Mentored Youth Turkey Hunts Offered

Turkey hunting is an excellent place to get youngsters started. That’s why it’s always great to see Colorado Parks and Wildlife offering mentored hunts. Look for similar events in your state. ~Mia

CPW offers four young novices a mentored, private land turkey hunt near Craig

CPW_SiteLogoCRAIG, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is encouraging young, aspiring hunters to apply for the second of two mentored, private land turkey hunts in the Northwest Region this spring. The 3rd Annual Douglas Mountain Spring Turkey Hunt will take place May 7-8 on private land west of Craig, and is open to four, true novices that have a desire to hunt but do not know someone that can show them how.

As part of Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Hunter Outreach Program, this private land hunt – along with the opportunity near Meeker – is made possible due to a strong partnership between local landowners and Colorado Parks and Wildlife, and the healthy turkey populations in the area.Colorado-Parks-and-wildlife-youth-turkey-hunting

“We are very grateful to local landowners that see the value in donating access to their private lands and helping CPW provide young kids with a fantastic learning experience,” said District Wildlife Manager and hunt organizer Mike Swaro. “I’m happy to say that we have more landowners than ever participating in this event. Also, we took two kids last year but this year we are able to provide more opportunity because our turkey populations are doing very well.”

Swaro adds that the Douglas Mountain Spring Turkey Hunt is open to all youths under the age of 18 that possess a Hunter Education card; however, applicants that have no hunting experience and come from non-hunting families will have priority.


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“One of the most important things a young hunter needs to begin a lifelong love of the outdoors and hunting is a good mentor, and that’s what we provide through our Hunter Outreach Program,” said Swaro.  “We ask everyone to keep in mind that the goal of the program is education for beginners, not just a chance to hunt on private property.”

Applicants must mail their entry by April 8, 2016 to:

DWM Mike Swaro
815 Ashley Rd
Craig, CO 81625

The application packet should include:

  • The youth’s name, address and Hunter Education card number
  • A parent or guardian’s contact information, including an email address and phone number
  • An essay of 500 words or less, handwritten by the youth and in their own words, about why he or she should be selected
The applicant’s lack of experience, reasons that have kept them from participating in a hunt and the desire to learn are suggested topics for the required essay.

The four hunters will be selected based upon the contents of the essay and will be notified by CPW on or before April 13, 2016.

All participants selected for this hunt will be required to attend a pre-hunt orientation at Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s warehouse in Craig, Friday, May 6, from 3 – 5 p.m., accompanied by a parent, guardian or mentor.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife will provide shotguns, ammunition, blinds and calls. Successful applicants must provide their own camouflage clothing, lodging and food.

For more information, call the CPW office in Meeker at 970-878-6090.

For more information about turkey hunting, visitwww.cpw.state.co.us/thingstodo/Pages/Turkey.aspx

To learn more about Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Hunter Outreach Program, go towww.cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/HunterOutreach.aspx

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Get Youth Outdoors Movement – NWTF

“There are so many distractions in our world today stealing the attention of our youth, but we [the NWTF] have a duty to our communities to provide options to help get kids outdoors,” said George Thornton, NWTF CEO. “We are proud to play a key role in promoting outdoor activities to our youth as they are the generation that we will rely on to help save the future of our wildlife and habitat.

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YOUTH ENCOURAGED TO APPLY FOR MENTORED TURKEY HUNT (Colorado)

All novice youth hunters are encouraged to apply; however, those that have no prior hunting experience, have special family circumstances or health conditions that limit their opportunity to participate in the sport of hunting will be given priority over experienced young hunters that come from hunting families.

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Mia & LG on youth turkey hunting

Women's Outdoor NewsMia & the Little Gal on youth turkey hunting with an outfitter

Seven questions to ask an outfitter when taking a youth hunter on a guided turkey hunt 

Turkey hunting in the spring is one of the most exciting times to introduce your little guy or gal to the sport. It’s always exciting to chase down the keen birds, and also, to call them in. To increase the odds of bagging a bird for your youngster, you may want to book a guided hunt with an outfitter who offers turkey hunting.

With any guided hunt, you need to ask specific questions before you go. This becomes even more important when you are bringing a youth hunter along. You want to make sure your child experiences quality time and wants to hunt again.

It is best to get your questions answered in person, or at least over the phone, by the outfitter. This will allow you to get a good feel fo… (Click HERE to read more)

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Youth Turkey Hunts – Exciting Firsts!

Spring turkey hunt memories from the field:

LG with her first bird_turkey huntingI love sharing the outdoor passion, hunting, fishing, hiking, exploring, with the kids. It is so rewarding to hear them talking and telling their stories. They are our future. It is great when I see a kid that has respect for Mother Nature and even better when they become connected to it through their experiences.

In Colorado, the kids can hunt as long as they are able to pass the hunter’s safety course. They cannot, however, hunt big game until they are 12 years old. The kids get to hunt small game, coyotes, prairie dogs, grouse, and of course turkey. We found a greater love for turkey hunting when we approached the challenge of taking the kids.

We have a friend with a daughter the age of ours and combined our efforts with him to take the two girls hunting. One spring morning we took the two on their first turkey hunt. The two girls were excited, and I am certain one was a little nervous. We rode up a valley on horseback and spotted fresh turkey droppings. Turkey were definitely in the area. Our friend let out a call to try to get a bird to talk. Nothing. We continued along up a hillside and to another draw. There we found fresh tracks in the dust on a slope. Another call was let out, immediately followed by an answer!

Up above us on the ridge of a hill, we heard a tom gobble. The girls’ eyes sparked, and I know their hearts jumped with anticipation. We made a plan to get in closer to that gobbler.

CLICK TO SHOP HUNTING DECOYS

Another call was chirped before we headed out. This time two gobblers answered. Perfect! Up the draw we went.

We rode a short way and found a spot below the ridge on which we had heard the toms. A draw came down off that hill and opened up into a meadow. Our friend chirped on his call. We heard the gobbles again. We decided this would be a suitable spot for setting up two 10-year-old girls to get their birds. We would have to call the toms down that draw and into the clearing so the girls could have a close enough shot.

We set the girls up under some oak brush and behind some downfall. It sufficed as a perfect natural blind and rest for their shotguns. The girls sat side by side and then decided who would shoot first. The Little Gal was nervous, so it was agreed that our friend’s daughter would shoot first. The Little Gal would get second shot if both toms happened to come within range.

Our friend and I sat a little further behind, but still within eyeshot, to call. A little purr and then some clucking. We heard the gobbles off in the distance, but they were getting closer. Then we sat silent and waited. After several moments, we called again. The gobbles were closer yet.

They were coming!

The girls were so excited that they were frozen with excitement. We sat behind and continued to call giving the toms time to come in. We heard one off toward the right, and seconds later one straight ahead. Closer and closer they came. Slow but steady. The girls had their guns up on the rest. Hank told them to be ready. (Later he told us they were so excited they held their breaths.)

Suddenly a tom appeared out in the middle of the draw. He was in full strut, spinning and turning. Then he drummed. Moving toward the girls suddenly. Then we heard a gasp as our friend’s daughter lost her breath in awe and excitement. The tom heard the sound and turned immediately, running for the brush. The excited girl took her shot. Dust flew, but the tom was already out of range.

We heard all sorts of screaming and excitement going on. The girls laid down their guns and were running and jumping around. They could not believe they had gotten to see a tom, much less a tom strutting toward them.

In the end, there was no bird to put in the satchel that day, but there was a lot of excitement, learning and fun had by all.There’s nothing like taking a kid for their first hunt. The moments in the field are priceless for sure and some that I wouldn’t trade for anything.

It’s Always An Adventure!


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Predation plus Turkey Hunting – Mia & the Little Gal

A new post is up at the Women’s Outdoor News. Check us out, Mia and the Little Gal. Prepping for turkey hunting.

Mia & the Little Gal: On predation management and tips for turkey hunting

Last year the Little Gal (LG) and I gave you a report called The Little Gal Becomes a Trapper, in which, she decided to do some wildlife management via trapping. Years ago, there were larger flocks of turkeys in the area. Over time they had slowly disappeared. LG spoke with a biologist from the National […]

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Mia & the Little Gal at the Women's Outdoor News


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Counting the days until Turkey Hunting

It is the middle of winter in the Rocky Mountains but we are excited. The Little Gal did some trapping last year (Click here to read about it) and has increased our turkey population exponentially. We are seeing more turkeys than ever so we are excited to take you turkey hunting this spring.


We LOVE to hunt turkeys. Check out some of our personal turkey hunting fun:


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Turkey Hunting – Share the passion | Mia’s Motivations

I am currently preoccupied with life, loss and healing. For now – A repost of a story shared a couple of years ago because Turkey Hunting starts in just 17 days in our neck of the woods.

I love sharing the outdoor passion, hunting, fishing, hiking, exploring, with the kids.  It is so rewarding to hear them talking and telling their stories.  They are our future.  It is great when I see a kid that has a respect for Mother Earth, and even better when they become connected to it through their experiences in it.youth turkey hunt

In Colorado, the kids can hunt as long as they can pass the hunter’s safety course.  They can not however hunt big game until they are 12 years old.  They get to hunt small game, coyotes, prairie dogs, grouse, and of course turkey.  We found a love for turkey hunting when we were approached the challenge of taking the kids.

We have a friend with a daughter the age of ours, and have combined efforts with him to take the two girls hunting together.  We took the Little Gal and her friend on their first turkey hunt one spring morning.  The two girls were excited, and I am pretty sure one was a little nervous.  We rode up a valley on horseback and spotted some fresh turkey droppings.  They were definitely in the area.  Our friend let out a call to try to get a bird to talk.  Nothing. We continued along up a hillside and to another draw.  In the dust of the slope, we found fresh tracks.  Another call was let out, and then an answer!

Up above us on the ridge of a hill we heard a tom gobble.  The girls eyes sparked, and I know their hearts jumped with anticipation.  We made a plan to get in closer to that gobbler.

Before we headed out, another call was chirped, and this time there were two gobblers that answered.  Perfect!  Up the draw we went.

We rode a short ways and found a spot below the ridge on which we had heard the toms. A draw came down off that hill and opened up into a meadow.  Our friend chirped on his call and we heard the gobbles again. We decided this would be the spot to suit setting up two 10-year-old girls to get their birds.  We would have to call them down that draw and into the clearing so they could have a good close shot.

Hank sat with the two girls up close under some oak brush and down fall. It sufficed as a perfect blind and rest for their shot guns.  One girl on either side, they decided who would shoot first.  The Little Gal’s friend was the winner, and the Little Gal would get second shot if both toms happened to get close enough.

Our friend and I sat a little further behind to call.  A little pur and then some chirping.  We heard the gobbles off in the distance but they were getting closer.  Then we sat silent and waited.  After several moments, we called again.  The gobbles were even closer yet.

They were coming!

Hank sat with the girls who could not have been more still if you asked them to.  They were frozen with excitement.  We sat behind and could not see any of the events, but continued to call giving the toms time to come in.  We heard one off toward the right, and later one straight ahead.  Closer and closer, slow but steady.  The girls had their guns up on the rest.  Hank told them to be ready, and they held their breaths.

Suddenly a tom appeared out in the middle of the draw.  He appeared in full strut.  He came forward toward the girls so suddenly.  There was a gasp as the Little Gal’s friend lost her breath in awe and excitement.  The tom heard the sound and turned immediately running for the brush.  The excited little girl shot, but he just wasn’t near enough yet.

That is when our friend and I, from behind the brush heard all sorts of screaming and excitement going on.  We jumped up to see if someone got a bird.  It was the girls running and jumping with excitement.  They could not believe they had gotten to see a tom, much  less a tom strutting toward them.

There was no bird to put in the satchel that day, but there was a lot of excitement, learning and fun had by all. There is nothing like taking a kid for their first hunt. The moments in the field are priceless for sure and some that I wouldn’t trade for anything.

It’s Always An Adventure!


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Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.