport of Olympic shotgunner Kim Rhode.

She’s a phenomenon in shotgun sports, a fabulous hunter, and a role model to all. Check it out, as she continues to claim the podium.

Rhode Defends Title, Vizzi Wins Bronze and Connor Fourth at World Cup Final

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (October 25, 2017) – It was a strong showing from all three of the American competitors in Women’s Skeet as the U.S. took gold, bronze and fourth today at the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) World Cup Final in New Delhi, India.

Kim Rhode (El Monte, California) successfully defended her World Cup Final title in world-class fashion, equaling the world record of 56/60 targets in the Final. Current Olympic Champion, Diana Bacosi of Italy, would also tie Rhode’s score on her last target of the match. The gold medal was decided 22 targets later in a shootoff, with Rhode claiming her second World Cup Final title in a row. Today’s win marks Rhode’s third World Cup Final title in her career.

“A lot of things happened during this Final, but I think that’s typical with any event,” Rhode told the ISSF. “You just roll with the punches and hope for the best outcome… And this is the best outcome you can have! I couldn’t be happier!”

Reigning World Champion Dania Vizzi (Odessa, Florida) hit 44/50 targets to claim the bronze medal.

Caitlin Connor (Winnfield, Louisiana) missed two targets at a crucial stage in the competition to be eliminated in fourth place. Connor also finished fourth in her other World Cup Finals appearances in 2012 and 2009.

Competition continues for the USA Shooting Team at the World Cup Final as Women’s Air Rifle and Men’s Skeet action start tomorrow. Olympic champion Ginny Thrasher (Springfield, Virginia) will look to build on her 2016 World Cup Finals appearance where she won bronze in the Women’s Air Rifle event. Two-time Olympian Frank Thompson (Alliance, Nebraska) will represent the U.S. in Men’s Skeet. Thompson won silver at the World Cup stage in Acapulco, Mexico.

The Trap Mixed Team of Ashley Carroll (Solvang, California) and Derek Haldeman (U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit/Sunbury, Ohio) won bronze yesterday at the World Cup Final in India. Read that recap: http://www.usashooting.org/news/2017/10/24/994-carroll-and-haldeman-win-bronze-at-world-cup-final——.

Read the World Cup Final Preview: http://www.usashooting.org/news/2017/10/20/993-ten-athletes-head-to-world-cup-final-in-india.

All Finals will be streamed live on the ISSF website, on the Federation’s Livestream channel, on its page and on the Olympic Channel.

ISSF World Cup Final: Finals Schedule

All times are listed in Eastern Time. New Delhi is 10.5 hours ahead of the Eastern Time Zone

Thursday, October 26th: 10m Air Rifle Women at 2:30 a.m., Skeet Men at 5:30 a.m.

Saturday, October 28th:  Trap Women at 5:00 a.m.

Sunday, October 29th: 25m Rapid Fire Pistol Men at 12:45 a.m.

*Photo and editorial assistance provided by the ISSF


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

My Shooting Princess Slays Dragons

Do you remember when you were a princess, had huge dreams, climbed to the top of towers, and slew dragons? Hopefully, you’re still that girl (or guy!), so to speak. As we grow up and learn responsibility, respect, patience, and even fear, we sometimes forget where we started and worry about toppling. If we let the doubt take over, it will hold us back. Today, take a minute and remember back to that time when you were carefree, and embraced the challenge of slaying dragons.

Little-girl-pretends-to-slay-dragons-Lea-Leggitt-Mia-Anstine-photo

That’s a picture of my daughter. She might’ve been around four-years-old at that time. Yes, she was at the top of the jungle gym, slaying a dragon or monster of some sort. My, to have the imagination of a four-year-old! Something that I’ve never let her forget is that she can slay dragons. If you listen to this week’s MAC Outdoors podcast you’ll hear her tell some stories about conquering obstacles on the way to becoming an independent young lady.

Something I’ve never let her forget is that she can slay dragons. If you listen to this week’s MAC Outdoors podcast (linked below) you’ll hear her tell some stories about conquering obstacles on the way to becoming an independent young lady.

We dropped her off at college over a month ago. She hit the ground running and has embraced her classes, she’s meeting new people, and shooting more shotgun competitions than ever.

At one shotgun shoot, she encountered a “dragon” who discouraged but didn’t stop her. Listen up as she tells the story of intimidation, obstacles, and other challenges she faced as she shot at took first place in her class and division during that event.

I am very proud of the wonderful woman she has become. She is still my beautiful, little princess, and she’s slaying dragons. Be a dragon slayer — Metaphorically speaking, of course!


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Anthem of Empowerment for Women

I’ve spent some time helping a group of women who are empowering others. Shoot Like A Girl has made an immense impact on women, introducing them to shooting. Thier portable shooting ranges can be found at various Cabela’s and outdoors shows around the country through out the year. The virtual range is a great start and gives women a safe introduction to handgun, rifle, and archery shooting. This week the lady entrepreneurs are announcing the release of their single the “Shoot Like A Girl Anthem,” which describes their mission in a nutshell.


Shoot Like A Girl Launches Anthem of Empowerment for Women

Shoot Like A Girl AnthemAthens, AL – Shoot Like A Girl is excited to release their single “Shoot Like A Girl Anthem”, written by Tanya Davis and Michael Curtis. Tanya has seen success with her single “Home Again” and has been included on Grand Ole Opry radio with her single “Don’t be Cruel” featuring Vince Gill.  Shoot Like A Girl’s Anthem, performed by Nashville Star winner Angela Hacker, epitomizes the company’s brand of empowering women.
With an upbeat classic country tone, this song is a blast to sing along with and declare “I’m an outdoor lover, fight like a warrior, shoot like a girl”! Through this song, Shoot Like A Girl accomplished their goal of giving women an anthem that exudes the confidence that comes from shooting sports and spreading message women can be proud of. “This is the right time for the Shoot Like A Girl Anthem. We need a song that all young girls and women can look to for inspiration to achieve their goals. There are some extremely empowering lines in this song, that all women should be able to find strength in,” said Karen Butler, President of Shoot Like A Girl.
Download now to be a part of a hit in the making! The song is available for download on iTunes – http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1276629229?ls=1&app=itunes
On the release of their Anthem, Shoot Like A Girl is proud to launch their latest line of women’s apparel! Be a part of the empowerment of women by showing you Shoot Like A Girl! Featuring lines from their latest song “Shoot Like A Girl Anthem” these designs bring strong elegance to ladies and the world of shooting sports alike!

 

For sponsorship information or to learn more about SLG2, visit Shoot Like A Girl online, or visit at Facebook and Twitter.
About Shoot Like A Girl:
Shoot Like A Girl has become and remains an industry leader in growing the number of women in shooting sports by giving women across the country the experience of shooting a pistol, rifle, and bow in a safe controlled women friendly environment, that empowers them with the confidence they can shoot. Please recognize the following Shoot Like A Girl Corporate Partners who enable them to grow the number of women in shooting sports and change lives, one shot at a time:

Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.