Adrenaline and Colorado Archery Elk Hunting

Second in a three-part series, this week Mia and Lea share the story you all have been waiting for — the big event of Mia taking down a huge archery bull. She shares the lead up to the shot and all the small details from blood trailing to the ups and downs of emotions on that big day. It’s one story you won’t want to miss.

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The dynamic mother/daughter duo share their hunting, shooting, and outdoor adventures. You’ll find tips, tricks, lessons, and tales from the trail. Mia is a mom, hunting guide, writer, and vlogger who lives on a ranch in Colorado. Her daughter, Lea, also a guide, is a passionate young hunter who’s in the second year of her college journey. TUNE IN because you never know what obstacles and inspiration they’ll encounter as they head outside for new adventures.

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Elk Hunting Adventures, Tips and Tactics |050 MAC Outdoors Podcast

Elk-Hunting-Adventures-Tips-Tactics-MAC-Outdoors-PodcastJoin Mia and Lea as they bring you the much-anticipated story of an elk hunting adventure of a lifetime. In a series of episodes, the two will share the stories of the elk, the terrain, the emotion, and the gear that helped Mia to successfully harvest a beautiful DIY public land, wilderness bull-elk during Colorado’s archery season.

In this first episode, Mia tells us about the elk she encountered and some of the challenges she faced before tagging her bull. Listen up because she’s also sharing some crazy stories that lead up to the big day.

Important links for today’s show:

Show’s Social Outlets:

MAC Outdoors Instagram
MAC Outdoors YouTube
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MAC Outdoors Twitter

Legit Outdoors YouTube
Lea’s Facebook Page
Lea’s Twitter

Mia Anstine YouTube
Mia’s Facebook Page
Mia’s Twitter

MAC Outdoors Podcast:

The dynamic mother/daughter duo share their hunting, shooting, and outdoor adventures. You’ll find tips, tricks, lessons, and tales from the trail. Mia is a mom, hunting guide, writer, and vlogger who lives on a ranch in Colorado. Her daughter, Lea, also a guide, is a passionate young hunter who’s in the first year of her college journey. TUNE IN because you never know what obstacles and inspiration they’ll encounter as they head outside for new adventures.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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Archery Prep & After Harvest Success | 045 MAC Outdoors

045 MAC PodcastThis week Mia and Lea talk about the best ways to get in shape for your next archery hunt. They share ways to better your shooting and prepare your muscles for the journey. They also share ways to be successful after you were successful; caring for your meat. You’ll hear stories about their favorite game meats and how you can make yours taste even better by avoiding the “gamey” taste.

You need to hear this one!

Important links for today’s show:

Show’s Social Outlets:

MAC Outdoors Instagram
MAC Outdoors YouTube
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MAC Outdoors Twitter

Legit Outdoors YouTube
Lea’s Facebook Page
Lea’s Twitter

Mia Anstine YouTube
Mia’s Facebook Page
Mia’s Twitter

MAC Outdoors Podcast:

The dynamic mother/daughter duo share their hunting, shooting, and outdoor adventures. You’ll find tips, tricks, lessons, and tales from the trail. Mia is a mom, hunting guide, writer, and vlogger who lives on a ranch in Colorado. Her daughter, Lea, also a guide, is a passionate young hunter who’s in the first year of her college journey. TUNE IN because you never know what obstacles and inspiration they’ll encounter as they head outside for new adventures.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine. This article may include affiliate links.

045 MAC Outdoors

NEW Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation President and CEO Announced

RMEF Announces New President and CEO

RMEF logo high resolution

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation Board of Directors this week announced Kyle Weaver as the new President and CEO, effective June 30, 2018.

“It is a tremendous honor to serve as the leader of the most respected wildlife conservation organization in the country, one that does so much for elk, elk habitat and America’s hunting tradition,” said Weaver. “Moving forward, as a team, we will elevate the delivery of RMEF’s mission, including our lands and access work as well as advocating for our hunting heritage.”

Weaver comes to RMEF from a long and successful career with the National Rifle Association, where he rose from an entry level position to ultimately serve as an NRA Officer and Executive Director of General Operations. His oversight included educational, safety and training programs, grassroots fundraising, as well as hunting and conservation programs. He brings extensive experience with board relations, volunteer management and fiscal responsibility and oversight, along with program building and implementation.

“My entire career has been dedicated to protecting, promoting and supporting our rights in the outdoors as hunters and conservationists. I am excited and welcome this opportunity. I look forward to using my full energy to serve our donors, members, volunteers, partners and sportsmen and women everywhere in furthering RMEF’s conservation mission,” added Weaver.

“We are excited to have Kyle join us and look forward to his leadership as we build on the success of RMEF,” said Philip Barrett, chairman of the RMEF Board of Directors. “We want to thank DBA Executive Search & Recruitment for leading this extensive nationwide search process that yielded an incredible field of candidates.”

Larry Potterfield, a long-time friend of Kyle, lifelong hunter, author, decorated business leader and founder and CEO of Midway USA, added, “The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation plays a critical role in the conservation of one of America’s great wildlife resources. Its long-term success is critical for the preservation of the species and the rights of hunters. Kyle Weaver is the perfect choice to lead this great organization into the future.”

A passionate and avid hunter, Weaver has supported RMEF for well over a decade and is a life member.

Currently, the RMEF president and CEO position is held by Nancy Holland, who stepped into the role in February from her board position to facilitate the transition to the new leadership.

“I am excited for Kyle and RMEF, he brings a strong business acumen and a commitment to conservation. A powerful combination to move RMEF forward and further establish its leadership role in the conservation community,” said Holland. Upon completion of this transition, Nancy will return to her role on RMEF’s Board of Directors.

Kyle is a graduate of Longwood University in Virginia, where he attended on a collegiate baseball scholarship. Weaver is a founding board member and current Chairman of the Fathers in the Field mentoring ministry.

He, wife Ashley and their family will be relocating to Missoula.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:

Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 227,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.3 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at rmef.org, elknetwork.com or 800-CALL ELK.


 

An Impactful Elk Hunt — #MeandMyHunt

New Mexico Bull Elk Hunt

The part about hunting that non-hunters may not understand is that it isn’t about killing. It’s about life. It’s about sustenance. It’s about family. It’s about conservation of all things, including wildlife and human beings.

I have so many favorite hunts that I cannot remember which one I would list at the top. They are all grand in their own unique ways. When I’m called to declare one that is impactful or that made a difference in my life, I scan through the decades of files. My mind lands on one in particular. It’s not a memory of me killing a 6×6 Colorado bull elk or a big typical muley.

New Mexico Bull Elk Hunt

While it’s difficult to declare just one hunt as the one that made a difference in my life, there is one from my childhood that I remember with adoration, and it seated the knowledge I knew within. The knowledge we get from our ancestors. The wisdom from generations before.

You see, as a child, my dad moved us to a small rural town in Southwest Colorado. The populations had to have been less than a couple thousand. Mom worked summers for the U.S. Forest Service, and Dad’s work in construction seemed a bit seasonal as well.

Those were hard times financially, but that’s when I learned the most about life. Mom sewed clothes, crocheted afghans, and grew a garden. We had chickens, goats, and other small livestock, which the family would butcher for food, but the real celebrations were when dad would bring home a deer or elk.

The family would dress and process the wild game together. We all put the labor in to clean, cure, and then process the meat to put in the freezer for the long, cold winter months. There’s some sort of satisfaction that goes into that work, and then enjoying a steak in the middle of a snowed in February night.

That’s not the hunt though. That’s a way of life; a laborious way of life I continually appreciate.

Many years my dad’s cousins and friends would come to hunt the elk of Colorado. Many years we would have fun enjoying their company as they camped out in our yard, or on the floor of the main house. No matter the time of year, I remember dad building a campfire out back where we’d all circle around. They’d tell stories of the trials, tribulations, and successes of the hunts. Every year hunting season was a joy for all of us. Not always, but many years the season would close, and they would head home with no animal on which to put their hunting tags.

One of dad’s friends, who he’d met in kindergarten and I call my uncle, came year after year. He, his brother and his friends hunted hard. Sometimes one in their group would successfully take down an elk. They too shared the campfire stories, and one time he brought his son. My brother and I played in the hills while the adults visited. The next day he was blessed to tag along when one in his dad’s group got a nice 4×4 bull elk.

Year after year my uncle returned. While he’d taken cow elk (a female), he’d never taken a bull. He was determined to successfully tag one and continually worked toward the dream. As the years advanced, he gained a bit of weight, and his health deteriorated a bit, but it didn’t deter him from his quest.

One year he showed up, and his breathing was short. The doctor had put him on medication and suggested a healthy, low-fat diet. That year he couldn’t make the hikes up the steep San Juan Mountains. His brother, my dad, and their friend headed up the first short hill. Dad came back and asked if I was going to come. I declined and said I’d stay behind as well. I knew my uncle was feeling down. He still dreamed of tagging a bull and hoped his health would be better next year so he could get up there and go after them.

He and I sat on the tailgate of his pick up truck, at the bottom of a mountain draw, drinking coffee, warming our hands on the cups that chilly October morning, and watching the sun come up. Oh my, how one can never tire of the majesty of a morning sunrise over the Rockies! As the shadows came, the sun glistened, and we sat there, the coyotes’ song rang loud, echoing across the valley, announcing a new day. We looked at each other and smiled then continued to quietly tell stories, taking our binoculars and glassing occasionally, to see if we’d spy any elk in the vicinity.

We wondered how the others in the group were doing, and I could see the weight on my “uncle’s” mind. He told stories of past hunts, hiking to the highest peaks, seeing horned owls, bears, and other wildlife, and a time when his horse took him to close to a tree. He laughed saying he was lazy and thought he’d simply break off the branch before him, but the branch was stout. Before he knew it, he rolled off the back of the horse and found himself laying on the ground. We shared a good chuckle and refilled our coffee from his thermos.

As we sat there smiling on the tailgate, we caught movement out of the corner of our eyes. We raised our binoculars and spied a herd of cow elk descending from the oak brush toward the meadow before us. We turned to look at each other in amazement. We thought, “Could this really be happening?”

Before the elk could clear the brush, he grabbed his rifle, and we slowly crouched to the ground, getting into a prone position. We knew the cows would be first, and we hoped a bull would follow. As he readied his rifle, resting it on his pack, I glassed further up the mountain into the oak brush to see if I could spy antlers.

The oak brush is thick, and it always amazes me at how quietly an elk can maneuver through. Since the branches are nearly as tall as they are you sometimes don’t even hear or see them until they emerge in a sparse area. I knew I needed to scan for movement or antlers that look like branches. Then I saw them! — Antlers!

I whispered, “I see a bull.” My uncle shuffled his position. I explained how far above, the direction he’s coming, and where I thought he’d emerge. Uncle readied, moving his rifle in the direction I’d indicated. I notified him when the bull would stop and when he’d begin down the hill again.

Before long there were more than a dozen cow elk feeding in the middle of the meadow. We waited patiently as we watched the bull emerge, clear the brush and then begin to feed out into the meadow. Uncle was patient. He waited for the elk to turn broadside, and then for him to move his front leg forward, and then he took his shot.

I watched through my binoculars as the big 6×6 bull spun, attempted to run, and then fell to the ground. After years of working so hard, he’d finally tagged a bull elk, and it wasn’t just a legal bull. It was a beautiful 6×6; every elk hunter’s dream. The cows scattered up the mountain, and we lay there in the dirt, in awe.

I looked over and saw the most massive smile I’d ever seen. The disappointment of not being able to climb the mountain had dispersed, and a tear of happiness filled my uncle’s eye.

He and I field dressed the bull, and when dad and his other friends returned there were huge smiles all around, lots of high fives, and congratulations, and still that tear in my uncle’s eye. We all loaded it into the truck, took it home and readied it to hang and cure. That night we shared fellowship and celebrated with elk tenderloin. The celebration was not only about his success but about health, happiness, and the meals his family would have.

We’d spent quality time together, watched that beautiful sunrise over those majestic mountains, listened to the coyotes’ song, watched hawks soar, and witnessed the incredible stealthiness of a massive animal. We helped one another, and despite my uncle’s health, we’d filled his hunting license. He and his family would have a freezer full of organic, low-fat meat. Hunting is about life, sustenance, family, friends, and conservation of all things, including animals and human beings.

Although I knew that hunting animals isn’t about killing, that season, it became even more evident. It’s about overcoming obstacles, finding sustenance, being skillful, and sometimes it’s about chance.


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Turkey and Elk Hunting – MAC Outdoors Episode 016

mac-outdoors-1400In episode 016 of the MAC Outdoors Podcast with Mia and Lea the duo discusses turkey and elk hunting. Lea gives you ideas of what you can do with turkey feathers, how to create mounts and other tips. Mia talks about utilizing the meat and cooking delicious recipes. Next, learn how to get in shape for this fall’s big game hunts.

Visit WSISports.com and use Lea’s coupon code, LLCO10. You’ll receive a 10% discount on their American made clothing, and as an affiliate, Lea will earn cash to help with her college endeavors.

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Turkey tortilla soup recipe – http://blog.beretta.com/author/mia-anstine

 

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ea’s Twitter handle – @Lea_Huntress
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Tune in each week as the dynamic mother/daughter duo share their adventures. You’ll find tips, tricks, lessons and tales from the trail. Mia is a mom, hunting guide, writer and vlogger who lives on a ranch in Colorado. Her daughter, Lea, also a guide, is a passionate young hunter who’s finishing high school and prepping for the journey to college. TUNE IN because you never know what obstacles and inspiration they’ll encounter as they head outside for new adventures.

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RMEF Celebrates 33rd Anniversary

https://youtu.be/NpfA_vmTrVA

RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is commemorating 33 years of carrying out its conservation mission to ensure the future of elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.

“We are deeply indebted to and grateful for men and women who had the foresight, energy and perseverance to establish this organization for the benefit of elk and elk country,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “They sacrificed much for a big game mammal that today is the thriving majestic symbol of our nation’s wild country.”

Founded on May 14, 1984, by four elk hunters in northwest Montana, RMEF began operations in a modest trailer in the middle of a field. At that time, there were approximately 550,000 elk in North America. Today, there are more than one million elk from coast-to-coast.

 

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As of December 31, 12016, RMEF and its partners carried out 10,469 conservation and hunting heritage outreach projects that conserved or enhanced 7,111,358 acres. It also opened or secured access to 1,105,667 acres. Additionally, RMEF assisted with successful elk reintroductions in seven states and one Canadian province. 

RMEF now has more than 222,000 thousand members and more than 500 chapters across the United States.

“We appreciate our volunteers, members and partners as well as sportsmen and women who support the RMEF. It is because of them that we are able to accelerate our mission across elk country,” added Allen.

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

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New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

RMEF logo high resolution

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is pleased to announce Philip Barrett as the new chairman of its Board of Directors. An avid hunter, RMEF life member and conservationist, Barrett is also vice president of finance for Chick-fil-A.

“I am very honored to be asked to serve RMEF in this capacity,” said Barrett. “It will be a joy to continue to work with such an outstanding group of board members and staff. They all have great passion for our mission and a strong willingness to be a part of the continued growth of the foundation.”

Barrett succeeds Chuck Roady as the 18th chairman to lead RMEF. The new board members are Mark Baker and Lewis Stapley.

 

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Among his goals, Barrett says RMEF will remain relevant and loyal to membership while continuing to protect public lands and hunting’s tradition and heritage. He will also focus on maintaining RMEF’s financial health while putting a high percentage of each dollar toward the organization’s on-the-ground conservation work.

“Philip brings significant business and life experience to our board,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “He is also a deep believer in furthering our conservation mission.”

Barrett began his career at Chick-fil-A as a corporate accounting manager in 1980. He has been responsible for all financial aspects of the company. Barrett also serves as chairman of the board of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ Outdoor Ministry and as a national board member for the Catch-A-Dream Foundation.

“RMEF is among the very best of conservation organizations. Our past accomplishments in the areas of land protection and elk reintroductions are well-known but we continue to have a great opportunity and responsibility to help shape the future of our public lands and wildlife management strategies in our great country,” added Barrett.

He and wife Peggy have two children and five grandchildren.

New RMEF board member bios:

Mark Baker
• Helena, Montana
• Managing Partner ABS Legal, PLLC
• Special Counsel to Mercury public strategy firm
• Past counsel/staff director for U.S. Senator Conrad Burns
• RMEF life member

Lewis Stapley
• Schroon Lake, New York
• Owner/operator Drake Lumber Corporation (1989-2003)
• Founded first volunteer emergency ambulance service in Schroon Lake, NY
• RMEF life member, sponsor member, Habitat Council & Trails Society
• RMEF Olympic Chapter (NY) co-founder and chairman & member of the New York State Leadership Team

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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RMEF Surpasses 7 Million Acre Conservation Milestone

RMEF Surpasses 7 Million Acre Conservation Milestone

RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation capped 2016, a year filled with several organizational conservation milestones, by surpassing seven million acres in lifetime land protection and habitat enhancement projects.

“This is a tremendous accomplishment that strikes at the very heart of our conservation mission. It is a reflection of decades of hard work bolstered by the support of dedicated volunteers, members, partner organizations, sponsors and many, many other good folks,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO.

RMEF seeks to permanently protect crucial elk range, migration corridors, calving grounds and other areas vital to elk and other wildlife. It does so by using acquisitions, access agreements and easements, conservation easements, land and estate donations, and other similar land conservation tools and projects.

Additionally, RMEF recognizes that healthy habitat is essential for wild, free-ranging elk herds so through the Managed Lands Initiative it helps fund and conduct prescribed burns, forest thinning, noxious weed treatments, water development projects and other such efforts to improve essential forage, cover, water and space components for wildlife. RMEF also supports and funds research and wildlife management work to help maintain healthy, thriving herds.

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“Protecting and enhancing habitat are among the most important things we can do for wildlife. We will continue to do all we can in leading that effort in elk country. RMEF will also seek to carry out more public access projects, assist elk reintroduction work, advocate for issues important to conservation as well as sportsmen and women, and do all we can to ensure our hunting heritage,” added Allen.

In November 2016, RMEF, through the Access Elk Country Initiative, topped one million acres in new or improved public access. And in August, RMEF surpassed 10,000 lifetime conservation projects.

RMEF 2016 Milestones Summary

• Surpassed 7 million acres of conserved or enhanced habitat
• Topped 1 million acres of new or improved public access
• Surpassed 10,000 lifetime conservation projects
• Recorded eighth consecutive year of record membership, totaling 222,325 as of December 31, 2016

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

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Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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RMEF Promotes Henning to Chief Conservation Officer

If you haven’t taken a moment to join a conservation organization, such as Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, now’s a great time. Hunters and non-hunters alike should take the time to support wildlife populations, health, habitats, and research. When we put our hard earned money into these upstanding organizations, we ensure the wild animals we are passionate about will thrive. ~Mia


RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is pleased to announce the promotion of Blake Henning to the newly created position of chief conservation officer.

“Blake brings a great deal of knowledge and strategic thinking to how we will manage RMEF for wildlife and land conservation into the 21st century,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “This is a crucial time for both wildlife and land/habitat issues in the U.S. and critical planning and action is a must. We believe that Blake will bring that leadership to RMEF.”

Henning spent the last six years as vice president of Lands and Conservation. His new title is reflective of his current role but also covers expanded duties in leading government affairs and advocacy. Additional priorities will be to forge stronger leadership ties with state and federal natural resource management agencies as well as non-governmental partners.

“I am both honored and excited for this opportunity,” said Henning. “Now more than ever it is imperative to raise a conservation-minded voice that makes a long-lasting difference for elk, other wildlife, their habitat and our hunting heritage.”

Henning joined RMEF in 2000. He holds a B.S. degree in Wildlife Management and a M.S. in Wildlife Biology. Henning’s interest in conservation and hunting first began while growing up on a farm in southeast Nebraska. He is passionate about hunting, fishing, and conserving our natural resources for the next generation.

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of nearly 220,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 6.8 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


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