Recreational Access to Wild Landscapes by RMEF and BLM

An earlier post seems to have shared with a broken link to information about sportsmen and public land access, so I’m trying it again with this news about Recreational Access to lands. Let me know how it goes!

National Program Critical for Recreational Access

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MISSOULA, Mont.—A funding mechanism with a long name provides long-lasting benefits for hunters, anglers, hikers and others seeking improved access to America’s wild landscapes.

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation recently partnered with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to leverage more than $1 million in appropriations from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Priority Recreation Access program to open or improve access to nearly 55,000 acres of public land across four states.

Congress recently boosted LWCF to $425 million—a $25 million increase over 2017 but it did not permanently reauthorize the program which is set to expire September 30.

“LWCF is absolutely vital if we want to continue to permanently protect and provide access to habitat for elk and other wildlife,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation calls on Congress to permanently reauthorize this crucial program.”

RMEF’s most recent LWCF project was the conveyance of a 93-acre tract of land, known as the Cow Island Trail project, to the BLM that improves access to more than 6,000 acres of adjacent public land in north-central Montana’s Missouri River Breaks region.

“Expanding access to public lands for hunting and fishing is one of the BLM’s top priorities,” said Brian Steed, BLM deputy director for policy and programs. “Partnering with RMEF allows us to utilize critical funding to secure access to parcels like the Cow Island Trail project, which in turn broadens access now and ensures it for the future.”

Below is a list of RMEF-BLM projects utilizing LWCF-Priority Recreation Access funding.

RMEF Project (Amount in LWCF Funding)
Cache Creek, California ($321,000)
Cow Island Trail, Montana ($97,500)
La Barge Creek, Wyoming ($192,000)
Tex Creek IV, Idaho ($400,000)

LWCF helps conserve wild and undeveloped places, cultural heritage and benefits fish, wildlife and recreation. Its funding comes from royalties paid by energy companies drilling for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf. The royalties bring in $900 million annually, most of which is diverted to other federal programs.

“It takes great partners like the BLM to provide improved access opportunities for sportsmen and women but it also takes funding. These LWCF-Priority Recreation Access funds are absolutely critical in both conserving prime wildlife habitat and opening or improving access to it,” added Henning.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org, elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Lory 23, Hikers overlooking the Lake and surrounding scenery, Lory

NEW Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation President and CEO Announced

RMEF Announces New President and CEO

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Board of Directors this week announced Kyle Weaver as the new President and CEO, effective June 30, 2018.

“It is a tremendous honor to serve as the leader of the most respected wildlife conservation organization in the country, one that does so much for elk, elk habitat and America’s hunting tradition,” said Weaver. “Moving forward, as a team, we will elevate the delivery of RMEF’s mission, including our lands and access work as well as advocating for our hunting heritage.”

Weaver comes to RMEF from a long and successful career with the National Rifle Association, where he rose from an entry level position to ultimately serve as an NRA Officer and Executive Director of General Operations. His oversight included educational, safety and training programs, grassroots fundraising, as well as hunting and conservation programs. He brings extensive experience with board relations, volunteer management and fiscal responsibility and oversight, along with program building and implementation.

“My entire career has been dedicated to protecting, promoting and supporting our rights in the outdoors as hunters and conservationists. I am excited and welcome this opportunity. I look forward to using my full energy to serve our donors, members, volunteers, partners and sportsmen and women everywhere in furthering RMEF’s conservation mission,” added Weaver.

“We are excited to have Kyle join us and look forward to his leadership as we build on the success of RMEF,” said Philip Barrett, chairman of the RMEF Board of Directors. “We want to thank DBA Executive Search & Recruitment for leading this extensive nationwide search process that yielded an incredible field of candidates.”

Larry Potterfield, a long-time friend of Kyle, lifelong hunter, author, decorated business leader and founder and CEO of Midway USA, added, “The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation plays a critical role in the conservation of one of America’s great wildlife resources. Its long-term success is critical for the preservation of the species and the rights of hunters. Kyle Weaver is the perfect choice to lead this great organization into the future.”

A passionate and avid hunter, Weaver has supported RMEF for well over a decade and is a life member.

Currently, the RMEF president and CEO position is held by Nancy Holland, who stepped into the role in February from her board position to facilitate the transition to the new leadership.

“I am excited for Kyle and RMEF, he brings a strong business acumen and a commitment to conservation. A powerful combination to move RMEF forward and further establish its leadership role in the conservation community,” said Holland. Upon completion of this transition, Nancy will return to her role on RMEF’s Board of Directors.

Kyle is a graduate of Longwood University in Virginia, where he attended on a collegiate baseball scholarship. Weaver is a founding board member and current Chairman of the Fathers in the Field mentoring ministry.

He, wife Ashley and their family will be relocating to Missoula.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org, elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


 

RMEF Funding Benefits Colorado Elk

It’s nice to see some of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation’s funding go toward local elk habitat and research needs.

Funding Benefits Colorado Elk Habitat, Research

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation awarded $212,707 in grant funding for 16 habitat enhancement, research and hunting heritage projects in Colorado.

Those projects benefit nearly 15,000 acres of habitat for elk and other wildlife in Archuleta, Chaffee, Conejos, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Huerfano, Mineral, Montrose, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Rio Grande and Saguache Counties. There is also one project of statewide benefit.

“There is an ongoing need to apply active forest management techniques like prescribed burning and forest thinning across Colorado elk country. Such conservation work enhances wildlife habitat but it also improves overall forest health,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Grant funding will also assist scientific research to help managers track and better manage elk herds.”

RMEF has nearly 17,000 members and 28 chapters in Colorado. RMEF volunteers generated the funding by hosting banquets, membership drives and other events.

Since 1987, RMEF and its partners completed 728 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Colorado with a combined value of more than $167 million. These projects protected or enhanced 448,691 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 107,992 acres.

Here is a sampling of projects, listed by county:

Archuleta County—

Apply noxious weed treatments across 300 acres of meadows, including elk calving grounds, within the upper portion of the First Fork of Piedra River drainage on the San Juan National Forest.

Gunnison County—

Provide funding to capture and collar 30-40 elk to assist biologists and game managers as they learn more about grazing, hunting, habitat and other factors that affect the habits of migratory elk in the Gunnison National Forest and on Bureau of Land Management land (also benefits Saguache County).

Montrose County—

Restore a non-functioning wildlife water development on the Uncompahgre Plateau that is elk winter range within the Uncompahgre National Forest.

Rio Blanco County—

Prescribe burn 10,000 acres in six to eight different burn areas across four ranger districts on the White River National Forest to benefit wildlife habitat and overall forest health (also benefits Garfield, Eagle and Pitkin Counties).

Go here for a full project listing.

Colorado project partners include the Arapaho, Rio Grande, San Isabel, San Juan, White River and Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests, Bureau of Land Management, Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and various sportsmen, civic and outdoor industry and business groups.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org, elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Conservation Accomplishments Celebrated at RMEF Elk Camp

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation celebrated its growing mission accomplishment at its just-completed 2018 Elk Camp in suburban Phoenix, Arizona.

“It is always great when we gather at Elk Camp to feel the excitement and synergy of our members, volunteers and conservation partners who are dedicated to our mission,” said Nancy Holland, RMEF president and CEO. “And getting together in Phoenix was certainly no different. Now our task going forward is to translate that energy and momentum into on-the-ground results that benefit elk and elk country.”

Elk Camp highlights:

  • Department of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke emphasized the growing need for additional access to public land, active forest management and touted the role hunters play in conservation
  • Renown conservationist/wildlife researcher Shane Mahoney spoke about his Wild Harvest Initiative which aims to evaluate the biomass and economic value of wild food harvested by hunters and anglers
  • Recognition of RMEF chapters and volunteers
  • Presented Conservationist of the Year Award to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for its past and ongoing elk restoration efforts
  • Presented Wallace Fennell Pate Award to Andrew Hoxsey
  • Celebrated the five-year anniversary of the
  • Torstenson Family Endowment World premieres of “The Bronx Hunter” from RMEF Films and “Both Sides of the Fence #Private or Public” from Jason Matzinger
  • Musical performances by Mark Chesnutt, Chuck Wicks, Glen Templeton and Craig Campbell

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.orgwww.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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Colorado Elk Habitat and Hunting Access

“Thanks to funds provided by Great Outdoors Colorado and CPW’s Habitat Stamp Program, a very valuable stretch of land is now protected through the CWHP. Some limited public hunting access will also be provided so the benefits of this easement will pay dividends well into the future.” — Bill de Vergie, CPW area wildlife manager.

Elk Habitat Protected, Hunting Access Improved in Colorado

MISSOULA, Mont.—Thanks to a conservation-minded landowner and a key state funding program, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation joined Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to permanently protect 2,677 acres of vital elk habitat in northwest Colorado.

“We are grateful to Rick Tingle, a RMEF life member, for placing a conservation easement on his Louisiana Purchase Ranch,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Additionally, this project highlights the critical need for the Colorado Wildlife Habitat Program (CWHP) and its Habitat Stamp which supplied important funding to help push things through to the finish line.”

“With a fast-growing human population, it is more important than ever before to ensure the state’s wildlife has the habitat it needs to survive in perpetuity,” said Bill de Vergie, CPW area wildlife manager. “Thanks to funds provided by Great Outdoors Colorado and CPW’s Habitat Stamp Program, a very valuable stretch of land is now protected through the CWHP. Some limited public hunting access will also be provided so the benefits of this easement will pay dividends well into the future.”

CWHP provides a means for CPW to work with private landowners, local governments, and conservation organizations to protect important fish and wildlife habitat and provide places for people to enjoy opportunities to hunt and fish.

Since the ranch is bordered on three sides by State Land Board and Bureau of Land Management land in a part of the state home to Colorado’s largest elk herds, it provides connectivity for elk and mule deer migration. Thousands of elk pass through the area during the spring and fall. The property also provides summer and winter range for both species and other wildlife.

“This truly is a special place,” said David Allen, RMEF president, and CEO, who has visited the location. “We are grateful to the Tingle family for recognizing and helping us protect the wildlife values of this land.”

Access is improved to surrounding public lands because the landowner will provide perpetual unlimited permission to public hunters for a 25-day period each year with drive-through access. In addition, he signed off on a 10-year CPW agreement to provide access for six elk and/or deer hunters on lands off County Road 23 during a three-day window during Colorado’s third rifle season.

Since 1987, RMEF and its partners completed 726 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in Colorado with a combined value of more than $165.2 million. These projects protected or enhanced 447,910 acres of habitat and opened or improved public access to 107,992 acres.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org, www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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New Mexico Elk Habitat Supported by RMEF

In the hunting world, New Mexico is known for its divine elk herds. This wouldn’t be possible without habitat to support the animals. The state has set aside land trusts, which are designated as draw only units, and they are well managed. Throughout the state, however, there are other magnificent hunting areas. Thanks to the help of conservation organizations, such as Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the habitat will be sustained and the herds will remain healthy.

Grants Enhance New Mexico Elk Habitat, Hunting Heritage

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The grants benefit 4,670 acres across Bernalillo, Catron, Curry, Grant, Lincoln, Otero, Roosevelt, San Juan, San Miguel and Torrance Counties. There are also two projects of statewide benefit and another that benefits northeast Arizona.

“Water is at a high premium across New Mexico’s arid landscape,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Nearly a third of our projects this year focus on improving water sources for elk and other wildlife.”

RMEF members in New Mexico raised the funds via banquets, membership drives and other efforts.

Since 1985, RMEF and its partners completed 374 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects in New Mexico with a combined value of more than $42.9 million. These projects conserved and enhanced 512,691 acres of habitat and opened or secured public access to 88,958 acres.

Here is a sampling of the 2017 projects, listed by county:

Catron County—Mechanically treat 350 acres of Bureau of Land Management managed land in the Coyote Peak area in preparation for a future prescribed burn as part of a multi-year effort to maintain and enhance elk and mule deer across the Pelona Mountain landscape.

Grant County—Prescribe burn 320 acres in the Mimbres Valley to remove encroaching pinyon-juniper as part of an ongoing effort to reintroduce and maintain fire on the landscape and benefit wildlife habitat across the Gila National Forest.

Lincoln County—Create four small wetlands and expand another to benefit 800 acres in the Smokey Bear Ranger District on the Lincoln National Forest as well as construct a fence around each to limit the use to wildlife in an area where the elk population tripled over the last ten years.

Go here for a complete project listing.

New Mexico project partners include Cibola, Gila, Lincoln and Santa Fe National Forests, Bureau of Land Management and New Mexico Department of Game and Fish as well as sportsmen, civic and other organizations.


About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org, www.elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


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Conservation Efforts Succeed in Recovering Grizzly Populations

Renowned Conservationist and RMEF Promote Relevance of Hunting

Renowned Conservationist, RMEF Promote Relevance of Hunting

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MISSOULA, Mont.—In an effort to promote a wider public conversation about the positive connections between hunting and wildlife conservation, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation partnered with widely-respected conservationist and wildlife researcher Shane Mahoney to release a timely and evocative short film titled Relevance.

The video, which discusses the modern relevance of hunting traditions, especially in terms of conservation benefits, is the first product generated as part of a new and ongoing collaboration between RMEF and Mahoney.

“Shane is one of the world’s leading voices for conservation,” said Steve Decker, RMEF’s vice president of Marketing. “His message about hunting’s role in society showcases the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, certainly one of the most successful systems of wildlife recovery and management the world has ever seen. Shane’s message resonates not only among sportsmen and women but also with those who do not hunt or fish but who share in the concern for wildlife’s future.”

The film’s narrative is borrowed from Mahoney’s keynote address, delivered at RMEF’s 2017 National Convention earlier this year in Nashville.

Mahoney, a long-time RMEF member, is the president and CEO of Conservation Visions, a global wildlife initiative focused on international conservation issues.

“Hunting is sometimes incorrectly viewed as a self-indulgent and wasteful anachronism in modern society,” says Mahoney. “However, we know, from an objective perspective, that sustainable use of wildlife can be an effective tool in support of conservation and human livelihoods; it is connected to the conservation of wild lands and waters, the environment, and our own food security.”

 

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In 2015, Mahoney launched the Wild Harvest Initiative, a multi-year research, and communication effort supported by RMEF and a diverse partnership of individuals, business interests, conservation NGOs and government agencies. The project’s mission is to provide a first-ever evaluation of the biomass and economic value of wild food harvested by recreational hunters and anglers in Canada and the United States and to assess the wider community of consumers who share in this harvest. By conjoining these insights with existing economic assessments of recreational hunting and angling, and by evaluating the costs and mechanisms that might be considered necessary to replace this wild food harvest, the Wild Harvest Initiative will help focus a wider question facing conservation policy institutions in both countries; namely, if hunting and angling were to cease tomorrow, what would be the consequences?

 

RMEF and Mahoney will work together on future projects as part of RMEF’s ongoing #HuntingIsConservation campaign, which has reached more than 30 million people since its launch in January 2016

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


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RMEF Celebrates 33rd Anniversary

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RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is commemorating 33 years of carrying out its conservation mission to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.

“We are deeply indebted to and grateful for men and women who had the foresight, energy and perseverance to establish this organization for the benefit of elk and elk country,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “They sacrificed much for a big game mammal that today is the thriving majestic symbol of our nation’s wild country.”

Founded on May 14, 1984, by four elk hunters in northwest Montana, RMEF began operations in a modest trailer in the middle of a field. At that time, there were approximately 550,000 elk in North America. Today, there are more than one million elk from coast-to-coast.

 

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As of December 31, 12016, RMEF and its partners carried out 10,469 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects that conserved or enhanced 7,111,358 acres. It also opened or secured access to 1,105,667 acres. Additionally, RMEF assisted with successful elk reintroductions in seven states and one Canadian province. 

RMEF now has more than 222,000 thousand members and more than 500 chapters across the United States.

“We appreciate our volunteers, members and partners as well as sportsmen and women who support the RMEF. It is because of them that we are able to accelerate our mission across elk country,” added Allen.

http://tunein.com/embed/player/p963773/?autoplay=true

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.

New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is pleased to announce Philip Barrett as the new chairman of its Board of Directors. An avid hunter, RMEF life member and conservationist, Barrett is also vice president of finance for Chick-fil-A.

“I am very honored to be asked to serve RMEF in this capacity,” said Barrett. “It will be a joy to continue to work with such an outstanding group of board members and staff. They all have great passion for our mission and a strong willingness to be a part of the continued growth of the foundation.”

Barrett succeeds Chuck Roady as the 18th chairman to lead RMEF. The new board members are Mark Baker and Lewis Stapley.

 

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Among his goals, Barrett says RMEF will remain relevant and loyal to membership while continuing to protect public lands and hunting’s tradition and heritage. He will also focus on maintaining RMEF’s financial health while putting a high percentage of each dollar toward the organization’s on-the-ground conservation work.

“Philip brings significant business and life experience to our board,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “He is also a deep believer in furthering our conservation mission.”

Barrett began his career at Chick-fil-A as a corporate accounting manager in 1980. He has been responsible for all financial aspects of the company. Barrett also serves as chairman of the board of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ Outdoor Ministry and as a national board member for the Catch-A-Dream Foundation.

“RMEF is among the very best of conservation organizations. Our past accomplishments in the areas of land protection and elk reintroductions are well-known but we continue to have a great opportunity and responsibility to help shape the future of our public lands and wildlife management strategies in our great country,” added Barrett.

He and wife Peggy have two children and five grandchildren.

New RMEF board member bios:

Mark Baker
• Helena, Montana
• Managing Partner ABS Legal, PLLC
• Special Counsel to Mercury public strategy firm
• Past counsel/staff director for U.S. Senator Conrad Burns
• RMEF life member

Lewis Stapley
• Schroon Lake, New York
• Owner/operator Drake Lumber Corporation (1989-2003)
• Founded first volunteer emergency ambulance service in Schroon Lake, NY
• RMEF life member, sponsor member, Habitat Council & Trails Society
• RMEF Olympic Chapter (NY) co-founder and chairman & member of the New York State Leadership Team

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.