HEY YOU! Leave Those Cute Fawns Alone

Awe! They’re so cute! Those cute, little, spotted deer fawns, aren’t they the most adorable things ever? I love seeing the newborn animals during the springtime when I’m outdoors. It means the resource is being renewed and we’ll have more wild animals for future years. Although it’s fabulous to see them, view them, and continue on, New Mexico’s Department of Game and Fish has shared the ever needed reminder — LEAVE THOSE BABIES ALONE!

Public reminded to leave young wildlife alone

SANTA FE – Spring in New Mexico is an exciting time for wildlife. This is the time of year when most babies are born. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish reminds the public to leave alone any deer or antelope fawns, elk calves, bear cubs or other wild animals they may find.

Most young-of-the-year wildlife that people discover are simply hiding while awaiting their parents’ return from foraging nearby.

Removing these young animals can cost them their lives, Orrin Duvuvuei, department deer and pronghorn biologist, warned.

“For about a week after birth, young wildlife exhibit hiding behaviors to avoid detection and increase their chance for survival. You might think it has been abandoned, but in reality, the mother is typically a few hundred yards away,” Duvuvuei said. “In most cases, the best thing to do is just leave it alone and quietly leave the area.”

Returning a young wild animal to its natural environment after it’s been carried off by a human can be very difficult and may not work in many cases, Duvuvuei said.

If you see young wildlife, please follow these guidelines:

  • Do not approach. Its mother is likely close by and aware that you are in the area.
  • Leave the area quickly and quietly.
  • Observe the animal from a safe distance. Typically wildlife babies that appear to be dry have bonded with their mothers, and you can safely take their pictures from this distance, but don’t linger in the area or touch the animal.
  • If you think the animal has been abandoned, if possible mark the location using a GPS and contact the department by calling (888) 248-6866.

For more information about living with wildlife in New Mexico, please visit the department website, www.wildlife.state.nm.us.

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The post Public reminded to leave young wildlife alone appeared first on New Mexico Department of Game & Fish.


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First “Youth Warrior” Award by SWC – Conservation

How are we mentoring the youth and how are we rewarding them for being warriors who are giving in support for conservation? This year Stewards of Wildlife Conservation (SWC) decided to create the “Youth Warrior” award because of one young lady’s selfless giving toward the cause of conserving wildlife populations. Learn more about the award and the wonderful work SWC is doing to create healthy herds. Another question you should ask is how are your children spending their money?

Stewards of Wildlife Conservation Gives First “Youth Warrior” Award

SWC Cole Reid and Carysn NorvellUvalde, TEXAS – At four feet tall, Carsyn Norvell is a true giving warrior.  In fact, nearly three and a half years ago she was the first youth ever to donate to Stewards of Wildlife Conservation (SWC), a non-profit organization based in Uvalde, Texas. Norvell hasn’t stopped since that first donation; she’s given several times in 2017 and even emptied her savings to give to SWC at this year’s Dallas Safari Club convention in January – a total of $80 for a single donation. It’s because of these selfless acts of charity, SWC’s Director of Wildlife Sustainability, Cole Reid, is presenting her with SWC’s first “Youth Warrior Award.” The award will be given at SWC’s Annual Banquet April 28, 2018, in Austin, Texas.

“It is so important for us”, says Cole Reid, “to focus on education and community outreach, especially for the younger generations.  The conservation field is mostly dominated by the older generations and if we don’t get the younger generations motivated it will make the fight that much harder.  Carsyn not only makes me proud as a steward of this earth but she gives me so much hope for the future of wildlife conservation!”

SWC Youth Warrior trophy

SWC’s Youth Warrior award is given to youth ages 8-18 who exemplify both love of animals and charitable acts. Due to Carsyn’s overwhelming support for SWC, she has been invited to SWC on many occasions.  The award she will be receiving in April also comes with more opportunities to visit the SWC property and interact with the wildlife.  To learn more about becoming a youth conservation warrior and have a chance to visit SWC and even win next years Youth Warrior Award, visit www.stewardsofwildlife.org/memberships to sign up to be a Youth Conservation Warrior.

About Stewards of Wildlife:

Stewards of Wildlife Conservation is a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation and proliferation of wildlife as well as the habitats and natural resources they utilize.  Stewards of Wildlife offers a home to more than 80 species from around the globe.  These animals are breeding and stable in vast areas in order to provide the most comfortable and natural living situation possible.  Stewards of Wildlife is focused on bringing together animal resources from the private landowners and the public sector zoos in order to create “meta-populations” of species that are vital, sustainable, and can maintain evolutionary potential.

We understand that there are many organizations and groups with the best intentions trying to help wildlife and realize that our contribution is space and expertise. Though our priority concern is protecting the rarest and most endangered species, Stewards of Wildlife is ultimately concerned about all of the flora and fauna worldwide. Learn more at http://stewardsofwildlife.com.


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Change your clocks and your driving habits

As clocks change watch for wildlife on the highway

In a recent YouTube video, I shared a headlight cleaning hack, and a story about how I came to have one clean, shiny headlight and a dull one. You guessed it. I whacked a deer. While I pursue wildlife during hunting season, I don’t enjoy hitting them with my vehicle.

In our neck of the woods, we drive the “Gauntlet.” It’s called that because of the numbers of deer, elk, and other animals that we encounter on the route. You might also guess that when we change the clocks, and daylight visibility decreases, the numbers of animals on the road increase. We have to slow down and pay attention more closely.

Return to daylight standard time: Change your clocks and your driving habits

CPW_SiteLogoDENVER – November 5 marks the end of daylight saving time, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds motorists to be particularly cautious to avoid wildlife-related accidents on our roads as daylight hours get shorter.

“The fall time change happens to be right in line with peak mating season for some of our wildlife, especially deer. Bears are also still actively looking for food and the calories needed before hibernation,” said Crystal Chick, CPW area wildlife manager. “Animals are on the move this time of year, most actively between dawn and dusk. With shorter daylight hours, that makes wildlife harder to see right when people are making their daily commutes.”

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The Colorado Department of Transportation sees an average of 3,300 reported wildlife collisions each year, and notes more car accidents involving wildlife occur in November than in any other month. According to the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, the average property damage costs from animal-vehicle collisions is over $3,400.

The following precautions are good advice all year long, but particularly at and around the change back to daylight standard time:

  • Slow down. Swerving at high speeds increases the danger of an accident. Moderate speeds maintain a driver’s reaction time and allow an appropriate response to animals on or near roads.
  • Stay alert, particularly while driving between dusk and dawn. This is when deer and other common wildlife are most active and more likely to be crossing roadways.
  • Scan ahead and watch for movement and shining eyes along roadsides. If you see one animal, you should expect it will be accompanied by others.
  • Obey traffic signs, particularly wildlife warning signs. Though incidents can happen anywhere, transportation authorities attempt to reduce the number of incidents by posting signage and lowering speeds in areas where wildlife are active.
  • When animals are seen on or near the road, slow down or stop, honk the horn and/or flash headlights. This warns the animal to avoid the road and alerts other drivers to the potential hazard.
  • Always wear seat belts. Unfortunately, not every collision is avoidable, and the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration states that the risk of serious injury and death in a crash is reduced by half when seat belts are worn.

Drivers involved in a wildlife/vehicle collision should report the accident to the Colorado State Patrol by calling *CSP (star key and 277). For additional information on wildlife and traffic safety, visit cpw.state.co.us.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Outdoors and Hunting – Sportswomen You Ought to Know Series

In a recent interview with Gabriella Hoffman, for her ‘Sportswomen You Ought to Know Series’, she asks about my road to the outdoors and hunting, my favorite hunting trip to date, the Field & Stream cover, and more.

I pass on the hunting tradition, locavore idea, and outdoor experience for a variety of reasons. One big reason is to share a connection with nature. Additionally, there is a lot of public land out there, which is incredible if you take the time to explore. Many of us take the areas and the pursuits for granted. Did you know that public lands are being sold off? have you been out there to explore? Where do you think the future of hunting is headed? Will you, or do you speak up? Let me know in the comments then read below to learn how you can get involved.

Here is information about our local Colorado Parks and Wildlife public meeting. I hope to see you there.


Meeting scheduled for southwest communities to discuss future of hunting, fishing, outdoor recreation in Colorado 

DURANGO, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife is facing long-term budget issues that will affect how the state’s parks and wildlife are managed in the future. To present the issues, CPW will hold a public meeting to discuss the “Future of Hunting, Fishing and Outdoor Recreation in Colorado” for Southwest Region residents, 6 p.m., Sept. 25.

The meeting will be held by teleconference to allow residents of the far-flung Southwest Region to participate. At the meeting, CPW officials will explain the agency’s current challenges, present some ideas for fixing the budget problems, and provide an opportunity for the public to participate in developing solutions.

Residents can attend the meeting at any of the Southwest Region’s four wildlife service centers:

  • Durango, region headquarters, 415 Turner Drive in the Bodo Park
  • Gunnison, wildlife office, 300 W. New York Ave.
  • San Luis Valley, Monte Vista wildlife office, 0722 Road 1 East
  • Montrose, wildlife office, 2300 S. Townsend Ave. (U.S. Highway 550)

Besides discussing budget issues, CPW staff will give an update on regional hunting, fishing and parks activities in a roundtable format.CPW is managed as an “enterprise agency”, which means it does not receive any general sales tax dollars from Colorado taxpayers. The majority of the agency’s revenue comes from parks users and from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses. The agency also receives grants from Great Outdoors Colorado, and federal excise taxes levied on the sale of hunting and fishing equipment.

CPW has not raised resident hunting and fishing licenses since 2005.

A bill to address the budget issues was submitted to the 2017 Colorado General Assembly. The bill passed with bi-partisan support in the House of Representatives. However, the bill did not reach the Senate floor when it failed to pass out of committee by a vote of 3-2.

The agency will be looking at funding ideas in 2018, as well as ways that it can continue to provide sustainable wildlife populations, world-class outdoor recreation and stewardship programs. Those details will be explained at the Sept. 25 meeting.

“Colorado hunters, anglers, state parks users and recreation users care deeply about outdoor resources in the state, and CPW works to maintain and improve those resources from our prairies to our peaks,” said Patt Dorsey, manager for CPW’s Southwest Region. “We want to continue to provide customer service and recreational opportunities, and we need to think seriously about how we do that with an increasing population and a shrinking budget.”

Funds for the wildlife section of the agency and the park section of the agency are, by law, kept completely separate. There is no comingling of revenues or expenditures.

“Coloradans are lucky to live in a state with a diversity of recreation opportunities and wildlife resources and they’ve always been willing to pay for those privileges,” Dorsey said. “CPW is reaching out to Colorado residents to bridge the gap between the present and the future.”

Those unable to attend the meeting can view an on-line presentation which details CPW’s financial challenges and a preliminary proposal for increasing hunting and fishing licenses at:
http://cpw.state.co.us/aboutus/Pages/Future-Conservation-Recreation.aspx.

After watching the presentation, the public is urged to provide comments in an on-line survey at: https://www.research.net/r/CPW-Future.

For more information about the meeting, contact Joe Lewandowski, Southwest Region public information officer at joe.lewandowski@state.co.us.


CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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Become a Conservation Officer | New Mexico Department of Game & Fish

Do you love the outdoors, wildlife, conservation, hunting, and educating others? Becoming a conservation officer might be right up your alley. New Mexico’s Department of Game & Fish is seeking new officers. This is a great way for the next generation to become involved in the big conservation picture.

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