Camping, Hiking, and Grizzly Bears on MAC Outdoors Podcast

Mia Anstine and Lea Leggitt share secret outdoor destinations and talk grizzly bears on this week’s MAC Outdoors Podcast.

mac-outdoors-1400In episode 021 of the MAC Outdoors Podcast with Mia and Lea the duo divulges secret high country destinations, discuss grizzly attacks, and the news of the delisting of the bears in the Yellowstone area.

If you’ve never been to Southwest Colorado you definitely need to add it to your vacation destination list. The area is prolific with hiking, camping, hunting, and wildlife viewing opportunities. Among the possibilities are elk, mule deer, bighorn sheep, mountain goats, and black bears.

Speaking of bears, Mia and Lea discuss the recent release of the Todd Orr double bear attack video. Todd Orr survives the attack and comes to us with his story. The MAC Outdoor show hosts want to know, “What Would You Do?” in the instance of an encounter with an aggressive bear. Comment or message them on their social media outlets (listed below).

Important links for this week’s show:

Show Host’s Social Outlets:

Legit Outdoors YouTube
Lea’s Facebook Page  
Lea’s Twitter
Mia Anstine YouTube
Mia’s Facebook Page
Mia’s Twitter

MAC Outdoors Podcast: Each week the dynamic mother/daughter duo share their hunting, shooting, and outdoor adventures. You’ll find tips, tricks, lessons, and tales from the trail. Mia is a mom, hunting guide, writer, and vlogger who lives on a ranch in Colorado. Her daughter, Lea, also a guide, is a passionate young hunter who’s recently finished high school and is prepping for the journey to college. TUNE IN because you never know what obstacles and inspiration they’ll encounter as they head outside for new adventures.


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Conservation Efforts Succeed in Recovering Grizzly Populations

Springtime Bear Awareness

Be bear aware when out and about this spring  

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – People and wildlife are getting outdoors more often now that spring has arrived, and the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish is reminding everyone to be aware of the greater chance of encountering bears and other native wildlife.

Males and young, independent bears are emerging from hibernation this time of year and they will be out foraging and seeking territory of their own, said Rick Winslow, the department’s bear and cougar biologist. Sows with cubs will follow in May, while cubs born last winter that spent this winter with their mother soon will be setting out on their own as their mothers seek to breed again.

http://tunein.com/embed/player/p963773/?autoplay=true

After three years of good precipitation following a long-running drought, bears will be very busy breeding and producing offspring, Winslow said.

Residents of wildland-urban interface areas such as the foothills of Santa Fe and Albuquerque or rural portions of the state may have a greater chance of encountering bears.

People are encouraged to call the department and report a bear that exhibits aggressive behavior. Bears that appear to be moving through the country should be left alone and there is no need to report them. Last year, several individuals were injured during encounters with bears.   

The department offers the following suggestions if you visit or live in bear country:

 

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  • Never leave fruit from trees and bushes to rot on the ground as it is a powerful attractant to bears and other wildlife.
  • Remove bird feeders. Bears see them ashigh calorietreats, and often they will look for other food sources nearby.
  • Never put meat or sweet-smelling food scraps such as melon in your compost pile.
  • Don’t leave pet food or food dishes outdoors at night.
  • Clean and store outdoor grills after use. Bears can smell sweet barbecue sauce and grease for miles.
  • Keep your camp clean, and store food and garbage properly at all times. Use bear-proof containers when available. If not, suspend food, toiletries, coolers and garbage from a tree at least 10 feet off the ground and 6 feet out from the tree trunk.
  • Keep your tent and sleeping bag free of all food smells. Store the clothes you wore while cooking or eating with your food.
  • Sleep a good distance from your cooking area or food storage site, 100 yards is recommended.
  • Never intentionally feed bears to attract them for viewing.

If you encounter a bear:

  • Make yourself appear large by holding out your jacket. If you have small children, pick them up so they don’t run.
  • Give the bear plenty of room to escape, so it doesn’t feel threatened or trapped. If a black bear attacks you, fight back using anything at your disposal, such as rocks, sticks, binoculars or even your bare hands. Aim for the bear’s nose and eyes.
  • If the bear has not seen you, stay calm and slowly move away, making noise so the bear knows you are there. Never get between a mother bear and her cubs.

For more information about living with bears in New Mexico please visit www.wildlife.state.nm.us and consult the publication “Living with Large Predators.”


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Learn to Hunt Bears

Learn to hunt bears at workshop in Ridgway, March 14

CPW_SiteLogoRidgway, Colo. — If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears or if you want to improve your chances of harvesting one, plan to attend a workshop sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife on March 14 in Ridgway.

Bear populations are healthy in western Colorado, providing hunters a unique hunting opportunity.

CPW’s district wildlife managers will lead the presentation on hunting Colorado’s black bears. They’ll discuss bear biology, hunting tactics, field dressing, rules and regulations, and human-bear conflict issues.

 

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The majority of the bear harvest takes place in September when the animals are foraging heavily for acorns and berries in preparation for their winter hibernation. The greater Montrose area offers ideal habitat for bears; so a hunter’s chances of having a successful hunt are high ‒ if they know where to go.

The class will be held 6-8:30 p.m., March 14 at the Ridgway Town Hall, 201 N. Railroad. The class will be limited to 25 people, and registration is required. To register, call the Montrose Parks and Wildlife office at 970-252-600

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Learn to Hunt Bear – CPW

Learn to hunt bears at workshop in Ridgway, March 14

CPW_SiteLogoMONTROSE, Colo. — If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears or if you want to improve your chances of harvesting one, plan to attend a workshop sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife on March 14 in Ridgway.

Bear populations are healthy in western Colorado, providing hunters a unique hunting opportunity.

CPW’s district wildlife managers will lead the presentation on hunting Colorado’s black bears. They’ll discuss bear biology, hunting tactics, field dressing, rules and regulations, and human-bear conflict issues.

Mia Anstine black bear wp feature image mathews archery

The majority of the bear harvest takes place in September when the animals are foraging heavily for acorns and berries in preparation for their winter hibernation. The greater Montrose area offers ideal habitat for bears; so a hunter’s chances of having a successful hunt are high ‒ if they know where to go.

The class will be held 6-8:30 p.m., March 14 at the Ridgway Town Hall, 201 N. Railroad. The class will be limited to 25 people, and registration is required. To register, call the Montrose Parks and Wildlife office at 970-252-6000.

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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Archery Alaskan Brown Bear Hunt

We all run into people who become mentors in our lives. I’d never call it envy, but we want to to learn to be like them. I’ve made several friends while I’ve been on the Four Corners Safari Club board of directors. One now serves as president of the Pope and Young Club. He has taken the passion of archery hunting to the next level. He’s quite an accomplished bow hunter. We hope to have such grand accomplishments in our hunting years.

Jim Willems lives “the life”. As a bow hunter he is always out and about having adventures of a lifetime. This fall, he’s had a successful one with his recurve bow he harvested a beautiful bull elk in Utah and a Shiras Bull Moose in Colorado. In the share you’ll see below, he adds an even more exciting close encounter with his compound bow to his year of hunting.


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Friends,

I recently returned from a 2 week Kodiak brown bear hunt with Afognak Wilderness Lodge on Afognak and Shuyak Islands. They have some really big bears on the islands which is why I chose to hunt there. After much consideration I decided my 57# recurve bow might not be enough, so I settled on the 80# Hoyt compound I bought a while back for cape buffalo. They had video of a really good bear a few days before I got there, so I was very excited about my chances to get something really special. We hunted for that bear for a few days and never found him. I was able to get close to a few boars that were not quite big enough before we found a dead whale on an island on day 5. We found a huge track there and watched 16 different bears feed on the whale that day. The big one didn’t show up so we figured he was going to be mostly nocturnal. We set up before daylight the next morning and could see he was there alone. There was a nice 9’ boar walking around waiting his turn which made the stalk more interesting. We snuck up on the beast and I shot him at 28 yards. The first shot was a little low but still in the chest. He never ran but instead started walking away on the beach which took him right past me at 15 yards. My second shot was perfect and now he was really hurting. The other bear on the beach was causing him some concern so he turned and walked up the hill toward us. He walked by at about 8 yards and stumbled like he was going down. At this point he caught our wind and turned and lunged right toward us. My guide had to shoot him at 10’ which was the right thing to do but was such a heart breaker. He was within seconds of dying from the arrow wounds.

Jim Wellims with his Alaskan brown bear.
Jim Willems with his Alaskan brown bear.

They kept saying it could be the biggest bear they had ever taken; so we figured out a way to get it loaded whole and took it back to the lodge. They flew in a hanging scale so we could weigh him. After gallons of blood loss he weighed 1,417 pounds. He would have been close to 1,450 pounds while alive. His hide squared 10’4”. He was 7’10” around the belly and 9’1” nose to tail.

Amber joined me just hours after I shot the bear and she was able to take a nice sitka blacktail deer as well as some great foxes and waterfowl. What a great time.

I booked the hunt through Bowhunting Safari Consulants. They are always on the lookout for hunts that work for bow hunters. Luke Randall was my guide and is great to hunt with. I highly recommend Afognak Wilderness Lodge. Luke claims his father sometimes worked for the outfitter that guided Fred Bear on his famous brown bear hunt where he shoots from behind the rock back in 1960. They say that Fred actually shot his bear on Shuyak Island not far from where I shot this bear. I kept looking for that rock but I’m not sure I found it. It was another hunt of a lifetime and by now I’ve had more than I deserve.

Jim


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Learn to Bear Hunt

Several urban areas of western Colorado have become inundated with black bears so for some it may sound simple to harvest one. The fact of the matter is you can’t just shoot a bear in your neighborhood to fill your hunting tag. It would not be safe or ethical to discharging a gun at a bear, who happens to be digging through you trashcan. That being said, you need to get out in the woods and actually HUNT. Bear hunting, sans bait, can be a challenge. Fortunately, there is help.


LEARN TO HUNT BEARS AT MONTROSE WORKSHOP, MARCH 8


MONTROSE, Colo. — If you’ve ever wanted to hunt bears or if you want to improve your chances of harvesting one, plan to attend a workshop sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife on March 8, in Montrose.

Bear populations are healthy in western Colorado, providing hunters a unique hunting opportunity. 

Tony Bonacquista, a district wildlife manager, will lead the presentation on hunting Colorado’s black bears. He’ll discuss bear biology, hunting tactics, field dressing, rules and regulations, and human-bear conflict issues.  

“Bears are very challenging to hunt, but hunters who know where to look and how to hunt them can improve their success rates,” Bonacquista said.  

The majority of the bear harvest takes place in September when the animals are foraging heavily for acorns and berries in preparation for their winter hibernation. Areas around Montrose offer ideal habitat for bears so a hunter’s chances of having a successful hunt are high, if they know where to look. 

The class will be held at the Colorado Parks and Wildlife office in Montrose, 2300 S. Townsend Ave, 10 a.m to 1 p.m. Cost for the workshop is $10 which includes lunch. To register, call the Montrose Parks and Wildlife office at 970-252-6000. The class will be limited to 25 people.  

For more information about Colorado Parks and Wildlife go to: http://cpw.state.co.us.


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Bear Hunting – Why We Hunt

First Bear, Mia Anstine, September 18, 2010

 

One thing that amazes me about people is their reaction to specific hunting photos. I may post one, two or three photos of a mule deer buck and receive kudos, but one photo of a three-hundred-pound bear and the reaction is quite a bit different. Why?!

The primary reason people don’t like to see pictures of a bear harvest is that they think “You eat the deer, but you don’t eat the bear.” Wrong! Bear meat can be quite delicious.

Another reason people dislike pictures of a bear harvest is….. (To read the remainder of this article click HERE)

Lyle & bear cubs


“Spend more time with your family and friends, whether it be outside, hunting, at the shooting range or around the table, savoring all life has to offer.” MM


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Bear Hunting – Read a Mia & the Little Gal adventure at the WON

The Little Gal (LG) is a member of a club called Youth Hunter Education Challenge YHEC). It teaches kids hunting, responsibility, wildlife identification, orienteering and survival skills. Locally, our Safari Club International (SCI) chapter makes significant contributions to this youth program.

At the 2012 SCI banquet we bought a hunt for two to Alberta, Canada. LG and I were going black bear hunting!

Read the rest of this bear hunting story by clicking here!
Mia & the Little Gal - A bear hunting adventure in Alberta, Canada


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Hunting and why it’s NOT a wasted tag

Friends, and sometimes strangers, ask why I tend buy a license(tag) for any season I am allowed, even if I may only get one day to hunt. Sometimes the odds are against me that the tag will be filled, but I purchase one just in-case I get to go hunt that species. There is another more important reason I don’t hesitate to spend my money on them. My money goes to a good cause.

I say over and over again “It is not a wasted tag.” What does that mean? It means my money is going to support conservation, wildlife, habitat and research. I can go buy a new pair of sunglasses, a fancy dinner or new clothes anytime. Those are just things and there is not long-term reward in them. Rather than being a shop-a-holic, I am a hunt-a-holic. I figure if I’m going to “blow my money”, I will blow it on something that will benefit the outdoors and wildlife for years to come. I buy hunting tags.

Here is a video from the BBC. It includes my friends and a fellow SCI board member who work for Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Here is what our money goes to. Wild life research and conservation. This is an amazing project that is being done right here in Durango, Colorado. It is a first hand look at what is NOT a wasted tag.

Click the link below to view the video.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-21890034

bear cub

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Mia & the Little Gal at the Women’s Outdoor News

Visit Prois Hunting  – Hunting and field apparel for women.

Visit TenPoint Crossbows  – “The mark of perfection” in crossbows

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