A Wildlife Reminder: Time to be Bear Aware  

CPW_SiteLogoBears have emerged from hibernation and are on the prowl for food. Colorado Parks and Wildlife is sending its annual reminder, asking Colorado residents and visitors to be “Bear Aware.”

In early spring, bears can usually find sources of natural food as wild plants begin to grow nutritious new sprouts. Bears also prefer natural sources of food. But if food becomes scarce some bears will go to residential areas looking for a meal.

Significant bear/human conflicts usually don’t start until mid-summer. But now’s the time to start thinking about how you can be bear aware. By taking some simple precautions, you can avoid conflicts with bears at your home and in your neighborhood.

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Bears are out and Colorado Parks and Wildlife is reminding everyone to be “bear aware.”

Here is a list that will help us to keep bears wild:

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Around the house 

  • Keep garbage in a well-secured location.
  • Only put out garbage on the morning of pickup.
  • Clean garbage cans regularly to keep them odor free. The scent of ammonia can deter bears.
  • Use a bear-resistant trash can or dumpster. These are available from your trash hauler or on Internet sites.
  • Bears have an excellent sense of smell, so try to prevent odors. If you don’t have secure storage, put items that might become smelly into the freezer until trash day.
  • Keep garage doors closed.
  • Lock your doors when you’re away from home and at night.
  • Keep the bottom floor windows of your house closed when you’re not at home.
  • Clean-up thoroughly after picnics in the yard or on the deck. Don’t allow food odors to linger.
  • Talk to your neighbors and kids about being bear aware.
Minimize items that attract bears or other wildlife
  • Do not attract other wildlife by feeding them.
  • Don’t leave pet food or stock feed outside.
  • Bird feeders are a major source of bear/human conflicts. Attract birds naturally with flowers and water baths. Do not hang bird feeders from April 15 to Nov. 15.
  • If you must have bird feeders: clean up beneath them every day, bring them in at night, and hang them high so that they’re completely inaccessible to bears.
  • Bears have good memories and will return to places they’ve found food.
  • Allow grills to burn for a couple of minutes after cooking to burn off grease and to eliminate odors. Clean the grill after each use.
  • If you have fruit trees, pick fruit before it gets too ripe. Don’t allow fruit to rot on the ground.
  • Secure compost piles. Bears are attracted to the scent of rotting food — and they’ll eat almost anything.
  • If you keep small livestock, keep animals in a fully covered enclosure, don’t store food outside, keep enclosures clean to minimize odors, hang rags soaked in ammonia around the enclosure.
  • If you have bee hives, install electric fencing where allowed.
Be careful with vehicles and at campsites
  • Do not keep food in your vehicle; roll up windows and lock the doors of your vehicles.
  • When car-camping, secure all food and coolers in a locked vehicle after you’ve eaten.
  • Keep a clean camp, whether you’re in a campground or in the back-country.
  • When camping in the back-country, hang food 100 feet or more from campsite.
  • Don’t bring any food or fragrant items into your tent
  • Cook food well away from your tent; wash dishes thoroughly.

For more information go to the Living with Wildlife section on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife web site: cpw.state.co.us.CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


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New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

New Chairman, Members Added to RMEF Board

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MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation is pleased to announce Philip Barrett as the new chairman of its Board of Directors. An avid hunter, RMEF life member and conservationist, Barrett is also vice president of finance for Chick-fil-A.

“I am very honored to be asked to serve RMEF in this capacity,” said Barrett. “It will be a joy to continue to work with such an outstanding group of board members and staff. They all have great passion for our mission and a strong willingness to be a part of the continued growth of the foundation.”

Barrett succeeds Chuck Roady as the 18th chairman to lead RMEF. The new board members are Mark Baker and Lewis Stapley.

 

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Among his goals, Barrett says RMEF will remain relevant and loyal to membership while continuing to protect public lands and hunting’s tradition and heritage. He will also focus on maintaining RMEF’s financial health while putting a high percentage of each dollar toward the organization’s on-the-ground conservation work.

“Philip brings significant business and life experience to our board,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “He is also a deep believer in furthering our conservation mission.”

Barrett began his career at Chick-fil-A as a corporate accounting manager in 1980. He has been responsible for all financial aspects of the company. Barrett also serves as chairman of the board of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes’ Outdoor Ministry and as a national board member for the Catch-A-Dream Foundation.

“RMEF is among the very best of conservation organizations. Our past accomplishments in the areas of land protection and elk reintroductions are well-known but we continue to have a great opportunity and responsibility to help shape the future of our public lands and wildlife management strategies in our great country,” added Barrett.

He and wife Peggy have two children and five grandchildren.

New RMEF board member bios:

Mark Baker
• Helena, Montana
• Managing Partner ABS Legal, PLLC
• Special Counsel to Mercury public strategy firm
• Past counsel/staff director for U.S. Senator Conrad Burns
• RMEF life member

Lewis Stapley
• Schroon Lake, New York
• Owner/operator Drake Lumber Corporation (1989-2003)
• Founded first volunteer emergency ambulance service in Schroon Lake, NY
• RMEF life member, sponsor member, Habitat Council & Trails Society
• RMEF Olympic Chapter (NY) co-founder and chairman & member of the New York State Leadership Team

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About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


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Hunting, Conservation and Recruitment – Outdoor Adventures with Jayson Episode 26

This is Ladies Month over at the Outdoor Adventures with Jayson podcast. In Episode 26 he interviews yours truly and the list of topics is grandiose. Tune in, turn up the volume, and join us as we chat about all things outdoors and hunting.

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Topics and Links:

Sportsmen Call on Zinke’s Leadership for Public Lands

Sportsmen Call on Zinke’s Leadership for Public Lands

RooseveltTrump’s newest cabinet member has opportunity to support habitat and access on the public lands that are part of our national identity

WASHINGTON, D.C. – This morning, U.S. Congressman Ryan Zinke was officially given the top job at the Department of the Interior, where he’ll be responsible for the management of public lands, minerals, migratory birds, and endangered species. Hunters, anglers, and the conservation community look forward to working with Zinke to support habitat conservation, sportsmen’s access, and increased public involvement in the management of America’s public lands.

“More than ever before, we need to see the Secretary of the Interior act with conviction as the nation’s top champion of public lands and foremost arbiter of balanced management for fish and wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation,” says K.C. Walsh, chairman of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership’s Corporate Council and president of Simms Fishing Products in Bozeman, Mont. “The hunting and fishing community is looking forward to working with Secretary Zinke and his staff to improve collaborative conservation of natural resources that are the envy of all the world.”

From his earliest days in office, Zinke will be faced with charting a path forward for the Bureau of Land Management’s revised land use planning process, a rule that is supported by the sporting community but faces an uncertain future. The House voted three weeks ago to block the BLM’s new Planning 2.0 rule, which creates greater agency transparency and gives the public three additional opportunities to weigh in on land-use plans.

If the Senate passes a similar resolution under the Congressional Review Act, it would likely prevent the BLM from ever issuing a rule with substantially similar benefits. Sportsmen are encouraging Congress to take a step back and instead let Zinke lead on making further changes to the rule, while retaining its many benefits.

“We encourage Secretary Zinke to simply solve problems constructively: Bring together diverse stakeholders, and find common ground for the benefit of fish, wildlife, and our sporting traditions,” says Whit Fosburgh, TRCP’s president and CEO. “Sportsmen and women stand ready and willing to help shape a positive future for our public lands. We’re just asking that remaining concerns with the BLM Planning rule are addressed through a process that also keeps all of the improvements made to public lands management.”

During his tenure, Zinke will also oversee the implementation of federal conservation plans created to keep the greater sage grouse off the endangered species list.

“We’re hopeful that having a true sportsman in this role will be positive for sage grouse as well as the other iconic game species dependent upon conservation of sagebrush habitat, like mule deer and pronghorn antelope,” says Miles Moretti, president of the Mule Deer Foundation. “Hunters, ranchers, and other stakeholders are ready to work with Sec. Zinke to safeguard many traditional uses of this landscape through collaborative conservation.”

The TRCP and other sportsmen’s groups came out in support of Zinke’s nomination in December 2016, based mainly on his opposition to privatizing or transferring federal public lands to individual states. In June 2016, Zinke was the only member of the House Natural Resources Committee to cross party lines and vote against a bill that would allow states to acquire up to two million acres of national forest lands to be managed primarily for timber production, locking Americans out of our public lands. Later that summer, he resigned as a delegate to the Republican nominating convention because of the party’s position on the transfer of federal public lands to the states. Zinke is also in favor of full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which uses revenues from offshore oil and gas production to conserve important natural resources and open public access.

More than 50,000 Americans have signed a petition opposing the sale or transfer of our public lands. Learn more here.

Inspired by the legacy of Theodore Roosevelt, the TRCP is a coalition of organizations and grassroots partners working together to preserve the traditions of hunting and fishing. By ensuring access to quality fish and wildlife habitat, we’re also safeguarding the $646 billion that sportsmen and women help contribute to the American economy.


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Pronghorns Captured and Relocated in New Mexico

Pronghorns captured and relocated to Santa Ana Pueblo and southeastern New Mexico

nmdgf-logo-color_originalSANTA FE – The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish captured 135 pronghorns on a private ranch near Cimarron this week and relocated 40 to Santa Ana Pueblo and 66 to Bureau of Land Management property in southeastern New Mexico.

The operation allowed the department to remove excess pronghorns from the Express UU Bar Ranch near Cimarron to augment herds in other parts of the state. Twenty-five of the captured pronghorns were bucks released back onto the ranch.

Pronghorns captured and relocated to Santa Ana Pueblo and southeastern New Mexico. New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, news release 2-3-2017

The department uses a helicopter to herd pronghorns into a funnel-shaped, fenced area where staff on foot then drive them into an enclosed corral. Individual animals are caught by hand and processed for transport or release. Veterinarians oversee and assist department biologists during the effort.

At least a third of the pronghorns sent to southeastern New Mexico were equipped with radio collars, which will allow department biologists to track their survival. Significant habitat improvements have been made in the area to support more pronghorns, said Orrin Duvuvuei, the department’s deer and pronghorn biologist.

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Pronghorns released at Santa Ana Pueblo are part of an ongoing effort between the department and the pueblo to re-establish pronghorns on historic rangeland along the Interstate-25 corridor between Albuquerque and Santa Fe. If the herd grows substantially, the pueblo tribal council may in the future consider granting a limited number of public hunting permits.

For more information about the department and wildlife management, please visit www.wildlife.state.nm.us.


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RMEF Surpasses 7 Million Acre Conservation Milestone

RMEF Surpasses 7 Million Acre Conservation Milestone

RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation capped 2016, a year filled with several organizational conservation milestones, by surpassing seven million acres in lifetime land protection and habitat enhancement projects.

“This is a tremendous accomplishment that strikes at the very heart of our conservation mission. It is a reflection of decades of hard work bolstered by the support of dedicated volunteers, members, partner organizations, sponsors and many, many other good folks,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO.

RMEF seeks to permanently protect crucial elk range, migration corridors, calving grounds and other areas vital to elk and other wildlife. It does so by using acquisitions, access agreements and easements, conservation easements, land and estate donations, and other similar land conservation tools and projects.

Additionally, RMEF recognizes that healthy habitat is essential for wild, free-ranging elk herds so through the Managed Lands Initiative it helps fund and conduct prescribed burns, forest thinning, noxious weed treatments, water development projects and other such efforts to improve essential forage, cover, water and space components for wildlife. RMEF also supports and funds research and wildlife management work to help maintain healthy, thriving herds.

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“Protecting and enhancing habitat are among the most important things we can do for wildlife. We will continue to do all we can in leading that effort in elk country. RMEF will also seek to carry out more public access projects, assist elk reintroduction work, advocate for issues important to conservation as well as sportsmen and women, and do all we can to ensure our hunting heritage,” added Allen.

In November 2016, RMEF, through the Access Elk Country Initiative, topped one million acres in new or improved public access. And in August, RMEF surpassed 10,000 lifetime conservation projects.

RMEF 2016 Milestones Summary

• Surpassed 7 million acres of conserved or enhanced habitat
• Topped 1 million acres of new or improved public access
• Surpassed 10,000 lifetime conservation projects
• Recorded eighth consecutive year of record membership, totaling 222,325 as of December 31, 2016

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

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Baiting Operation to Move Deer, Elk From Highway in Gunnison Basin

CPW planning baiting operation to move deer, elk from highway in Gunnison Basin

CPW_SiteLogoGUNNISON, Colo. – In the coming days, Colorado Parks and Wildlife will start a baiting operation in the Gunnison Basin to move deer and elk away from roads and to counter the effects of recent snowfall.

A meeting in Gunnison to discuss the program is scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday, January 19, at the Fred Field Building at the county fairgrounds, 275 S. Spruce. CPW will be asking people to sign up, volunteering time, equipment, access, and other resources in case they’re needed.

In specific areas along U.S. Highway 50 for about 20 miles to the west and 30 miles to the east of the town of Gunnison, CPW will bait where groups of big game are gathering along and crossing the highway.

“We have seen a spike in road-kill mortality recently,” said J Wenum, CPW’s area wildlife manager in Gunnison. “Our goals are to protect drivers and their passengers by preventing wildlife-vehicle collisions and to be ready to go into a feeding operation if necessary.”

The baiting operation will help CPW to take an adaptive management approach as weather, forage, and animal conditions change throughout the winter. Given the recent mild weather and forecast, CPW is optimistic that deer will survive the winter on their own. However, the bait sites can quickly be converted to feed sites if weather conditions deteriorate.

 

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Significant snowfall in the Gunnison Basin began the first week of January, and so far, about 50 inches have accumulated in the lower elevations along the highway. Those lower elevation areas along the highway are also considered to be critical mule deer winter range. CPW defines critical winter range as areas where 90 percent of the animals spend winters. 

“The importance of these wintering areas cannot be overstated,” explained Wenum. “We’ve been watching the situation closely, and so far, deer and elk appear to be doing well. They are able to move through the snow and to dig down to forage.”

According to Wenum, mule deer rely on stored fat to make it through the winter. Disturbing animals on winter range causes them to burn additional fat. People can help wildlife survive the winter by doing the following: Slow down on the highway and watch out for animals at all hours of the day and night. Avoid making long stops and getting out of cars or approaching herds of animals. Avoid recreating in areas where big game animals are congregating. Keep pets on a leash. Respect BLM, U.S. Forest Service and other area closures.

It is illegal to feed big game. Deer and elk have complex digestive systems and have specific dietary needs.  Feeding them the wrong foods or feeding them at the wrong time can kill them. In emergency circumstances, with CPW authorization, people can provide food for big game.  It is critical that the feed provided be the proper type to meet nutritional needs and be digestible by the species.

The basin has received above average snowfall, and temperatures have been above average. This is in contrast to the winter of 2007-08 when CPW fed deer in the Gunnison Basin and heavy wet snow fell in early December, followed by extreme cold. That winter, more than 100 inches of snow fell and remained on the ground through May. Deer had a difficult time moving and digging through crusted snow for food.

Deer and elk are have evolved to survive harsh Colorado winters. Due to a long, warm fall, deer went into the winter in good physical condition. CPW will continue to monitor winter range conditions, evaluate the body condition of deer, observe their behavior, and examine deer that have died to check fat-stores. If wildlife managers observe that range conditions have deteriorated, animal body conditions have declined excessively, and foresee that large numbers of deer could die, CPW could quickly ramp up to a feeding effort.

“We know that people understand winter is a very difficult time of year for wildlife and that some winter mortality is natural and expected,” said Patt Dorsey, CPW’s southwest region manager. “We want to be flexible and nimble to changing conditions in the basin and are asking the public to support requests from CPW and local land management agencies.”

Some people have asked why CPW didn’t start feeding already. Any major operation takes time to organize and requires a lot logistically: specially formulated feed, specialized equipment, resources, volunteers, additional staff, etc.

“This is not a decision that CPW takes lightly,” Dorsey explained. “There are pros, cons and a lot of unknowns here. We would love to have a crystal ball.”

There are many considerations and trade-offs. Recent studies have demonstrated that concentrating deer in large numbers can increase disease transmission.  Cost is another consideration. The 2007-08 operation cost $2.8 million.

“Our primary concern is the long-term sustainability of deer herds in the Gunnison Basin,” Dorsey said. “We know that’s the public’s concern, too and we appreciate their support. This will be a team effort, no matter what — and we need everyone on the same team.”

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CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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Wildlife Habitat Permanently Protected in Colorado – RMEF

Wildlife Habitat Permanently Protected in Colorado

RMEF logo high resolutionMISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation teamed up with conservation-minded landowners and Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) to permanently protect 1,742 acres of prime elk and greater sage grouse habitat in northwest Colorado. The project also improves public hunting in a limited draw unit.

“We appreciate landowners who look outside of themselves and recognize the vital importance of protecting their land,” said Blake Henning, RMEF chief conservation officer. “Protecting this property will maintain its wildlife, agricultural and habitat values while also benefitting nearby public lands.”

The tract is nearly surrounded by public lands. It is also adjacent to the Diamond Breaks Wilderness Study Area and just a few miles away from Dinosaur National Monument and Browns Park National Wildlife Refuge.

“Projects like this protect migration corridors and enhance the connectivity of wildlife habitat. In this particular case, more than 238,000 acres of landscape are now knitted together for the benefit of wildlife and its habitat,” added Henning.

Located in the Pot Creek and Dry Creek watersheds, tributaries of the Green River, the property is key summer and winter range for big game and home to more than 500 elk as well as mule deer and other bird and animal life. It is also core greater sage grouse range and lies within a two-mile radius of leks in both Colorado and Utah, one of which contains more than 60 males.

 

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Though the conservation easement is on private property, the landowner granted a public access easement to CPW allowing public elk hunts every year going forward in the highly limited draw unit of Game Management Unit 1. 

“CPW will manage the hunts and public hunters will be allowed to access the landlocked BLM-administered lands,” said Bill de Vergie, CPW’s area wildlife manager from Meeker. “This is very beneficial for wildlife and our sportsmen and I’m glad to see it happen.”

The landowner previously placed a RMEF conservation easement on a 796-acre plot of adjacent ranch land immediately across the border in Utah.

About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7.1 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” atwww.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.

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Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

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Colorado Lynx Dies of Natural Causes

Lynx died of natural causes

CPW_SiteLogoDURANGO, Colo. – A lynx that was found dead on a ski slope Jan. 8 at the Purgatory Ski Resort died of natural causes, Colorado Parks and Wildlife announced Wednesday. The lynx was seen by dozens of people at the ski area and a video of the cat was viewed on social media nearly 1 million times.

A necropsy of the 11-year-old male found a tumor in the animal’s throat that prevented it from eating. Although not common, tumors are found in wildlife.

While the news was greeted with regret by many people, this lynx is symbolic of the success of CPW’s reintroduction program.

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This is a photograph of a lynx being released by CPW as part of the reintroduction program in 2006 near Creede, Colo.

“The cat lived a long life in the wild and spent it’s time in some of Colorado’s most incredible backcountry,” said Scott Wait, senior terrestrial biologist for CPW’s southwest region. Wait was involved with the reintroduction from the start and continues to work on long-term monitoring efforts.

Lynx from Canada and Alaska were transplanted to Colorado starting in 1999. Most were released near the Weminuche Wilderness in southwest Colorado. The area was chosen because it contains few roads compared with other areas in the state. All the cats that were released were fitted with radio collars and tracked by researchers. This allowed CPW to monitor them, watch for mortalities, find their dens and locate newborn kittens. A microchip was implanted into all the kittens  ‒ the same type pet veterinarians use ‒ so that researchers could identify the animals later if they were found.

 

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To the delight of biologists, a chip was found in this lynx and it revealed the cat was born in the Bear Creek area near Telluride in 2005. The cat’s mother was one of the original lynx released in the reintroduction program. A record number of lynx dens, 16, were found that year by CPW biologists.

In 2009, the cat was captured as part of a research effort and fitted with a GPS collar which revealed that it was living in the remote area between Telluride, Rico and the Purgatory ski area. The collar eventually fell off the animal.

“The lynx lived in what is the best type of habitat for its species, high elevation and thick spruce-fir forest. This shows that much of Colorado’s high country is suitable lynx habitat,” Wait said.

A long-term monitoring project in southwest Colorado that uses snow-tracking and remote cameras has shown that lynx are occupying ideal habitat and are doing well in the wild. Frequent lynx sightings in many mountain areas also provide anecdotal evidence that cats are now part of the Colorado landscape. Because the cats are elusive and live in remote areas, CPW cannot accurately estimate the population of the large felines.

Even though the lynx was in its last days when it was seen on the ski slopes, the sightings provided a rare opportunity for people to see a large cat in the wild, said Patt Dorsey, CPW’s southwest regional manager.

“We talk a lot about the importance of wildlife, but when we get to see extraordinary animals in the wild, it gives us a much greater appreciation of their beauty and of the importance of conserving the natural world,” Dorsey said.

To read more about lynx, go to the CPW web site at: http://cpw.state.co.us.

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

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RMEF Marks Record Year for Membership

RMEF Marks 8th Consecutive Year of Record Membership

RMEF logo high resolution

MISSOULA, Mont.—The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation rings in 2017 with an all-time record of 222,235 members.

“We are extremely grateful for all our members, volunteers, partners, and other sportsmen and women who support our conservation mission,” said David Allen, RMEF president and CEO. “This continual growth is a strong indicator of the values and importance we all share in maintaining and improving elk and elk country, hunting and public access opportunity, and advocating for issues vital to our hunting heritage.”

The new figure marks the eighth consecutive year of record growth. It also marks a 32 percent increase in membership since 2008.

2016 included several RMEF lifetime milestones such as surpassing 10,000 conservation projects, topping one million acres of new or improved public access and surpassing a combined seven million acres of wildlife habitat protected or enhanced.

 

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RMEF also provided volunteer manpower and financial support in helping to return elk to their native range in West Virginia for the first time in more than a century.

 

“We especially appreciate the vital contributions of our dedicated volunteer army that numbers 11,000 across more than 500 RMEF chapters nationwide. They selflessly work countless hours to benefit elk and elk country,” added Allen.

The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation also expanded its outreach and educational efforts with its #HuntingIsConservation social media campaign which reached more than 24.4 million people in 2016 and will continue into 2017.

RMEF recently topped 485,000 likes on Facebook while the RMEF blog Elk Tracks has approximately 1.45 million page views. Its YouTube channel has more than 1.2 million views plus an additionally 82,000 followers on Instagram. RMEF is also growing on Twitter and LinkedIn.

Coming in early 2017, RMEF plans to launch a new online venture that will serve as a complete source for all things elk, elk country, hunting and conservation.


About the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation:
Founded over 30 years ago, fueled by hunters and a membership of more than 222,000 strong, RMEF has conserved more than 7 million acres for elk and other wildlife. RMEF also works to open and improve public access, fund and advocate for science-based resource management, and ensure the future of America’s hunting heritage. Discover why “Hunting Is Conservation™” at www.rmef.org or 800-CALL ELK.
Take action: join and/or donate.


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Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.