Buy Your Colorado OTC Hunting Licenses

I’m not sure about you, but I’m getting excited about hunting season. While the draw deadline for Colorado’s limited hunting licenses was way back in April, the results came out and some of us didn’t draw everything we’d applied for. If you’re a hunter, I’m sure you already know this is typical. It’s how it goes and is part of the process. 

Tags are limited based on the need to manage wildlife populations and the number of hunters in the woods at any given time. That being said, in our state, there are units which offer Over the Counter Tags (OTC) for some seasons and species. These tags go on sale August 25th this year. If you didn’t draw your first choice(s), you can buy an OTC tag and still have the opportunity to put some meat in the freezer. Learn more below.

Start of ‘over-the-counter’ and ‘leftover’ hunting license sales brings excitement

CPW_SiteLogoCOLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. – Staff at Colorado Parks and Wildlife offices statewide are bracing for two of the biggest days of the year: “OTC” day on July 25 and “leftover” day on Aug. 1.

CPW staff say OTC day – the first day hunting licenses can be bought on an “over-the-counter” basis – is just a warm-up for leftover day when lines form days in advance, resembling crowds awaiting the opening of a Hollywood blockbuster or to buy the newest smartphone gadget. People camp out at CPW offices to ensure they get first shot at prime hunting licenses leftover from the draw.

The excitement over the start of hunting season begins on OTC day. Many of the 500,000 or so who hunt in Colorado request licenses through a draw system. The draw is the only way to buy mule deer licenses. And it’s also a way to get bear, elk, whitetail deer and pronghorn licenses. Typically there is far more demand than available licenses.

Others, however, simply buy their elk, bear, whitetail deer and pronghorn licenses over-the-counter at CPW’s 18 offices or at other retail outlets. And it is usually a busy day.

Hunting-license-sales-colorado-cc241a51-f67c-4c89-9584-860fa2db7ea6Various CPW offices handle the welcome crush of business in different ways. The CPW office in Salida makes it a party, cooking breakfast burritos on site and providing coffee to the hunters.

“We have done this for the past 14 years and is always well-received by the hunters,” said Jim Aragon, area wildlife manager in Salida. “I think some people really don’t care if they get the license they were looking for as long as the burritos are there.”

Visitors to the CPW offices in Lamar and Pueblo will find doughnuts and coffee or water.

In the Southeast Region office in Colorado Springs, the staff is more focused on serving customers as quickly as possible, given the high volume of traffic expected that morning.

“Bear licenses are the biggest attraction on OTC day,” said Michelle Mulrony, lead customer service representative in the Southeast Region offices. “People are very excited about the start of the hunting season. They want their license right away.”

It’s fun, she said, and the fun is only just getting started. Wait until leftover day hits Aug. 1.

“Leftover day is huge,” Mulrony said. “We had people 50 deep last year waiting for leftover day.”

The line for leftover licenses will form at the glass classroom entrance doors on the east side of the building. In recent years, tents have circled the Southeast Region building at 4255 Sinton Road in Colorado Springs. Portable restrooms were brought in to accommodate the campers.

The crowds come because leftover day is a chance to buy tags that were previously offered during the draw and often represent prime hunting opportunities.

“During the draw process, you can only take one tag per species,” Mulrony said. “Leftover day is the only way to get another tag from the same species.”

There is a lot of behind-the-scenes work to prepare for leftover day. Mulrony will convert the CPW’s Hunters Education classroom into a war room to handle the crush.

“It’s organized chaos,” she said, describing how 30 CPW staff members – or nearly everyone in the Southeast Region office – will pitch in to help.

She asks hunters to come prepared. At check-in, they will be asked to fill out a sheet indicating what they want to buy, what licenses they hold, whether they’ve completed a hunter’s education course and other questions. The hunters will be processed by CPW staff who will do computer searches to check for conflicts, such as whether their licenses are suspended.

“Last year, we sold 297 licenses on leftover day,” she said.

Follow this link to CPW’s OTC and Leftover license page for more details.

And here is a list of things to remember:

Be Prepared

Those who plan to purchase leftover licenses at license agents or CPW offices should be prepared before they arrive. This will help the process run as efficiently as possible.

If you are planning on purchasing a license, be sure to have the following:

  • Your driver’s license/state issued identification card,
  • Proof of hunter education: hunter education card or a Colorado hunting license with verified hunter education,
  • Your social security number (anyone 12 years of age and older are required to give their social security number, if not already on file),
  • Your customer identification number (CID), if you have previously purchased a license in Colorado,
  • Proof of residency, if you are planning to purchase a resident license,
  • A prioritized list of hunt codes for licenses you are interested in.

If purchasing a license for someone else (can only be done IN PERSON), the buyer must bring the following for the hunter:

  • A clear copy of both sides of their driver’s license/state issued identification card,
  • A clear copy of both sides of t heir hunter education card or a previous Colorado hunting license with verified hunter education,
  • Their social security number (anyone 12 years of age and older are required to give their social security number, if not already on file),
  • Their customer identification number (CID), if they have previously purchased a license in Colorado,
  • A prioritized list of hunt codes they are interested in.

IMPORTANT: One cannot buy a license for someone else over the phone. The option to buy for someone else only works in person.

###

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.

Big-Game Allocations for Colorado’s Gunnison Basin

Big game licensing open house in Gunnison, March 30

CPW_SiteLogoGUNNISON, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife will present the proposed 2017 big-game license allocations for the Gunnison Basin at an open house, 4:30-7 p.m., March 30, at the Fred Field Center at the Gunnison County Fairgrounds in Gunnison.

CPW biologists and district wildlife managers will be on hand to talk about the status of deer, elk, bears, pronghorn and moose in Game Management Units 54, 55, 551, 66 and 67. Agency staff will also explain CPW’s recommendations for license availability for deer and elk seasons and take comments from the public.

Terrestrial Biologist Kevin Blecha will give an overview presentation, one to start the meeting and another at 6 p.m.

CLICK TO SHOP

CPW will also present the latest information on winter deer-survival monitoring.

CPW staff will also be available to answer questions about applying for big game licenses for those who need assistance.

For more information, call 970-641-7060.

###

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 42 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW’s work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.


Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google Pinterest YouTube Instagram

Help me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.

Advertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.

Apply for Colorado Big Game Licenses by April 4th

Big Game DeadlineThe April 4th deadline to apply for a big-game license is fast approaching. And if you plan to hunt big game in Colorado this fall, now’s the time to submit your application. The 2017 Colorado Big Game Brochure includes everything you need to know to help you get ready for the upcoming big-game seasons.

http://tunein.com/embed/player/p963773/

Apply Online

Buy Your 2017 Fishing License

Rainbow-trout-CPW-3e46e304-481d-434b-adec-8877d89bdcaeWhile you’re applying for your big-game license, remember to add on your fishing license. An annual license is good starting April 1, 2017 through March 31, 2018. You can purchase a license online at CPW’s secure license application portal or by phone at 1-800-244-5613 . Get tips and stay up to date on Colorado fishing regulations by reading the 2017 Colorado Fishing Brochure.

Connect with Mia – Twitter  Facebook  +Google PinterestYouTubeInstagramHelp me create better videos for YOU by showing your support at Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/MiaAnstine.https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLi4hlqmeGCp9SfT4UyeV-PPrjavM0LbdOAdvertisements on this site do not express or represent the opinion of MAC Outdoors or Mia Anstine.

Sportsmen’s Activity Report: Colorado Benefits from Economic Impact of Hunting

I never consider it a “wasted tag”. My money goes to great things in the beautiful state of Colorado.

Sportsmen’s Activity Report: Colorado Benefits from
Economic Impact of Hunting

Read the Report

View/Download as PDF

NEWTOWN, Conn. — The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) has released a major new report documenting the importance of hunting activities to the Colorado economy. NSSF is the trade association for the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industry.

The report, Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation, provides detailed information about participation and expenditures by America’s hunters. In Colorado alone, hunting added $762,750,827 to the state’s economy and supported 8,355 jobs.

Information on 40-plus categories of U.S. hunting-related expenditures, which grew 55 percent, is contained in the report, as well as state-by-state statistics for number of hunters, retail sales, taxes and jobs. The report notes an overall nine percent increase in hunting participation between 2006 and 2011. The money hunters spent in 2011 resulted in $87 billion being added to the nation’s economy and supported more than 680,000 jobs nationally.

“The major growth in spending by hunters is good news for businesses throughout the country, particularly small businesses in rural areas,” said NSSF President and CEO Steve Sanetti.

Beyond their impact on businesses and local economies, sportsmen are the leaders in protecting wildlife and habitats. When you combine license and stamp fees, excise taxes on hunting equipment and membership contributions to conservation organizations, hunters contribute more than $1.6 billion annually to conservation.

“Hunters are without peer when it comes to funding the perpetuation and conservation of wildlife and natural habitats,” said Sanetti.

Read Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation or view the report as a printable PDF.

To request hard copies of the report, email Jim Curcuruto at jcurcuruto@nssf.org (limited quantity available).