Colorado Elk Habitat and Hunting Access

“Thanks to funds provided by Great Outdoors Colorado and CPW’s Habitat Stamp Program, a very valuable stretch of land is now protected through the CWHP. Some limited public hunting access will also be provided so the benefits of this easement will pay dividends well into the future.” — Bill de Vergie, CPW area wildlife manager.

Elk Habitat Protected, Hunting Access Improved in Colorado

MISSOULA, Mont.—Thanks to a conservation-minded landowner and a key state funding program, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation joined Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to permanently protect 2,677 acres of vital elk habitat in northwest Colorado.

“We are grateful to Rick Tingle, a RMEF life member, for placing a conservation easement on his Louisiana Purchase Ranch,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Additionally, this project highlights the critical need for the Colorado Wildlife Habitat Program (CWHP) and its Habitat Stamp which supplied important funding to help push things through to the finish line.”

“With a fast-growing human population, it is more important than ever before to ensure the state’s wildlife has the habitat it needs to survive in perpetuity,” said Bill de Vergie, CPW area wildlife manager. “Thanks to funds provided by Great Outdoors Colorado and CPW’s Habitat Stamp Program, a very valuable stretch of land is now protected through the CWHP. Some limited public hunting access will also be provided so the benefits of this easement will pay dividends well into the future.”

CWHP provides a means for CPW to work with private landowners, local governments, and conservation organizations to protect important fish and wildlife habitat and provide places for people to enjoy opportunities to hunt and fish.

Since the ranch is bordered on three sides by State Land Board and Bureau of Land Management land in a part of the state home to Colorado’s largest elk herds, it provides connectivity for elk and mule deer migration. Thousands of elk pass through the area during the spring and fall. The property also provides summer and winter range for both species and other wildlife.

“This truly is a special place,” said David Allen, RMEF president, and CEO, who has visited the location. “We are grateful to the Tingle family for recognizing and helping us protect the wildlife values of this land.”

Access is improved to surrounding public lands because the landowner will provide perpetual unlimited permission to public hunters for a 25-day period each year with drive-through access. In addition, he signed off on a 10-year CPW agreement to provide access for six elk and/or deer hunters on lands off County Road 23 during a three-day window during Colorado’s third rifle season.

Since 1987, RMEF and its partners completed 726 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Colorado with a combined value of more than $165.2 million. These projects protected or enhanced 447,910 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 107,992 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org, www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Shed Hunting Restrictions in Colorado

If you’re a fan of wildlife and a fan of collecting the antlers bucks and bulls leave behind every spring, you need to read this update from Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission approves shed antler and horn collection seasonal restrictions at January meeting

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER, Colo. – On Thursday, January 11, 2018, the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission voted unanimously to approve the creation of a seasonal closure on shed antler and horn collection on all public lands west of I-25 from January 1 through April 30 annually. Today’s decision will take effect on these public lands beginning March 1, 2018. Additionally, in order to maintain protection for the Gunnison sage-grouse, the new regulations include a closure to collection of shed antlers on public lands May 1 to May 15 from sunset to 10 a.m. in the Gunnison basin (Game Management Units 54, 55, 66, 67, 551).

CPW staff have been examining the issue for months, first introducing an antler and horn collection issue paper in September of 2017 that suggested a closure be put in place on all public lands west of I-25 from January 1 through April 30 annually. The purpose of this request was to reduce the recreational impacts from shed hunting on wintering big game animals during the time of year when deer, elk, pronghorn, and moose are most vulnerable to stress. The result of this stress can be decreased body condition, increased mortality, and decreased fawn/calf survival.

The CPW Commission discussed the pros and cons of implementing these changes at its January 11 meeting. Much of the debate between commissioners at Thursday’s meeting revolved around the potential for including an associated license/permit for shed antler and horn collection. Wildlife is synonymous with Colorado and their health and sustainability is a primary focus for CPW staff. The seasonal closure, also being discussed, was met with broad public and agency support.

During the discussion on whether to approve just the seasonal collection closure, or a closure with a fee-based permit, Commissioner Alexander Zipp said, “I’d like to start with just a time restriction, without the fees. This is not a money-making decision. This is a wildlife regulation matter.”

Winter can be extremely difficult on wildlife as body weight is down and access to food is very limited. The survival of wildlife relies heavily on keeping as many calories as possible until the green shoots pop up, heralding spring’s return.

Commissioner Robert Bray summed up the discussion, saying he’d like CPW staff to further research a fee or registration option, but more importantly to create an education campaign on why these new regulations are being put into place and how all recreational can play a role in helping wildlife get through the winter.

Complete background information on this agenda item can be found on the CPW website.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Things To-Do for Sportsmen and Wildlife

I began the morning reflecting on the year and got sucked into a tangled political and religious rant, which I’ve decided not to share. I chose to push the re-start button and do some more positive reflecting on the last year. I began with, “What have I done and what things will I do?”

I’ve sat on the Colorado Sportsman’s Roundtable Committee for several years and am nearing the end of my second term. I wonder what I can do to further my outreach and speak up for sportsmen, wildlife, and the future generations. Last year I submitted an application for the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commision. I know I can make a difference on the panel. I also know I have much to learn.

 

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Boats in the mist at Navajo Lake State Park. CPW Photo

 

This year I plan to continue my work and learn as much as I can about the vastly complicated inner workings of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife(CPW) organization. As I attend public meetings and meet face to face with hunters and anglers, many of them present complaints and objections to or about items of which they don’t fully understand.

What I’ve learned is that before we become staunch in our objections or criticisms, the thing to do is educate ourselves. Many complaints are about the management of funds. (I find it a bit amusing because it seems people always think they know what other people’s financial situations are. Why shouldn’t they be the same with a huge organization like CPW?)

I attended several Commission meetings last year and while some consider the meetings mundane, I learned a plethora about the organization and what they’re doing with our funds. The meetings are held somewhat bi-monthly and in areas throughout the state. What I recommend is that you attend one when it’s in your area. You may be surprised when you learn about all the projects CPW has going on, how funds are allocated, and when and how they’re allowed to use them.

The thing-to-do is get involved. The next meeting is January 11 in Denver, Colorado. I’ve shared additional information about the meeting below. If you can’t make that meeting, here is a link to the year’s schedule. MEETING DATES

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to meet January 11 in Denver 

DENVER, Colo. – The Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission will discuss a citizen petition allowing the launching of paragliders from Smelter Mountain in the Bodo State Wildlife Area, a citizen petition on a new type of wildlife educators license, adding hand-operated foldable plastic boats to the list of exempted vessels that can be hand-launched without a boat inspection, implementing an antler and horn collection closure on public lands west of I-25 from January 1 through April 30 annually, and CPW’s new purchasing system at its January meeting. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, January 11 and adjourn at 5 p.m. at 6060 Broadway, Denver, CO 80216.

Additional items include:

  • Annual review of big game regulations (including annual changes to season dates, limited license areas, quotas and manner of take provisions for bighorn sheep and mountain goat)
  • Lake Licenses and related regulations
  • Annual review of small game regulations
  • Annual review of wildlife properties controlled by the Division of Parks and Wildlife, including State Trust Lands leased by the Division
  • Herd Management Plan Process

complete agenda for this meeting can be found on the CPW website, http://cpw.state.co.us.

The commission meets regularly and travels to communities around the state to facilitate public participation. Anyone can listen to commission meetings through the CPW website. This opportunity keeps constituents informed about the development of regulations and how the commission works with Parks and Wildlife staff to manage the parks, wildlife and outdoor recreation programs administered by the agency. Find out more about the commission on the CPW website.

The next commission meeting will take place February 7 and 8 in Denver.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

 

Hunting & Fishing – Colorado’s New Licensing System

Change is a challenge and I’ve already seen resistance to the coming licensing system in Colorado. Stress is not healthy, but getting outdoors, fishing, hunting, hiking, and exploring sure are. Let’s keep that in mind and look toward the new system with a positive attitude.

 

Colorado Parks and Wildlife announces new agency-wide integrated purchasing system

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is pleased to announce the arrival of a new integrated purchasing system, which will serve as a one-stop shop for all CPW products, including hunting and fishing licenses, campsite reservations, OHV and snowmobile permits, and more.

The transition to the new purchasing system will begin January 1, 2018. During this time, we will have a period of several days when all CPW purchases will be unavailable. The changeover to the new system will cause a temporary shut down of purchasing services at all CPW offices, parks, licensing agents, online and phone sales. Hunters may reach out to a regional or area office if you run into licensing issues.

“We are thrilled to roll out this updated purchasing system, which will provide a more streamlined experience for every CPW customer,” said Bob Broscheid, Director of Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “But we do want to acknowledge the small downside of this brief system blackout for purchases while we implement these upgrades.”

During the changeover to our new system, customers will not be able to make any purchases online or at our offices, parks or sales agencies. All purchases will be impacted, including:

  • All camping, cabin and yurt reservations
  • Online hunter education, including mountain lion exams
  • Hunting reservation system
  • All license purchases (Including waterfowl stamps)
  • Habitat stamps
  • Online park passes
  • All registration renewals
  • Online retail orders
  • Online license purchases

“We really want to get the word out for customers to plan ahead and be aware that this brief transitional period is coming,” said Broscheid.

CPW suggests that customers prepare now by taking the following steps:

Plan ahead, buy ahead: Customers are urged to plan ahead and buy ahead for courses, licenses, reservations or gifts that can be purchased or reserved in advance. If you are a camping customer planning to camp in the next 6 months, book your reservations now. If you are an established mountain lion hunter in Colorado and know exactly when you plan to hunt, purchase your winter 2017-2018 license before December 31, 2017.

Create a new CID: CPW strongly recommends that any hunter that has never hunted or fished in Colorado create a customer identification number (CID) in our system in advance of this system update. This will ensure a smooth transition into the new system. New hunters are able to create an account and receive a CID during business hours by calling any CPW office or the main telephone number, 303-291-1192.

Prepare for new account requirements: Please ensure every customer in your family or group, including children, have a separate and valid email address. Each individual making a purchase, including youth licenses, will need an individual account in the system.

For a full list of Frequently Asked Questions and to learn more about what the new integrated purchasing system means for you, visit cpw.state.co.us/cpwshop.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Counting Fish for Conservation – Colorado

For many of us catching a fish means recreation, conservation, and catch and release. For others, it means counting on landing one to fry up for dinner. My, oh my, how I love a fresh brookie at my high mountain camp.

When you purchase a license to fish or hunt do you ever wondered where your money goes? I’m currently serving my second term on the Colorado Sportsmen’s Roundtable  (CSR) committee, and what I hear from sportsmen I run into around the state is that they want to know what Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) does with the money.

I’ll tell you that the organization is doing a TON, and in order to truly understand where the money goes you need to become involved. I have learned a lot sitting on the CSR, but I’ve learned even more by attending the Commission meetings. This is an intense and deep topic, “Where does the money go?”

Today I want to share a research method that CPW biologists are using in a river near Pueblo, Colorado. It’s pretty extensive but should reveal more accurate numbers than standing in a body of water and trying to count fish as they swim by. I think it’s very interesting, and thought you might like to learn about it too.

Here is a small snippet of where your money goes.

Cold, wind can’t stop CPW biologists bent on surveying fish for conservation

CPW_SiteLogoPUEBLO, Colo. – Temperatures were below freezing and winds were gusting to 40 mph when aquatic biologists from Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Southeast Region set out on the Arkansas River, and in it, to conduct their annual fish survey early Monday, Dec. 4.

A team of six biologists, some hatchery staff and seasonal employees spent the first week of December catching, weighing and measuring as many fish as they could find in the Arkansas, working from two small rafts and starting at the base of the Lake Pueblo State Park dam.

As winds whipped violent waves and whitecaps on the reservoir above, heavily bundled biologists gathered at dawn and set out in the tailwaters below. The brutal conditions couldn’t stop the important conservation work that needed to be done.

The first raft was guided by a biologist who walked behind it in the frigid river water. It carried three biologists who took turns tossing an electrode into river and quickly reeling it back in. The device gently charged the water with electricity and attracted any fish in the vicinity, allowing the two others to quickly scoop them up in long nets and deposit them in live wells.

The crew of a small chase raft then took the fish for precise measurements. A small hole puncher was used to mark the tail fin in order to accurately calculate a population estimate during this mark and recapture survey. The team expected to handle about 500 fish per day.

“We are trying to get a an accurate population estimate of the number of fish per mile in certain sections of the river,” said Carrie Tucker, CPW aquatic biologist based in Pueblo. “This fish survey is important because it helps us determine if our fishing regulations are working and how many fish we need to stock”.

“We are looking for rainbow trout and brown trout, particularly. But we are also weighing and measuring suckers and any other game fish we find. We’ll get bass, saugeye and carp.”

The first survey was conducted in 2011 to assess the population of the tailwaters of the river and half-mile sections through Pueblo. It was repeated in 2015 and now is an annual event.

Josh Nehring, senior aquatic biologist, participated in the survey and said similar surveys are conducted on rivers across Colorado as part of the agency’s conservation work maintaining healthy fisheries and ensuring plenty of game fish exist for anglers.

“Despite the weather, this is a good time of year to conduct the survey because river levels are low allowing us to safely enter the river and do our work,” Nehring said. “And it’s kind of fun because we get to see so many big fish.”


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Record Fish Caught in Dillon, Colorado Reservoir

I grew up fishing in Colorado. We lived in a small house just across the road from the San Juan River. I learned to hook trout, and maybe a suckerfish or two, on my little Snoopy fishing pole. Since then I’ve had the joy of fishing in a variety of waters, but there is plenty of excitement to be found fishing the fresh water of Colorado.

If you’ve been wanted to get started fishing, now is as good a time as any.

Virginia woman catches state record arctic char in Dillon Reservoir

SUMMIT COUNTY, Colo.- One of the largest reservoirs in Colorado has produced a new state record arctic char, caught by a vacationing physician from Virginia, Nov. 6.Dr. Lindsay Regali of Charlottesville had been taking in the sights and enjoying a chilly day of fishing at altitude in Dillon Reservoir with her husband Luke Newcomb and local guide Randy Ford of Alpine Fishing Adventures when she landed the lunker. Colorado Parks and Wildlife certified the fish as the new state record, weighing in at 4.15 pounds and 23.5 inches in length, breaking the previous record of 3.75 pounds and 20.5 inches, caught in Dillon Reservoir in 1994 by Marshall Brenner.

Dr. Lindsay Regali of Virginia with her record breaking arctic char, recently caught in Dillon Reservoir
Dr. Lindsay Regali of Virginia with her record-breaking arctic char recently caught in Dillon Reservoir

“There was an ongoing joke throughout the day that I was jealous of how many fish my husband had been catching,” said Regali. “I was laughing and joking around because I realized I had finally caught one that I knew was bigger than his. I realized it was big but had no idea how big until we got it in the boat.”

Regali, a self-described casual angler, had initially been interested in the sights surrounding Dillon Reservoir more so than what lay beneath the surface.

“It was such a fun, unique experience to be fishing with snow coming down, surrounded by the Rocky Mountains. It was almost surreal,” said Regali. “Mostly, it was just a lot of fun and it was something I’ll definitely want to go back and do again.”

CPW first began stocking arctic char in Dillon in the 1990s. After a 10-year break, agency biologists began stocking the slow-growing fish again between 2008-15.

With the reservoir now yielding bigger specimens of the fish, a cousin to salmon and lake trout, CPW considers the stocking program a significant success.

“This has taken a lot of patience because they are growing slowly, but we seem to be at an inflection point in the fishery where I expect to see increasingly large fish, and more of them,” said Area Aquatic Biologist Jon Ewert. “The one Linsday caught was a nice, large fish and it’s very satisfying to see the excitement that it brought her. I’m sure news of the catch will attract other anglers to Dillon to see if they can break her record.”

Ewert reminds anglers about a regulation for arctic char in Dillon Reservoir; “Anglers can keep one fish over 20 inches. All arctic char less than 20 inches must be returned to the water immediately,” he said

Regali, whose father taught her to fish as a child, says the experience of catching a state record fish will remain with her for a lifetime.

“I immediately texted my parents from the boat and sent them a picture. I knew my dad especially would think it was pretty cool,” she said. “I still can’t believe it. I just went out there to have fun. I certainly didn’t go out to set a state record. It’s a good story to tell.”

Dillon Reservoir is the only public body of water in the lower 48 states, outside of Maine, in which arctic char can be caught. Most populations are found in Canada and the arctic regions.

For more information about fishing in Colorado, visit CPW’s website.

See other state record fish caught in Colorado.


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Change your clocks and your driving habits

As clocks change watch for wildlife on the highway

In a recent YouTube video, I shared a headlight cleaning hack, and a story about how I came to have one clean, shiny headlight and a dull one. You guessed it. I whacked a deer. While I pursue wildlife during hunting season, I don’t enjoy hitting them with my vehicle.

In our neck of the woods, we drive the “Gauntlet.” It’s called that because of the numbers of deer, elk, and other animals that we encounter on the route. You might also guess that when we change the clocks, and daylight visibility decreases, the numbers of animals on the road increase. We have to slow down and pay attention more closely.

Return to daylight standard time: Change your clocks and your driving habits

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER – November 5 marks the end of daylight saving time, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds motorists to be particularly cautious to avoid wildlife-related accidents on our roads as daylight hours get shorter.

“The fall time change happens to be right in line with peak mating season for some of our wildlife, especially deer. Bears are also still actively looking for food and the calories needed before hibernation,” said Crystal Chick, CPW area wildlife manager. “Animals are on the move this time of year, most actively between dawn and dusk. With shorter daylight hours, that makes wildlife harder to see right when people are making their daily commutes.”

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The Colorado Department of Transportation sees an average of 3,300 reported wildlife collisions each year, and notes more car accidents involving wildlife occur in November than in any other month. According to the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, the average property damage costs from animal-vehicle collisions is over $3,400.

The following precautions are good advice all year long, but particularly at and around the change back to daylight standard time:

  • Slow down. Swerving at high speeds increases the danger of an accident. Moderate speeds maintain a driver’s reaction time and allow an appropriate response to animals on or near roads.
  • Stay alert, particularly while driving between dusk and dawn. This is when deer and other common wildlife are most active and more likely to be crossing roadways.
  • Scan ahead and watch for movement and shining eyes along roadsides. If you see one animal, you should expect it will be accompanied by others.
  • Obey traffic signs, particularly wildlife warning signs. Though incidents can happen anywhere, transportation authorities attempt to reduce the number of incidents by posting signage and lowering speeds in areas where wildlife are active.
  • When animals are seen on or near the road, slow down or stop, honk the horn and/or flash headlights. This warns the animal to avoid the road and alerts other drivers to the potential hazard.
  • Always wear seat belts. Unfortunately, not every collision is avoidable, and the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration states that the risk of serious injury and death in a crash is reduced by half when seat belts are worn.

Drivers involved in a wildlife/vehicle collision should report the accident to the Colorado State Patrol by calling *CSP (star key and 277). For additional information on wildlife and traffic safety, visit cpw.state.co.us.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Wildlife Officers Helping Those in Africa

Many of us know that conserving wildlife extends beyond our borders and spans across the world to wonderful places, including Africa. I’m pleased to read this news. Colorado Parks and wildlife’s southeast region implemented a great plan to help other wildlife officers in Africa.

I’ve had the pleasure of meeting CPW’s Southeast Regional Director, Dan Prenzlow, at Colorado Sportsman’s Roundtable meetings. He’s a forward moving man, who is always striving to improve methods of conservation in his area. This year he authorized his crew to gather obsolete items, no longer used by the organization, to send to conservation officers in Africa.

It is great to see donations from the United States will be helping officers over there to conserve wildlife for future generations. Read below to learn more.

CPW ships boxes of donated conservation items to wildlife officers in Africa

CPW_SiteLogoCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – In recent weeks, large boxes packed with work pants, boots, shirts, socks, belts, spotting scopes, binoculars, backpacks and much more left the loading dock of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Southeast Region office bound for Africa.

They are part of a nine-state project to donate gear to conservation officers in six African nations, working in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. State Department and the Wild Tomorrow Fund, a New York-based nonprofit dedicated to protecting threatened and endangered species and the habitats they depend on for survival.

Frank McGee, CPW area wildlife manager, brought the idea back from a leadership program last fall at the National Conservation Training Center attended by conservation officers from 30 other state agencies as well as conservation agencies from 12 African nations.

“I learned a great deal about the struggles our African counterparts face on a daily basis,” McGee said. “As it is in the United States, conservation of natural resources can be complicated in Africa. In some countries there, things are pretty bleak.”

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Sorting through boxes of donated items on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Southeast Region loading dock are Kimberly Sams, left, administrative assistant for Area 14, and Brianna Fett, right, the region’s education and volunteer intern. Photo courtesy Colorado Parks and Wildlife / Bill Vogrin

One classmate asked if they would accept donations and what, exactly, they needed. It turned out their needs were pretty basic, McGee said. So he got permission from Dan Prenzlow, manager of CPW’s Southeast Region, to gather obsolete law enforcement items to donate to conservation officers in Africa.

“Our agency is dedicated to preserving wildlife and if we can help further that cause in Africa by donating old or obsolete items, I’m all for it,” Prenzlow said.

McGee asked his CPW colleagues to search their storage lockers for gear they no longer use and consider donating it. Soon, the CPW loading dock was stacked high with gear. As shipments from CPW and other state wildlife agencies started landing in Africa, Wild Tomorrow Fund staff reported they were having an immediate impact improving morale.

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Items donated by Colorado Parks and Wildlife Southeast Region are displayed by John Steward, executive director of the New York-based nonprofit Wild Tomorrow Fund, and Richard Penn-Sawyers, conservation manager for several of the Ezemvelo wildlife reserves. They posed at Ezemvelo’s Tembe Elephant Park wildlife preserve on the border of Mozambique. Photo courtesy Wild Tomorrow Fund.

The International Conservation Chiefs Academy (ICCA) hopes projects like this strengthen global law enforcement relationships to combat illegal wildlife trafficking. The ICCA works with 18 African nations and next year will add seven Southeast Asian countries.

CPW, alongside federal agencies, hosted 42 African conservation officials in Denver as they visited the U.S. in mid-September. Training programs included: adaptive leadership, peer group problem solving sessions, anti-corruption practices, relationship building, wildlife trafficking trends, forensics, evidence and inventory management, working across cultural differences and more.

CPW-African-conservation-officers-receive-donations-945eed53-5ce1-4647-9045-4c8ebeeaff6a
Unidentified African wildlife conservation officers at Ezemvelo’s Ndumo reserve try on the shorts and pants delivered from U.S. counterparts including the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Southeast Region. Photo courtesy Wild Tomorrow Fund.

“Colorado Parks and Wildlife is committed to conserving our wildlife resources here at home, and contributing to the global fight against wildlife trafficking,” Prenzlow said. “The criminals who illegally trade in wildlife and wildlife parts operate across borders. So it is imperative that agencies like Colorado Parks and Wildlife cooperate across borders to fight them and catch them.”


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

Affected By Hurricanes or Wildfires License Refunds Offered | Colorado Hunting

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is understanding of the affect recent natural disasters is having on out of state hunters. It’s great news to see that they are being supportive of out of state hunters who may need to change their hunting plans. Read on to see what a difference they’re making in a simple deed of granting requests for license refunds to hunters that need them.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife to provide hunting license refunds for those affected by hurricanes and western wildfires

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is issuing hunting license refunds and preference point restoration exceptions for hunters who had their Colorado hunts canceled due to Hurricane Harvey, Hurricane Irma, or one of the many wildfires burning in our western states. The fire exception is only for those fires that are burning outside the state of Colorado.

CPW Director Bob Broscheid said, “We’re making an emergency exception to our policy of only providing refunds 30 days prior to the start of the hunting season. We hope this provides some relief to the hurricane and fire victims, the first responders, and family members with their homes flooded.”

Requests for refunds are reviewed on a case-by-case basis and no refunds will be made for licenses that have been in the field. All refund requests must be submitted by January 31, 2018. Those affected should call Limited License Refund Coordinator Sarah Lovik at 303-291-7208.

When you call, be prepared to provide proof that you have been affected by the hurricanes or wildfires.

Acceptable documents include:

  • insurance claim number
  • FEMA number
  • copy of canceled hotel or flight reservations
  • affidavit with signed narrative stating why you had to cancel your trip

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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