State Parks, Hunting and Shooting Planning at Colorado Commission Meeting

Colorado is a fantastic place to enjoy the outdoors, be it hunting, fishing, shooting, or enjoy one of the state parks. There are some big items on the table before the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commision. Learn more about the upcoming meeting.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission to meet September 6 – 7 in Glenwood Springs

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER – The Colorado Parks and Wildlife Commission will discuss allowing leashed dogs on select trails at Cheyenne Mountain State Park, prohibiting fishing at the ponds within the dog off-leash area at Chatfield State Park, restricting watercraft to vessels propelled by hand on the Chatfield State Park ponds (excluding the main reservoir), removing the boating seasonal closure at Jackson Lake State Park, and defining and allowing incidental commercial use at state parks without a cooperative or special use agreement.

The Commission will also consider proposed regulations concerning the fee structure for the recently created Cameo Shooting and Education Complex, proper display of OHV permits, Colorado Springs Urban Deer Management, Northwest Region Fires Update, and the 2020 – 2024 Big Game Season Structure at its September meeting in Glenwood Springs.

The meeting is scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. and adjourn at 5 p.m. on September 6 at Colorado Mountain College’s Morgridge Commons Meeting & Conference Center, 815 Cooper Avenue, in Glenwood Springs.

The September 6 meeting will include a Commission Forum: Envisioning Colorado’s Future State Parks that will be broadcast on Facebook Live from 2 – 5 p.m.

The meeting will reconvene at the same location at 8 a.m. on September 7 and will adjourn at 1 p.m.

Additional agenda items include:

  • Proposed fishing regulations for 2019
  • Continued discussion on application fees, preference points fees, and implementation of the Future Generations Act
  • Harvest limit proposals for the November 2018-March 2019 mountain lion season
  • GOCO Update
  • Financial Update
  • IPAWS Update
  • Colorado Wildlife Habitat Program – Recommended Projects
  • Executive Session

A complete agenda for this meeting can be found on the CPW website.

The commission meets regularly and travels to communities around the state to facilitate public participation. Anyone can listen to commission meetings through the CPW website. This opportunity keeps constituents informed about the development of regulations and how the commission works with Colorado Parks and Wildlife staff to manage the parks, wildlife and outdoor recreation programs administered by the agency. Find out more about the commission on the CPW website.

The next commission meeting will take place November 15 and 16 in Burlington.


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Outdoor-Skills Weekend for Women – Colorado

If you or a lady you know would like to learn a variety of outdoor skills, there is a weekend planned for you in Western Colorado. I volunteer to help with a similar event in my area and I must admit it’s a great place to learn, socialize and get outdoors. Try to sign up for one in your area.

Women only outdoor-skills weekend planned for Western Colorado

Womens-outdoor-clinic-CPW-792ce026-65b6-46d7-952b-6c7af213504dMONTROSE, Colo. – Women who want to gain valuable outdoor skills, learn about wildlife and receive an introduction to hunting and fishing are invited to attend a “Cast and Blast” weekend workshop, July 13-15, sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

The event is limited to 15-20 women and those interested must submit an application.

At the event, women will learn the basics of fly fishing, shotgun shooting, archery, wildlife watching and camping. Participants will also learn about the basics of wildlife management.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife will supply all sporting equipment — shotguns, ammunition, bows and arrows, and fly rods and tackle. Those who have a 20-gauge shotgun, fishing or archery gear can bring their own.

“This program is designed for women and provides a very supportive atmosphere for those who want to learn about fishing, hunting and wildlife,” said Kelly Crane, district wildlife manager in Ouray. “We especially invite women who have little or no experience to join us.”

Participants must have a current Colorado fishing license.

The event will be held at the Jim Olterman/Lone Cone State Wildlife Area, located about 25 miles south of Norwood. Participants will need to bring their own camping gear; they can camp in their own tents or sleep in a cabin. All food will be provided. Those with dietary restrictions, however, should bring their own supplies. A $40 deposit will be required from those chosen to participate.

To obtain an application for the workshop, please contact Dawn Bresett at 970-252-6000, or via email at dawn.bresett@state.co.us.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Why You Shouldn’t Wait to Apply for Hunting Licenses

I’m sitting in the Hunter Ed classroom waiting for the students to arrive and I thought I’d better tell you why you shouldn’t wait to get your Colorado hunting applications in.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife implemented their new licensing system a few weeks ago and ever since they’ve been encouraging hunters and angels to get into the system, update their profiles, and buy their licenses a.s.a.p.. Since I sit on the Colorado Sportsman’s Roundtable, attend CPW public meetings, teach hunter ed, and mentor others, I did just that. I got on the website right away. I updated my profile. I made sure my preference points were still listed as they should be, and then I waited for the day license sales opened.

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Do not wait until the last minute; apply today for your Colorado limited licenses.

I immediately bought and applied for all my licenses. I had no problem, and heck it’s much less expensive than it used to be. (Now — What to do with all that extra dinero? <winking of course>) I ran into no hic-ups and had zero problems. I even have my small game hunting and fishing combo license with me as I type. Yep! It’s already here.

That leads me to a friend and her husband. She asked that I stop by and help her navigate the system as she’s a bit wary and they’re actually some of the few who, until now, has always applied using the paper mail-in applications for her hunting licenses. I agreed to help and met her after church.

We sat down to purchase and apply for her husband’s tags. Logged in. Applied. Purchased. Done. The process went as smooth as silk.

Next, my friend logged in to her portal and we began, with her information verification screen. Everything looked good. She clicked the save button only to be stopped by the system, which displayed an error message something like “the name cannot be found in the system.” She logged out and then in. The same error message popped up. She pulled out her old hunting license to see if she used to have her maiden name on them. Nope. The name on the screen read exactly the same as the old hunting license, but the system wouldn’t allow her to proceed to even look at a species or tag for which to apply.

The moral of my story is if you have a problem similar to my friend’s you may not have time to go to the CPW office and get it taken care of. Get online NOW and buy or apply! Learn more below.

CPW urges hunters, begin applying online for a limited license today, do not wait until the last minute

DENVER – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is urging hunters planning to apply for a limited hunting license to begin the process as soon as possible. The agency says waiting until just before the application deadline, midnight, April 3, could pose challenges for hunters due to staff availability and support. Getting in early will ensure successfully completing and submitting an application.

This year, CPW launched a new, integrated online purchasing system designed to streamline the limited license application process. Agency officials say so far the majority of transactions have been successful; however, as is the case with the rollout of any new computerized system, there are always challenges.

“As advanced as our new system is, and regardless of how well it has worked so far, there is no system in existence that will work perfectly out of the box,” said Cory Chick, License Services Manager. “Especially this first year, we urge hunters to do their part by logging on today and making sure any holdups are addressed right now, not at the last minute.”

One recommendation CPW officials have for hunters is to be sure and read all directions on the website before applying. There are video tutorials and step by step guides for setting up accounts.

“One of the primary challenges customers are facing is when they create a new profile rather than looking up their CID number.” said Bradley Gabrielski, CPW Call Center Coordinator. “The information to make the online application process work is there, but it is critical that people take the time to read it before they start.”

Gabrielski says hunters with questions, or those that may not have experience with computers, have several options to get help with their application. They can come into one of CPW’s offices located across the state, contact the CPW Call Center at 1-303-297-1192 or by calling the agency’s 24-hour hotline at 1-800-244-5613.

Agency staff are asking for customers to be patient when calling into an office, the CPW Call Center or the Aspira Call Center. Call volume is extremely high this time of year which is also why it is important to start the application process earlier rather than later.

“We cannot stress enough that waiting until the last minute to apply is not recommended,” said Chick. “Begin your application today.”

For more information, call your local CPW office, or you can go to the CPW website for detailed information.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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Deadline Approaching Take Survey for Big-Game Management Plans | Colorado

Colorado Parks and Wildlife is developing new management plans for big game in the North Fork and Gunnison areas and invites hunters and the general public to take on-line surveys that will help wildlife managers writing the plans.

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Buy Your Colorado OTC Hunting Licenses

I’m not sure about you, but I’m getting excited about hunting season. While the draw deadline for Colorado’s limited hunting licenses was way back in April, the results came out and some of us didn’t draw everything we’d applied for. If you’re a hunter, I’m sure you already know this is typical. It’s how it goes and is part of the process. 

Tags are limited based on the need to manage wildlife populations and the number of hunters in the woods at any given time. That being said, in our state, there are units which offer Over the Counter Tags (OTC) for some seasons and species. These tags go on sale August 25th this year. If you didn’t draw your first choice(s), you can buy an OTC tag and still have the opportunity to put some meat in the freezer. Learn more below.

Start of ‘over-the-counter’ and ‘leftover’ hunting license sales brings excitement

CPW_SiteLogoCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Staff at Colorado Parks and Wildlife offices statewide are bracing for two of the biggest days of the year: “OTC” day on July 25 and “leftover” day on Aug. 1.

CPW staff say OTC day – the first day hunting licenses can be bought on an “over-the-counter” basis – is just a warm-up for leftover day when lines form days in advance, resembling crowds awaiting the opening of a Hollywood blockbuster or to buy the newest smartphone gadget. People camp out at CPW offices to ensure they get first shot at prime hunting licenses leftover from the draw.

The excitement over the start of hunting season begins on OTC day. Many of the 500,000 or so who hunt in Colorado request licenses through a draw system. The draw is the only way to buy mule deer licenses. And it’s also a way to get bear, elk, whitetail deer and pronghorn licenses. Typically there is far more demand than available licenses.

Others, however, simply buy their elk, bear, whitetail deer and pronghorn licenses over-the-counter at CPW’s 18 offices or at other retail outlets. And it is usually a busy day.

Hunting-license-sales-colorado-cc241a51-f67c-4c89-9584-860fa2db7ea6Various CPW offices handle the welcome crush of business in different ways. The CPW office in Salida makes it a party, cooking breakfast burritos on site and providing coffee to the hunters.

“We have done this for the past 14 years and is always well-received by the hunters,” said Jim Aragon, area wildlife manager in Salida. “I think some people really don’t care if they get the license they were looking for as long as the burritos are there.”

Visitors to the CPW offices in Lamar and Pueblo will find doughnuts and coffee or water.

In the Southeast Region office in Colorado Springs, the staff is more focused on serving customers as quickly as possible, given the high volume of traffic expected that morning.

“Bear licenses are the biggest attraction on OTC day,” said Michelle Mulrony, lead customer service representative in the Southeast Region offices. “People are very excited about the start of the hunting season. They want their license right away.”

It’s fun, she said, and the fun is only just getting started. Wait until leftover day hits Aug. 1.

“Leftover day is huge,” Mulrony said. “We had people 50 deep last year waiting for leftover day.”

The line for leftover licenses will form at the glass classroom entrance doors on the east side of the building. In recent years, tents have circled the Southeast Region building at 4255 Sinton Road in Colorado Springs. Portable restrooms were brought in to accommodate the campers.

The crowds come because leftover day is a chance to buy tags that were previously offered during the draw and often represent prime hunting opportunities.

“During the draw process, you can only take one tag per species,” Mulrony said. “Leftover day is the only way to get another tag from the same species.”

There is a lot of behind-the-scenes work to prepare for leftover day. Mulrony will convert the CPW’s Hunters Education classroom into a war room to handle the crush.

“It’s organized chaos,” she said, describing how 30 CPW staff members – or nearly everyone in the Southeast Region office – will pitch in to help.

She asks hunters to come prepared. At check-in, they will be asked to fill out a sheet indicating what they want to buy, what licenses they hold, whether they’ve completed a hunter’s education course and other questions. The hunters will be processed by CPW staff who will do computer searches to check for conflicts, such as whether their licenses are suspended.

“Last year, we sold 297 licenses on leftover day,” she said.

Follow this link to CPW’s OTC and Leftover license page for more details.

And here is a list of things to remember:

Be Prepared

Those who plan to purchase leftover licenses at license agents or CPW offices should be prepared before they arrive. This will help the process run as efficiently as possible.

If you are planning on purchasing a license, be sure to have the following:

  • Your driver’s license/state issued identification card,
  • Proof of hunter education: hunter education card or a Colorado hunting license with verified hunter education,
  • Your social security number (anyone 12 years of age and older are required to give their social security number, if not already on file),
  • Your customer identification number (CID), if you have previously purchased a license in Colorado,
  • Proof of residency, if you are planning to purchase a resident license,
  • A prioritized list of hunt codes for licenses you are interested in.

If purchasing a license for someone else (can only be done IN PERSON), the buyer must bring the following for the hunter:

  • A clear copy of both sides of their driver’s license/state issued identification card,
  • A clear copy of both sides of t heir hunter education card or a previous Colorado hunting license with verified hunter education,
  • Their social security number (anyone 12 years of age and older are required to give their social security number, if not already on file),
  • Their customer identification number (CID), if they have previously purchased a license in Colorado,
  • A prioritized list of hunt codes they are interested in.

IMPORTANT: One cannot buy a license for someone else over the phone. The option to buy for someone else only works in person.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

Big-Game Allocations for Colorado’s Gunnison Basin

Big game licensing open house in Gunnison, March 30

CPW_SiteLogoGUNNISON, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife will present the proposed 2017 big-game license allocations for the Gunnison Basin at an open house, 4:30-7 p.m., March 30, at the Fred Field Center at the Gunnison County Fairgrounds in Gunnison.

CPW biologists and district wildlife managers will be on hand to talk about the status of deer, elk, bears, pronghorn and moose in Game Management Units 54, 55, 551, 66 and 67. Agency staff will also explain CPW’s recommendations for license availability for deer and elk seasons and take comments from the public.

Terrestrial Biologist Kevin Blecha will give an overview presentation, one to start the meeting and another at 6 p.m.

CLICK TO SHOP

CPW will also present the latest information on winter deer-survival monitoring.

CPW staff will also be available to answer questions about applying for big game licenses for those who need assistance.

For more information, call 970-641-7060.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Apply for Colorado Big Game Licenses by April 4th

Big Game DeadlineThe April 4th deadline to apply for a big-game license is fast approaching. And if you plan to hunt big game in Colorado this fall, now’s the time to submit your application. The 2017 Colorado Big Game Brochure includes everything you need to know to help you get ready for the upcoming big-game seasons.

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Apply Online

Buy Your 2017 Fishing License

Rainbow-trout-CPW-3e46e304-481d-434b-adec-8877d89bdcaeWhile you’re applying for your big-game license, remember to add on your fishing license. An annual license is good starting April 1, 2017 through March 31, 2018. You can purchase a license online at CPW’s secure license application portal or by phone at 1-800-244-5613 . Get tips and stay up to date on Colorado fishing regulations by reading the 2017 Colorado Fishing Brochure.

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Hunters – Be Extra careful during rifle season

CPW_SiteLogoDURANGO, Colo. – As the big game hunting season continues Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds hunters to be careful in all aspects of their hunting adventures. While few hunters are injured from firearm accidents, other activities in the field can cause problems.

Recently, a hunter in the Gunnison area died from carbon monoxide poisoning after going to sleep with gas lanterns burning in his tent. The man only brought blankets which were not adequate for cold nights in the high country. A report on the incident stated that he used the lanterns in an attempt to stay warm.


“Spend more time with your family and friends, whether it be outside, hunting, at the shooting range or around the table, savoring all life has to offer.” MM 

If a heater, stove or lantern that burns gas or oil is being used in an enclosed space such as a tent or a camper, adequate ventilation is needed to assure carbon monoxide is expelled and that clean air circulates through.

Hunters need to use high-quality sleeping bags that are rated for low temperatures and also pads that provide extra insulation and keep the bottom of the bag off the ground.

hunt-colorado-safely-cpw-123e9aa7-72b1-4b20-8923-518630efb5ab
Colorado’s big-game rifle seasons start Oct. 15 and continue through Nov. 20. Colorado Parks and Wildlife urges hunters to be careful in the field.

Hunters should always be prepared to spend the night outside in case bad weather moves in or they become lost. In a pack, hunters should carry matches, a compass or GPS unit, flashlight, extra batteries, a space blanket, signaling device, rain gear, and a hat and gloves.

Emergency-room doctors also report other health and injury issues during the hunting seasons.

It’s best to be in good shape before hunting in Colorado. Those coming from lower altitudes should also take at least one day to acclimatize by making some short hikes around camp.

Every year a number of hunters go to hospitals because of cardiac problems. Many of those hunters come from lower altitudes and experience serious heart problems when they go into the high country. Hunters need to evaluate their health before they venture to high altitude to engage in strenuous activity.

Doctors also say that some hunters injure themselves while handling arrows, knives, axes and other tools in camp or in the field.

Wildlife officials advise hunters to cut slowly while field-dressing big game. Knives and saws must be sharp and they must be handled deliberately and carefully, especially in difficult conditions in the forest, such as on a mountainside, in low-light or if you’re wearing gloves. Hunters who are not familiar with field-dressing can view videos to learn how. A video is available on the CPW web site athttp://cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/HuntVideos.aspx; many videos also are available on YouTube.

More and more hunters in Colorado are now hunting from tree stands. It’s recommended that hunters assemble the stand at home and practice climbing in and out of it before going into the field.


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Finally, hunters are always urged to be extra careful while handling their rifles. CPW reminds hunters that a majority of firearm mishaps happen in and around vehicles while guns are being loaded and unloaded. It is unlawful to carry a loaded firearm in a vehicle in Colorado.

Colorado’s big-game rifle seasons start Oct. 15 and continue through Nov. 20.

For more hunting and survival tips, check out these articles on the CPW web site:
http://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/News-Release-Details.aspx?NewsID=5858.

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Developed Predator Management Plan to Save Mule Deer

CPW’s Piceance Basin Predator Management Plan topic of public meeting, Aug.16

CPW_SiteLogoGRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – Due to a variety of factors, including habitat fragmentation, disease, development, increased outdoor recreation and predation, mule deer populations remain below objective in parts of Colorado, primarily in the state’s largest mule deer herds in the Piceance Basin. To reverse the downward trend, Colorado Parks and Wildlife managers continue to implement the agency’s West Slope Mule Deer Strategy, approved by the CPW Commission in 2015.

CPW developed the strategy after an extensive, statewide public outreach effortthroughout 2014, gathering input from sportsmen and interested members of the public concerned about declining mule deer populations in Colorado and across the Western United States.

 

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One component of the strategy is predator control in areas where where mule deer populations remain below objective. Beginning in 2017, CPW researcher Chuck Andersonwill begin a three-year study to monitor the results of predator control on the Roan Plateau.

 

To learn details about the project, the public is invited to a discussion with CPW officials at the Garfield County Fairgrounds, South Hall, Tuesday, Aug. 16 at 6 p.m.

“The study will monitor if mule deer fawn survival responds positively to control of lions and bears in a relatively small area on the Roan Plateau,” said Anderson.

According to Anderson, the predator control study will take place in May and June, just before and during the fawn birthing period. He adds that all predators taken will be utilized to the fullest, including distribution of meat to people that need it, and CPW will use carcasses for education.

“We remain well below where we would like to be in terms of overall mule deer numbers,” said Northwest Regional Manager Ron Velarde. “There is no one reason and no ‘silver bullet’ solution to this problem, but many in the public identified predator management as one factor that could yield positive results, and we agree.”

Velarde adds that Anderson’s research will help guide the agency’s future management efforts in other areas of the state where predation may be impacting mule deer populations.

CPW’s population objective for mule deer is approximately 560,000 statewide; however, the latest estimate puts the statewide population at just under 450,000. The most significant decline has occurred in the Piceance Basin; however, CPW managers note that some herds, including those in the Middle Park region, remain well above objective.

For more information about CPW’s mammal research, go towww.cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/ResearchMammals.aspx

For more information about Colorado’s Mule Deer Strategy, go towww.cpw.state.co.us/learn/Pages/CO-WestSlopeMuleDeerStrategySummit.aspx

Who: Colorado Parks and Wildlife
What: Piceance Basin Predator Management Plan – Public Meeting
When: Tuesday, Aug. 16, 6 p.m.
Where: Garfield County Fairgrounds – South Event Hall

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Colorado Hunting and Fishing License Fees – Public Invited to Roundtable

 


Hunters and anglers invited to Sportsmen’s Roundtable caucus July 13 in Grand Junction, resident license fees on the agenda

CPW_SiteLogoGRAND JUNCTION, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife urges hunters and anglers, or anyone who wants their voice heard regarding wildlife issues, to attend the next NW Region Sportsmen’s Roundtable caucus in Grand Junction, Wednesday, July 13, at Colorado Mesa University, Meyer Ballroom in the University Center, 1455 North 12th Street.

Several important topics are on the agenda, including the election of two regional representatives and a presentation by CPW’s Policy and Planning section seeking sportsmen’s input on funding the future of wildlife management and conservation in Colorado.

CPW anticipates budget shortfalls which could be offset by increasing resident license fees. The last increase occurred in 2005 and since 2009, CPW has cut or defunded 50 positions and cut $40 million from its operating budget. Wildlife managers caution that additional cuts are inevitable without an increase in revenue.


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“Colorado’s wildlife faces more pressure now than ever before, including a growing human population, increasingly fragmented habitat and less young people involved in hunting,” said NW Regional Manager Ron Velarde. “We have already undergone significant belt-tightening and now we need to find effective ways to increase revenue. We need to have this important discussion with hunters and anglers.”

Velarde adds that CPW’s wildlife management programs are funded by user fees, generated primarily by the sale of hunting and fishing licenses. Unlike other state agencies, CPW does not receive general fund revenue.

Currently, a limited elk license for resident adults costs $46. Resident youths pay $10.75 for limited deer, elk and pronghorn licenses. Limited deer license and pronghorn licenses are $31 for resident adults.

“Colorado is clearly one of the premier big game hunting areas in the country and that is a testament to the hard work and dedication of the state’s wildlife managers,” adds Velarde. “When you compare our resident license fees to states that do not provide the same quality experience found here, the need for an increase becomes very evident. We are prepared to make the case.”


Get outside. Explore, learn, hunt, fish, shoot, connect with nature.


The Roundtable consists of four appointed members and two elected members from each region. Twice each year, the Statewide Sportsmen’s Roundtable meets with the CPW Director and other members of CPW’s leadership for detailed discussions about a variety of wildlife management challenges.

Anyone interested in one of two NW Region elected positions are encouraged to attend the meeting. The election will be held the same evening with votes cast by attendees. Elected members can serve two-year terms and are expected to organize regional caucus meetings and be available to constituents, serving as their representatives for regional concerns during the statewide meetings.

  • Who: Sportsmen’s Roundtable Caucus
  • What: Regular caucus meeting and election
  • When: Wednesday, July 13, 6 p.m.
  • Where: Colorado Mesa University,  Meyer Ballroom, located in the University Center, 1455 North 12th Street. Call 970-248-1758 for additional info

For more information about the Sportsmen’s Roundtable, visit www.cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/Roundtable.aspx

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.



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