Colorado Lion Management Plan to be Discussed

Sportsperson’s Roundtable in Durango, Feb. 20; lion management plan also to be discussed

DURANGO, Colo.  – If you are a hunter, angler, landowner or outfitter plan to attend a Sportspersons’ Roundtable, 6:30 p.m., Feb. 20 at the La Plata County Fairgrounds in Durango.

Local Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff will talk about current wildlife management and take input from the public on wildlife issues.

The meeting will also provide attendees a chance to meet Cory Chick, CPW’s new Southwest Region manager.

“We always look forward to hearing from the public about wildlife issues,” Chick said. “Hunters, anglers and landowners can provide us with their unique on-the-ground perspective of what they’re seeing out in the field.”

Wildlife managers will talk about aquatic and terrestrial topics, statewide and regional issues and programs. Some topics to be discussed will include elk herd management, native fish work and habitat concerns.

At the meeting, CPW wildlife managers will also discuss the new proposed plan for mountain lion management in Southwest Colorado. Mountain lions in Colorado have historically been managed on smaller, localized scales–similar to the management of Colorado’s deer and elk. Current research, however, shows that managing mountain lions on a landscape scale is more appropriate and effective. A careful review by CPW biologists of research studies on mountain lions from Colorado, Wyoming and Montana has helped wildlife managers evaluate populations and harvest objectives that align with the best available science to better meet public desires.

For more information contact Joe Lewandowski at joe.lewandowski@state.co,us, or at 970-375-6708.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.